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Thread: Spare Prop's

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    Member JR2's Avatar
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    Default Spare Prop's

    I have a Kingfisher 2825 with twin Honda 150's on it. I currently have 3x14.5x15 stainless props on the motors. I am looking to buy a pair of back up props and I want to by aluminum ones. Any suggestions on what size/pitch to buy to back up the stainless I currently have. Also any suggestions as to where to buy them in Anchorage. I dislike the Kingfisher dealer in Anchorage so anywhere but there.

    Thanks,

    John

  2. #2
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    I have used these guys and have been happy: A-1 Propeller & Impeller 210 East Potter Drive, Anchorage, AK 99518-1365 (907) 344-7767 ‎

    Generally, you will jump up a couple inches in pitch when going to aluminum. A pair of 17s would probably be a good bet if you are turning near max RPMs with your current setup.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    I would suggest http://www.fishcreek.biz/ on the Palmer Wasilla Hwy. They are a family run bussiness that has a good selection of props and will order anything you need. Takes 1-2 weeks to get what you want, but they have great prices. They sell just about anything for the outdoors. Just hit there summer cataloge. My son and I buy alot of stuff from them and we have always been pleased. I got a hard to find prop for a 72 Merc Motor a few years ago. They had one in stock. I was shocked.

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    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
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    Just wondering about the current props on that boat, have you run it wide open throttle to see if it maxes out at or a little under 6000 rpm? Reason I ask is my 26' Hewes AK with cabin and a pretty heavy load has twin Honda 135's and I am running 3x16x17 stainless Honda props on it and it maxes at 5950 rpm...it would seem yours might over rev with 14.5 props at 15 pitch?? Hopefully, your props are matched correctly, but you for sure want to check that before you buy more props to match them...

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    Have you looked into the piranha prop's they are a Kevlar composite and you can break down each blade. They are stronger than aluminum but not as strong as SS. I carry a set on my Hewescraft and have run those many times to ensure that they are the right fit for the boat. They are not as fast as SS but a bet faster than aluminum and are much more forgiving. You can change the pitch fast and easy by taking them off and replacing the blades. I bought them direct but there is a guy on the forum that sells them too. I think they are about the same price as aluminum maybe a little bit more not sure.
    Good luck

    Sweepint
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    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    Just a thought. I have twin 150s on my 26 Hewes PC and one will get me on step no problem with my current prop setup. When I replace my aluminums with stainless I'm going to up the pitch as these props let the motors hit the rev limiter but I'll keep at least one of my old props as a backup. My point is, if you lose a prop hitting something there at least a decent chance you might lose more than that. You might want to think about getting a backup that will enable you to get on step with one motor so you can get home on step, just in case you lose the lower unit as well.

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    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    I would suggest buying a com prop; they are cheap and will get you home. I wouldn’t worry about a perfect match; you only want a backup to get you home, just buy one that’s close to your current prop(s). You can usually pickup a composite prop for less than $100 bucks each; make sure they fit and stow away and hope you never have to use.
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    Member JR2's Avatar
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    I don't know what my current max RPM's are as the boat is brand new to me. I just don't want to head out onto the water with out a couple of spare props. My wife likes to call me a boy scout as I am always prepared for just about anything. Spare props, spare fuel filters, spark plugs, fuel pump, back up gps, back up VHF, bail out bag (food, gun, clothes) etc is all going on the boat. I may never use it but I feel better having it. Back to props.

    I am doubt that one of my motors is going to get me up on step even with the correct prop but that is certainly a good idea. I wonder what prop would give me the best chance? I guess I had better just run it once or twice and check the RPM's before I order new props. I looked at the piranha's last night and wondered if they where just a gimmick or good. Have to look at them again.

    Thanks for your help. I will report my max RPM's when I get the boat in the water and go from there. Knowing me the props on there now will become my backups and I will end up with something new.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JR2 View Post
    I don't know what my current max RPM's are as the boat is brand new to me. I just don't want to head out onto the water with out a couple of spare props. My wife likes to call me a boy scout as I am always prepared for just about anything. Spare props, spare fuel filters, spark plugs, fuel pump, back up gps, back up VHF, bail out bag (food, gun, clothes) etc is all going on the boat. I may never use it but I feel better having it. Back to props.

    I am doubt that one of my motors is going to get me up on step even with the correct prop but that is certainly a good idea. I wonder what prop would give me the best chance? I guess I had better just run it once or twice and check the RPM's before I order new props. I looked at the piranha's last night and wondered if they where just a gimmick or good. Have to look at them again.

    Thanks for your help. I will report my max RPM's when I get the boat in the water and go from there. Knowing me the props on there now will become my backups and I will end up with something new.

