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Thread: Fantastic Pics, What cameras

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    Member barrowdave's Avatar
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    Default Fantastic Pics, What cameras

    are you guys using? Those were great photos, all of them. I want to get a digital with enough megapixels to take pics like those and have a good zoom also. I am photographically challenged! Can you all help me out?

    Thanks, Dave

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    Member northstar's Avatar
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    Hi Dave,

    I recently got a Canon 400D Rebel XTi and am pretty impressed with it. It seems to be a pretty popular camera with good reviews. It came with a Canon 18-55mm lens and I also bought a Canon EF 75-300mm f4-5.6 III with it. Just got a Manfrotto 3001 w/804RC2 head tripod for it and I'm eyeing next the Canon 60mm 2.8 Macro for some good close-ups. I'd like to get some of those Alaska snowflake close-ups that look like the BattleStar Galactica shots.

    I'm curious too what everyone else is using.

    Regards,
    Mike

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    I bought the Sony DSC-H2 6 megapixel which has a Zeiss lens in 12X optical, this is equivelent to a 36-432mm lens. I liked my old 35mm with optional lenses but found that I rarely used the bigger lenses. This is a smaller and lighter package then some with big lenses. For someone that isn't a photographer it has everything I need. Even takes very good videos considering its a camera. As for batteries, I don't know what the others come with but the AA Nickel Metal-Hydride that came with my Sony are amazing. They outlast any alkaline battery by a long shot. I need to try them out in my GPS and see how they do next.

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    The Photos I posted were taken with a Canon Power Shot A620 which has 7.1 mega pixel and 20 shooting modes that I am still learning how to use.
    Its been fun playing with it.

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default Sony

    I have used the Sony Cybershots with great sucess. Great camera and very user friendly. The Auto mode takes great pictures. Simply point and shoot. My newest, a Sony DSC W 100 is a wonderful camera. I took it on a canoe trip on a lower Noatak trib this past August and took over 200 pics on a 1 Gig memory card in 8 megapixel mode (finest quality the camera is capable of) and used about 1/2 the battery. I had taken an extra battery due to the trip being 12 days long and knowing that I would take lots of pictures. It was below freezing on many nights and that reduces the claimed battery life considerable as well. I slept with the camera in the sleeping bag at night to help with this. Great camera. Packs in any small pocket. It is the size of a pack of cigarettes. If you want to see some pictures I shot with it on that Sony camera, send me a email and I will send you some pics. I recently got a Pentax wb 20 (waterproof) camera for a fly fishing canoe trip in Bristol Bay this coming Aug/Sept. It would be great for a river/fishing trip. Cool to take some underwater photos of the fish. And nice to leave the pelican cases behind that normally hold the cameras. Rain or shine, its a good choice. Not the quality of the Sony for landscapes, but definately great for its intended purpose.

    danattherock@hotmail.com Dan

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The first question is whether you want a point and shoot or slr style camera. Personally I think having both is a good way to go, as there are times you'll take a point and shoot and not the slr, though for top end pictures, the slr is the way to go because of the lens options.

    5-6 megapixels is good resolution for smaller prints and displaying on a computer. It's when you want to zoom in and crop a picture or larger prints that the higher res cameras come into play.

    You can get a very good point and shoot 5mp camera for around $300, I've used sony cool pixs and like them, but cannon also makes excellent cameras. My biggest beef with the point and clicks is they seem to be slow to focus and slow to record on the memory cards. This really makes itself present when taking action pics, ie kids playing soccer etc.

    In the slr's, the biggest expense if you get a full outfit are the lenses. Often times the package lenses that come with the cameras are mediocre quality, and you are better off getting the bare body and sepperate higher quality lenses.

    I'd say start with a good point and shoot, and then consider an SLR if you find the camera is limiting you.

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    Member barrowdave's Avatar
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    Default Thank you.

    I appreciate all of the information. Gives me a lot to make a decision with. The beauty of Alaska is amazing, even up here on the frozen tundra!

    Thank you.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    This pic was taken with a Nikon Coolpix 5mp camera, As I recall it was a bit over $200 at Costco last year.



