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Thread: Pros/Cons taking your dog moose hunting

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    Member AKdutch's Avatar
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    Default Pros/Cons taking your dog moose hunting

    I was thinking of taking my dog to moose camp with me this year. Just like to hear other peoples experience good or bad. I usually spend about 10 days hunting alone and would be nice to have him around. John

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    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
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    Cons: extra weight in dog food
    barking
    extra scent from waste and the dog himself
    possibility of losing him whether he runs off, bear, wolves, or moose.
    extra stress and worry- 1 more thing you have to take care of

    Pros: good companionship
    good bear alert
    you could eat him if you had to......



    Release Lake Trout

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKdutch View Post
    I was thinking of taking my dog to moose camp with me this year. Just like to hear other peoples experience good or bad. I usually spend about 10 days hunting alone and would be nice to have him around. John
    Guess it depends on the dog. I've had them in camp for years and they can be a very valuable asset. They need to well trained for the basic commands and be exposed to the "camp" type setting before actually taking them to camp.
    Also a big help the train them come to some sound like a raven's call, rather than having to yell "get your dumb ***** back here".
    Good luck - they can be a really great if trained - though a real head-ache if not.
    Joe

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    The only reason I wouldn't bring a dog hunting is if he/she would spook/flush game I did not want them too. Most moose I have been around are not too concerned about dogs, so I would not be worried about it. Moose are not that skiddish.
    If you have reasonable control over your dog, and you know he/she is not going to bolt at the sight of moose and start nippin' hooves, I would say go for it. But, if your dog hates moose, leave em' home.
    Put hunter orange on the dog, and they will make a great bear scout, as previously mentioned. I'm sort of the type that brings my dog everywhere, so I am always pushing the limits, but be respectful so your dog isn't ruining any one else's hunt.
    My dog could not care less about anything else in the world but me, and that's the way I like it.

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    Member Kotton's Avatar
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    My buddie and I bring our mutts along to moose camp,Soon as she notices me packing gear she sits at the door for days knowing im going some were.We leave them tied up at camp on some runs when we go out to hunt,hopefully never have a bear bother them but both of them barking should keep them at bay.Does make you feel better about leaving stuff at camp knowing they won't let any strange persons come check out whats there.My mutt comes everywere outdoors with me,but when hunting,only to moose camp.That would prolly change if she would haul my sheep gear up a mountian,but she is geting a little plump in her old age!

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    I think Joe said it very well, if your dog is well behaved I would think the company of your furry friend on a hunt all alone would be a very welcome companion....
    Would /could be very valuable when walking up on a kill site if a big ole brown bear decides to hide out in the bushes and await your return!
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    Porcupines are my biggest concern. I see them all of the time it seems. My dog hasn't had any experience with them and if they were to run into each other while out hunting, I'm not too sure how to deal with it. I've never had too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    Guess it depends on the dog. I've had them in camp for years and they can be a very valuable asset. They need to well trained for the basic commands and be exposed to the "camp" type setting before actually taking them to camp...
    Joe
    Sounds like great advice to me. Good dog (meaning obedient dog) is an asset IMO & E; bad dog (meaning free-spirited dog) can and IME probably will be a real pain.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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    We use them, well trained dogs, extensively in Siberia and the Russian far-East. With the exception of when in tiger country. On our float trips in Kamchataka, I have seen many times a 40# East siberia hunting dog spot a brown bear near my fishermen and run it down and across the river. Unfortunately, we did looser her a few years back to a crazy bear, as some are. These were not "people dogs" per-say, but knew their job. They smell and hear a million time better than we humans.
    My favorite, for Alaska is my well disciplined Chesapeake. It's all about the training from the owner and time they spend in the woods.
    Just my thoughts,
    Goo

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    I have taken my dog moose and bear hunting but then again she goes everywhere our family goes. never tried leaving her in camp and don't think that would go over all to well. She tends to get upset being left behind and would bark and try everything to get off that leash.

    So far I have not had any animals care a least little bit about her being out there. The caribou even find her antics entertaining and tend to play with her.

    Bears she is all ears and nose and lets us know when they are around which is nice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by swampdonkey View Post
    Porcupines are my biggest concern. I see them all of the time it seems. My dog hasn't had any experience with them and if they were to run into each other while out hunting, I'm not too sure how to deal with it. I've never had too.
    I've seen quite a few dogs that got into it with a procupine and lost (comes with growing up in a vet clinic). There would be nothing you could do for them in the bush. We would knock them out and then spend an hour or so pulling all the quills. I would never try that on an animal that was awake, or you will probably end up with quills in you as well.

