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Thread: Ordering garden seeds

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    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    Default Ordering garden seeds

    As spring approaches, it is time for me to start thinking about ordering garden seeds. Where do you order your seeds from? Or do you buy starts from the local nursery? I've got a couple of internet sites I am looking at to order from, but always interested in something new.

    In a few weeks I'll be starting a few tomatoes (seeds from last year) and a few other things and maybe a flat of greens just for browsing this spring before the garden actually grows.

    Grandma Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    there are a million seed companies out there. i have been buying seed for years, both for home garden and commercially for a greenhouse business, and ill give you my recommendations. i like johnnys, they offer a lot of organic, and untreated seed, as well as a great selection, but they are a bit pricier than the rest. territorial seed is another favorite. also pinetree seeds. those are probably my best three picks.

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    Member bilbo's Avatar
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    i buy from MOUNTAIN VALLEY SEED COMPANY out of Salt Lake City.
    the cheapest i have ever seen for moderate quantities.

    http://www.mvseeds.com for online catalogue ordering.
    http://www.mvseeds.com/images/16-Req...talog-Down.jpg
    tel: 801-486-0480

    you can co-op buy with 10 other gardeners and have 10 HUGE gardens for around 10-12 dollars each for seed.

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    i jsut got me some seeds last week from homedepots they are the alaska denali one.
    Semper Fi!

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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtysteev View Post
    there are a million seed companies out there. i have been buying seed for years, both for home garden and commercially for a greenhouse business, and ill give you my recommendations. i like johnnys, they offer a lot of organic, and untreated seed, as well as a great selection, but they are a bit pricier than the rest. territorial seed is another favorite. also pinetree seeds. those are probably my best three picks.
    Thanks to all for the links! I'll be checking them all soon.

    Yeah, dirtysteev, that's my problem there are a million companies out there...That is why I was hoping to get some insider info here to shorten the list and all that time surfing. I remembered a friend buys from Johnny Seed after I posted, haven't signed up there yet to see the prices. Am on a tight budget, so at least this year the price does matter.

    If I am in town it is usually easier to decide where and what to buy, but I highly doubt I will be anywhere near the stores and the city for quite some time, so everyones info is really appreciated.

    Thanks again, Grandma Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    Depending on the plants in question and how much time we've allowed to slip by, we buy both seeds and bedding plants, though some years we get by with just seeds.

    West Coast Seeds (in British Columbia) has had some seeds that were harder to get in some other places.

    Denali Seeds have been good. We try to stick to northern/short-season hybrids, unless there's a hot-house or cold-frame to put them in.

    Rarely do we haev any problem with any of the seeds not matching their description, though last year we had some Table King (???) Danish squash that was advertised as being productive, but great for small spaces. Knowing how squash, melons, etc., can spread out, we gave it s shot. The bad news? It took over three large raised beds. The good news? It grew some of the most HUGE Danish squash I've ever seen. My conclusion was that it was a freak batch of seeds, with some obvious unintended recessive traits that, in some ways, worked out great.. Or, should I say.. HUGELY successful..

    Baker Creek was another business we experimented with last year, advertising heirloom seeds, and banked varieties that are supposedly more rare. You can look into their reviews on-line and make up yourown mind. We weren't all that impressed with the items we ordered there.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    We sell both Denali Seeds and a company called Botanical Interests. Botatnical Interest seeds have been excellent for us. They are available on the web also.
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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Grandma View Post
    Thanks to all for the links! I'll be checking them all soon.

    Yeah, dirtysteev, that's my problem there are a million companies out there...That is why I was hoping to get some insider info here to shorten the list and all that time surfing. I remembered a friend buys from Johnny Seed after I posted, haven't signed up there yet to see the prices. Am on a tight budget, so at least this year the price does matter.

    If I am in town it is usually easier to decide where and what to buy, but I highly doubt I will be anywhere near the stores and the city for quite some time, so everyones info is really appreciated.

    Thanks again, Grandma Lori
    U need somone to mail you some???
    Semper Fi!

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    Quote Originally Posted by greythorn3 View Post
    U need somone to mail you some???
    Nope, I'll order on line and it will be sent to my daughter in town who will get it to where it needs to go so I can get it in time when the spring supplies to come in.

    It's complicated. At least sometimes living way out here.
    Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Grandma View Post
    As spring approaches, it is time for me to start thinking about ordering garden seeds. Where do you order your seeds from? Or do you buy starts from the local nursery? I've got a couple of internet sites I am looking at to order from, but always interested in something new.