    Not a fantastic picture, it was hazy/drizzly with less than perfect lighting. This also wasn't the highest resolution as I was using the internal memory at the time and hence kept the pics smaller to allow more on the internal memory. But for snapshot pictures it does fine.
    Last edited by Paul H; 02-26-2007 at 14:28. Reason: file too big

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    P.S. you can get a rediculously awesome 60 mp photo with a $100 body, a very sharp lens, a light meter, and a roll of fujichrome velvia, yea I have a DSLR but slide film still destroys is in terms of well everything that matters except for quanity.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    I'd have to agree with alot of what Paul said. To add to that and I may be wrong but the SLR cameras I have seen are first more expensive and secondly don't take video's. The Sony I described isn't the fastest camera for sports but then again it takes nice videos. You have to decide what you want out of the camera. There are other brands similar to my Sony, they take video as well but won't zoom in and out in video mode. Lots of optoins, depending on your wallet.

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    Default Dave...

    Like Paul said, you have to decide if you want a camera with a removable lens (SLR stands for Single Lens Reflex, ie it uses a mirror & prisim to show what the lens sees) or a fixed lens camera (Digicam or point & shoot).

    Now with the SLR's you going to pay more (YGWYPF) & you have to buy seperate lenses & acessories to accomdate the type of shooting you do, & with SLR's you have much broader range of creativity & control than you do with other type of camera's.

    With Point & shoots, you have some with 10x zooms that can really be benificial to a beginner but not with any type of shutter controls that an amater or pro would want, & some may have the controls but not in the range you can get with an SLR, price is the biggest seller in this class.

    Before you buy a digital SLR you should purchase an inexpesive film SLR & go from there, I bought my Canon GII from Wally's & paid less than $250 & now a days you could probably find them dirt cheap on Ebay...

    Me, I was done with Point & shoots when I couldn't produce fine photographs that I wanted, was sick & tired of kids & wifey shots that were always blurry, my SLR changed all that, if the pics came back blurry, it was mostly my fault. & now with my digital XT, WHEW! Where do you wanna go today?
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    Default Cameras

    I'm not the expert in our household, but my wife has a whole wall of awards for her photography....she shoots a Nikon D-200 and uses Photoshop and Quark to make up about whatever she needs. She sold her SLRs years ago when digital got good enough that you can hardly tell the difference with the naked eye. The Nikon is awesome, even my pics are good!

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    Member RainGull's Avatar
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    The Nikons (D70 D80 D2 D200) are very nice.

    I took this one (Nikon D70) trying to illustrate a principle to my wife (that you can find great things to photo everywhere). So I pulled over at a random spot and started snapping in a ditch.


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    Default Where the Heck did you find...

    A Thistle in Alaska? & why didn't you spray it with something?

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    I have a couple Canon DSLRs and a small sack full of glass for them, but usually when I'm out and about, I use a panasonic FZ5. It's a 5MP, 12x superzoom wonder camera that cost about $300 when new. It has all the manual controls for everything a photographer would need, but also lets you just point & shoot when you want. It also has optical image stabilization, and that's very important for a long lens camera unless you want to pack a tripod along too. I pack it in a small Pelican box for water resistance.

    BTW, don't buy a camera that advertises digital image stabilization (or anti-blur, etc.), and ignore all talk about digital zoom. Two very worthless "features." If it isn't *optical* stabilization and *optical* zoom ignore it.

    I find that 5MP will get you a pretty decent 12x18" print. 8MP will be very marginally better, but it's hard to spot the difference in even a large print.

    There are a couple current cameras in the superzoom catagory that I would recommend. The Canon Powershot S3 IS, Panasonic FZ7/FZ8. Panasonic's FZ30/FZ50 are better, but also are a higher priced alternative.

    For DSLR's, just about any of them are pretty good, but if I wsa buying new right now I would get a Pentax K100D or K10D for their built in stabilization system. Sony's have the same, but I don't recommend Sony anything. If that's not your bias, it's a pretty decent camera, although the Pentax is better, IMO. But it really is the lens that makes the difference. Megapixels are almost meaningless. DSLR's alos have the advantage of looking good at high ISO, which makes them far better in low light.

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    Default Sony

    I am going to agree with AKbighorn. I have the same camera and its takes fantastic pictures. The benefit of AA batteries is a plus as well. I can't believe Sony incorporated a non-proprietary battery in a product! The zeiss lenses are awesome and the camera functions are easy to access. Just point and shoot. It does take a while to recharge the flash though.
    I use an olympus stylus weatherproof digital camera on my hunting trips. Trust me its waterproof! I had a friend drop it in Willow creek and it still works great, no damage at all. It only has a 3x optical zoom though, which is ok since I am usually only taking photos of scenery or dead critters. Sony's 12X optical zoom is definitely a great selling point too!