    Funny side story with dogs nd porcupines. There was one dog that used to get into them every chance it could. After about the 3rd trip in, my dad guessed it was liking the pain meds little too much, so after talking with the owner they sent it home without any. That did the trick and it never went near another porcupine after that.
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    Guess it depends on the dog. I've had them in camp for years and they can be a very valuable asset.
    Dusty?

    I never bring a dog moose hunting. One bark and the moose have made me. Besides, somebody needs to stay home and guard the chickens.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKdutch View Post
    I was thinking of taking my dog to moose camp with me this year. Just like to hear other peoples experience good or bad. I usually spend about 10 days hunting alone and would be nice to have him around. John
    AKd
    I guess it's ok to take a dog moose hunting, altho that little paragraph on page 19 of the ADF&G regs might give you cause for concern.... Back in the 70's a story made the rounds where a good ole boy took his yap (barking) dog moose hunting. While he was setting up camp the dog wandered off and found a cow with calf.. The dog irritated the cow, the cow chased the dog back to camp and the good ole boy ended up getting stomped trying to save the dog.. He got away from the cow, shot the dog and came home without any meat....
    a few yrs ago we had an old Black Lab cross... He loved to hunt... One year the guy that was supposed to go with me in my river boat, bailed out at the last minute, so on a whim I took the old dog along for companionship... The 2nd day I shot a young bull, the dog looked at the bull, looked at me for direction.. I couldn't resist and told him to "go get it"... As the dog was reaching for a hind leg to grab ahold of he got whacked pretty good as the moose was still kicking.. He backed off, eyed the moose and then went and grabbed an ear and held on... As I approached, he looked up at me with those big orange eyes, as if to say "I got it under control boss...!" There was no leaving him home after that...../John

  14. #14

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    man, some of my best memories are with my dogs in the field, including moose and caribou float hunting, mountains hikes, etc.

    I agree with most input about dogs that are accustomed to your behavior and are well-minded knuckle heads. The earlier you can break them in the better they'll behave (IMO).

    I say, why not take them if they work well with you and love it as much as you do?

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    My dog loves to go in the field. If he sees me grab a gun ... he's at the door waiting. I took him moose hunting once when I drew a cow moose permit. That was a mistake ... as I would stalk and get within shooting distance, he would chase after the moose. I was so angry; he did this 3 or 4 different times. I finally hiked back out to the truck and left. He has since settled down, but I don't think I'd take him. If I tied him up at camp, he would bark the entire time I was gone. It wouldn't work.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Larry - your chocolate looks a lot like my 4 year old (she still looks like a puppy).

    I take my dog duck, goose, and ptarmigan hunting :-) - that is what she is made for. I haven't taken her moose hunting yet, but she would do fine I am sure. She hikes and backpacks and fishes with us every weekend in the summer...as soon as we start gathering gear she knows what's up and will get in the truck and not get out until we leave for the weekend's adventure.

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    Again its not the dog, its the training-- I knew Larry's dog and he knew mine. It takes a lot of love and time to teach them the RULES!! Never had a problem!!
    Well worth the effort-- Just my thoughts.
    Goo

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    I 2nd Bronco's comments;
    "I have taken my dog moose and bear hunting but then again she goes everywhere our family goes. never tried leaving her in camp and don't think that would go over all to well. She tends to get upset being left behind and would bark and try everything to get off that leash.
    So far I have not had any animals care a least little bit about her being out there.
    Bears she is all ears and nose and lets us know when they are around which is nice."
    Our dog has turned us on to numerous critters, mosse, bear, and deer while I have had her hunting with me.
    She still hunts right behind me and when her nose becomes twitchy...something is in the neighborhood. I am convinced I would have walked right past moose that I have taken had she not clued me into their presence.
    She also tends to have a low growl that wakes us up when spots game on the beach in PWS, bears and deer have both been shot due to her nose and eyes.
    If your dogs behaved and you can control it, you might have a great hunting companion there.

  19. #19

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    bullelkklr, i sure miss my dog. He died this winter at 8 y/o from pancreatic illness. Man, it was like losing a best friend and family member. As goo stated, our dogs were friends, both gone this year. Sad days indeed.

    I guess my thoughts are, if you have them to enjoy in the field, don't hesitate to do it while you can. Who really cares if they blow a stalk or two...it's only one more experience you'll remember when their gone.

    I think back to this summer when sambo could barely walk without crapping his bowels out on the tundra...but he was in his element and I in mine. Those are good times, brother.

    The last trip we took together was this september on the Slope, and he shat himself (on me and inside my sleeping bag)...but man those were good times, mostly!

    I'm a sucker for good canines. Their field behavior makes them unique!

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    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    ****... Sorry to hear that, Larry. I can attest to how much you loved that dog. I'm not looking forward to that day at all.

    Taylor

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