    Call the Honda service people, they can tell you what your max RPM's should be.. They should also be able to give you some guidelines as to what would be a power prop, and what would be a speed prop (regarding the pitch)..... Here's something else for you to worry about... A stainless prop is good for running in Saltwater, no question.... However if you ever do hit something with it, you'll probably bust the motors drive shaft before you'll bust a blade off of a Stainless prop... /John

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    Not sure what year your motors so you can find your RPM range is but here is a link with specifications for the current 150. http://marine.honda.com/Products/modeldetail/BF150

    If you have an older motor, just go to this page http://marine.honda.com/Owners/Manuals/models/BF150 and enter your serial number. You will be able to download a copy for free of your owners manual that will have all the info you should need. Hope this helps.

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    JR: I hope your wife appreciates you and is just kidding, you are doing this thing right!!

    I'm sure the props you have on the boat now, since it was used, are probably close to if not exactly right. You don't want to be lugging the engine, but if they are pitched too low and would go over max rpm (which I am betting is 6K), just watch your tach and be careful of that the first time out. As PatrickL said about his 26' Hewes, which is the same length and width as mine but heavier as he has the Pacific Cruiser, I also can easily get up on step with one motor. Your boat is two feet longer than ours, and I don't know how much heavier, and it depends on a lot of other things too...you'll just have to find out by trying it.

    ...and Old John is correct, as I know from experience and probably he does too, being old , if you hit a rock solidly with your stainless props they are going to cause a lot of lower unit damage. So there is a tradeoff, and I still have stainless props and it makes me paranoid about hitting rocks, as we all should be!

    So, I would say make your maiden voyage an easy one, get your props/rpms figured out, then buy your spare props. I'm a little confused by the guys that say to go up in pitch with aluminum props, I would only do that if you are going down in diameter...because when you go up in pitch, usually two numbers like from 15 to 17, you have higher top speed but less low end power, like going to a higher gear in your car. Maybe it's because AL props bite less than stainless, so are essentially lower geared? You should talk to the prop shop that Spoiled One recommended earlier in this thread, A-1 propeller in Anchorage. While you could talk to Honda, it is likely they couldn't help much unless you are talking to a dealer that has worked with your same motors and boat. Also, you maybe could talk to the person or dealership you bought the boat from? Maybe they can tell you if those props are the ones that came with the boat and were tested for WOT rpm...

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    Motors are 2007's, according to the manual the max RPM is 5000-6000. Nice wide range there, guess as along as I am above 5K I am not lugging the motors.

    The first trip will be out of Homer and I am familiar with that area and the chance of hitting a rock trolling for Kings is fairly slim. Thanks for your help and once I get some RPM numbers I will chat with A-1 and report back here.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by JR2 View Post
    Motors are 2007's, according to the manual the max RPM is 5000-6000. Nice wide range there, guess as along as I am above 5K I am not lugging the motors.

    The first trip will be out of Homer and I am familiar with that area and the chance of hitting a rock trolling for Kings is fairly slim. Thanks for your help and once I get some RPM numbers I will chat with A-1 and report back here.
    It is my personal opinion that you want to try and hit the upper half of the recommended RPM range. Personally, I would aim for the upper quarter. I highly advocate for some form of fuel management gauge if your boat didn't come with one. This will really help dial in the props that will best suit your needs. Enjoy your new boat!
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    JR2, I saw your posted boat pictures. Your Kingfisher looks like a nice one. I am sure you will really enjoy it.

    As an ex-boat dealer, I thought I might throw in a little more to think about.

    Number one, I wouldn't buy any new props until tried out the ones you have with a full load of fuel and passengers. See if you like the hole shot, top end, and RPMs.
    Number two, If you like the performance of your existing props, think carefully about a non-stainless as a backup. Aluminum and Composition prop just don't have the perfornace qualities of stainless. A polished stainless prop turns much easier in the water. It has built-in cupping to give you more hole-shot, lift, and speed---that is difficult to match with anything but stainless. Most engines have a "best match" stainless prop with just the right hub diameter and exhaust venting that the standard alum. prop might not duplicate. Also, if you ever ding a stainless prop and send it in (maybe to the lower 48) for a perfect repair, if your backup was another stainless copy of your existing props, you would have no performance differences while you are waiting.

    A local Honda dealer should be able to tell you what props to use. I bought my Kingfisher used last year through AM&D and had excellent service and the original prop they had put on works perfectly for me. Ron's Honda in Soldotna is also very good.