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    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Arrow I guess I am the exception to the rule.. ..

    .. Old school. I still like film but I do not use a 35 mm. I use a camera the size of two bricks almost. and almost as heavy. Mamiya RB 67 the RB stands for revolving back so I don't have to turn the camera to get a vertical composition, and I can take backs off and use another back instantly if I want to change films or even put a polaroid back on it.

    the negative or slide is the size of a pack of cigarettes.. 2 1/4" x 2 3/4" = what is called "perfect format" which means you can place the scene to all four edges and put it on paper exactly the same as what you see in the view finder.

    and Contrary to popular belief.. the worst time to take photos is when it is sunny out.. the most gorgeous color comes when it is over cast, just before it rains or right after it rains.. THERE is your best color ever!

    Look!.. at a stop sign closely on a sunny day.. and again on a rainny day.. TWO entirely different colors.. do the same with a school bus!

    I have never ever had any classes in photograhy, I have taught in college, I have taught pro's in the darkroom & many students, and I have even taught Kodak! .. .. .. "get that patened they told me.. we have been trying to do this for over sixty years!

    I will be posting lots of images in the photography section and offer some good tips on shooting BETTER.. color !

    just drop me a line anytime.. I am always at my desk!

  18. #18
    Member RainGull's Avatar
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    Medium Format is definately the higher order of things. One fine day. I hear tell ebay has rb 67's up often for pittance. Now I just need the spare pittance!

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    A 4MP to 6MP camera works just fine, but more MP helps with larger prints of the same quality. One can make an smaller image larger, but to a point. After that, the pixels open-up and the photo loses quality. With an 8MP camera one can print an approximately 32" x 42" photo of the same quality as a 12" x 18" from a 6MP camera, taking into account camera software and lens quality. Now, the average person wants photos of the kids, friends, things they may see out there, etc., and 3" x 5" prints are the most common. Bu if you want to zoom-in and crop a photo, a larger image allows you to do that (to a point) without making the photo look grainy. If one can get close enough to the subject, and uses the correct camera settings, one still can produce an outstanding image with a camera that has a smaller sensor.

    I prefer digital SLR cameras of at least 8MP. I could get by with an 6MP camera, however, but prefer the extra 2MP without having to jump to 10+ MP cameras. I use an 8MP Canon Rebel XT, and would not mind having a Rebel XTi (10.1MP), but 8MP is plenty for my needs. I plan to upgrade from the kit lens to a better lens, instead of upgrading the camera. Cameras are upgraded from the manufacturer once per year, and the price of the old one drops to nearly 50% when the upgraded version comes out.
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  20. #20
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Talking Razor Sharp Prints.. ..

    I cannot show you the sharness of what an image taken with an RB is capable of, simply because a computer monitor can't display that sharpness!

    cameras.com E.Phillip Levine (deceased) but his fantastic camera store is still open for business. They have alot of used RB equip.

    I can take an RB negative and have it enlarged to 40" x 60" with razor sharpness!

    I can say this, only because I have done it many times!

    22 mega pixel digital back fits on this camera also.. ! but the price is a new morgtage on your house!



    This is Spirit Lake - Mt. St. Helens one week before it blew, Everyone who was here, when it blew, DIED.

    But the razor sharpness in this image is incredible, This was not taken by me, but by a friend of mine who bought a Mamiya RB.. and he had absolutey no idea how to usee a light meter, He still doesn't. But he does know.. how to "read" light! This is / was the very first thing I used to teach my students.. TURN OFF THAT LIGHT METER.. forget it. Now.. learn how to READ.. light! it is much easier than you would ever think or or believe. In all my images on my web site.. no meter is ever used. I quit using a light meter in 1973, and haven't attempted to use one SINCE!

    One think I love about my Mamiya.. even though it was encased in ICE at 50 below.. it worked flawlessly. .and it doesn't ever need batteries!

    Since all of my photos are created in below zero weather. I want a dependable rugged camera, that is not relying on electricity! So, for you 35 mm fans.. Pentax K1000 is an excellent mechanical camera that will never fail you, no matter what the temp.

    You all might want to check out " caribou-adventures.com "

    enjoy, and I leave you one pic.. .. (cause it is worth 1000 words!)

    -=[click]=-


    48 TONS.. .. OF FOOD!


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