    In a few weeks I'll be starting a few tomatoes (seeds from last year) and a few other things and maybe a flat of greens just for browsing this spring before the garden actually grows.

    Grandma Lori
    Hey gma would you please keep us posted what looks to be best for our alaskan enviroment, thank you
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    Thanks Ruffle and AKDoug.

    I seem to remember that last year I couldn't buy Denali Seeds online, so haven't even looked for that this year. I see now that I can indeed order online so I might just go with that for most stuff and then look around for a few specialty seeds I'd like to grow as well. The price is right and I've always had decent luck with Denali Seeds in the past.

    I also try to stick with Northern/short season varieties for the most part. But I do have a small greenhouse for other stuff that needs more of a controlled environment and also allows me some play when trying new veggies and herbs.

    Sorry I never got with you Ruffle on the potato seeds last fall. Time on the way back from the lower 48 was just too short to do much other than grocery shop. Had to hustle home to beat a storm or risk another week in town and I was already homesick after being in the lower 48 for almost 3 weeks.

    Thank all,
    Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    No problem re. the spuds, Lori. We've got a small surplus of the French Fingerlings from both sources still (and friends in the bush who grew them, as well as my family, are/were impressed with both of them).

    The German Butterballs (from three sources) have dwindled some, and we're now groping for sufficient seeds to send to the bush to my friend's root cellar for safe storage. Probably going to get some more of those from the one well-established and credentialed source, which I'd be happy to correspond with you about via either e-mail or PM.

    The Chieftains impressed me quite a bit, as well, and I may try to locate a reasonbable sourcee for more of those seeds spuds, other than the source we used last year. But they were 'pretty' (medium-red skinned, and lighter fleshed), HUGE spuds, and tasty. The right combinati0on, as far as I'm concerned. In those, I've managed to save -maybe- 5 lbs. to be used for seeds, and each time I look at them, licking my lips, I gently slap myself into a better perspective of delayed gratification..

    The folks at West Coast Seeds were a source for Blacktail Mtn watermelon seeds, as well as a variety of other intriguing items. They were notably busy, and thus had minimal time for a person as verbose as myself, but they were indeed helpful, delivered as promised, and sold reliable seeds. Of course, these days, the Canadian dollar is slightly more potent than USD, so....

    Anyway, let us know if you want some spud references. Or a small amount of the French Finglerling seed spuds from the two different sources.

    We've got an owl (or perhaps family of...) in the 'hood again, and my older son's German Shepherd pup seems content to catch voles by surprise through the snow's crust (part cat, perhaps??), so their damage may be mitigated some this year via various forms of natural intervention, putting off the need to buy or build more vole traps in protecting the spud crops. Or at least provide some cheap entertainment...

    On the larger hybrid spuds, we probably averaged 20-to-1 or 30-to-1 in production outcomes, but, as my friend in the bush complains frequently, I've also got a nice sprinkler set-up with manifolds, etc., and that contributes notably to our successes with the potatoes thus far. Of course, unlike our friends in the bush, you've got a river and a pump right there, too. ;^>)

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    Thanks Ruffle, email sent.
    Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    and yup, got a nice little water pump and the river is right out the front door (almost), maybe even closer if breakup turns out to be a bad one and eats away more of the bank and my yard!
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    Odd or ironic how, sometimes, advantages can turn into nightmares.. ;^>)

    It was the constantly rising property values, coupled with the constant loss of sq. footage, that led me to emphatically deny my former friend's request to purchase river-front property next to his years ago.

    The access for netting fish, traveling the river, hunting, etc., was awesome, but the reality of -being- there, year-round, year after year, the floods that came with regularity to one degree of depth or another, and the previously mentioned loss of land while the taxes went up, up, and away, told me I was better off buying land on the south side of the hills where the permafrost was nill, the sun lasted all day long, and the house didn't require pilings or stilts.

    Now-days I drive to the landing when I need to launch.. but I do miss the gravel pits and the free (private) swimming that occurred with fair regularity back then. Most of those places are now settled, developed, owned, and prohibit that sort of thing.

    Heck, I used to take summer baths in what are now some pretty high-falootin' properties, and back then they were just deep gravel ponds surrounded by willows and alder... Time marches on.. ;^>)

    Consequerntly, I also spent a lot of money on a well, but have lots of good water now, too. ;^>)

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    I like baker creek seed heirloom seed company and Seed Saver's Exchange. Both have heirloom varieties that do well in the short summer.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

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    +1 on Seed Saver's Exchange - good selection (lots of organic), good prices, and good service.

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