  15. #15

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    I`ve had some great success with the Pro-Pulse composite/adjustable props. The Pro-Pulse is a bit different from the Pirahna as it is adjustable out of the box and requires no other parts. I just grabbed one from West Marine for my 115 and it was just shy of $100. I used one on my open skiff and it was a night and day difference in that boat...scrubbed 2 mph but was on step alot faster so economy wasn`t effected. As mentioned it does perform better than aluminum especially with higher hp motors. They are a 4 blade design and would imagine the hole-shot with just one functional motor would be much better than a correct pitch stainless...mainly because you can pop it off from the swimstep, adjust to max pitch and go. I believe there to be a total of seven pitch settings, 5 marked and 1 at each end if needed. Anywho, that`s my .02.


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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    I run a Pro-Pulse on my 140 as well. I think its a good unit but dont have a lot to compare to.
    As AK2AZ said its EZ to adjust or replace a blade, also if damaged badly you could run it with 2 blades.
    The composites are thin like the SS, maybe not as thin but thinner than Aluminum, and thats the big advantage with a SS, a thinner blade is more efficent.
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JR2 View Post
    I have a Kingfisher 2825 with twin Honda 150's on it. I currently have 3x14.5x15 stainless props on the motors. I am looking to buy a pair of back up props and I want to by aluminum ones. Any suggestions on what size/pitch to buy to back up the stainless I currently have. Also any suggestions as to where to buy them in Anchorage. I dislike the Kingfisher dealer in Anchorage so anywhere but there.

    Thanks,

    John
    JR2
    Free advice is usually worth about what it costs... (My Dad's favorite)... But before you go laying out more money for extra/spare props... As you stated, your a cautious guy, an old Boy Scout, and want to "be prepared".... Prepared for what...?
    So your a couple hours out and hit something and break or bend something.... are you going to hang up side down over the stern and change a prop..?? Can you...?? So you still have one good motor and can limp back to port, then change the damaged prop.. or just get it repaired if possible and put back on... A 14.5x15 prop comes pretty close to being what I'd call a power prop and it wouldn't surprise me that you could push that boat at a pretty good speed on just one.... I'd play around a little before I put out any money on spares/extras... Enjoy your boat....../John

  18. #18
    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old John View Post
    . are you going to hang up side down over the stern and change a prop..?? Can you...?? ..../John
    I've had the misfortune to have to change a damaged prop on my first boat about 4 or 5 years ago and another time to remove a prop to unwrap fishing line from an in-experienced angler guest on my current boat. The first, I hailed for assistance and a gentleman and his wife responded. I changed that prop on the back of his swimdeck near Calisto and Bear Glacier. What a pain in the butt that was in 2-3 footers, but I was able to. No way short of taking a dive or highly risking dropping hardware could I have done it hanging on the back of the boat. Tried to pay him but he refused. Left a really nice large ajustable SS wrench on his deck as payment. By the time he found it, I was underway and told him to just keep it. If he is on here, I thank you again. The second time, I limped into Mary's Bay on the one motor with fishing line wrapped arround the other. I deployed my Dingy and changed it that way. Much easier, but still would have been a pain in 2-3 footers had I not been near a cove. Line didn't get to my seals so it was a good training excercise. Having done two in two different boats, I learned changing a prop at sea is not easy by any means. Being prepared is much better than not.

  19. #19

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    In the original post, JR2 said that he wanted to buy aluminum props to replace (as spares) his two stainless props. My opinion is that after you take your boat out and see if you current props are giving you the rpms that you need (upper end of the stated WOT), then go to a prop shop and tell them you want 2 aluminum props that will give you the same rpms as your stainless props are now giving you. If it's a decent prop shop, then they should be able to choose the correctely pitched props for you. I think most prop shops will even let you borrow their props to test them out before you buy. Then if you have to change just one of your props out on the water, the one aluminum and one stainless that you will be running will be pretty much evenly matched. Assuming that you have counter rotating props now, you will of course have to buy an aluminum prop for each of the outboards. If I had twins, and they were not counter rotating, I would still buy two spare props. I would plan on the props on both outboards being destroyed at the same time and would not plan just one being destroyed and being able to get home on the other outboard/prop. Like you, I carry plenty of extra equipment on my boat just in case. I wouldn't worry about chosing composite vs. whatever else for a spare. I'd just get aluminum. After all, I assume you're just looking for a prop to get you back home and not a prop that you'll plan on using all the time.

  20. #20
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    The composite props have several advantages. if you are in a posistion where you can replace the prop. If you cant get at it, it wouldnt matter what type you have in the "spares", locker.

    If you have a prop strike there is probably a 50% chance of damaging both props or lower units, you just never know.
    With a adjustable prop you can switch one or both. If you end up with a damaged lower unit on one motor, you could run one and adjust the pitch accordingly, so as to get on step with one. Also saves having to carry too many extras.
    Just a thought...................
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

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