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Thread: Rod and reel advice for Reds?? Have no idea what im doing.....

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    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Default Rod and reel advice for Reds?? Have no idea what im doing.....

    I love to catch Reds on the Kenai. I've caught plenty on my baitcaster, but I want to start the flyfishing gig. It looks like a ball, but i have ZERO idea on what size of rod to use, reel to buy, line weight, backing, etc.

    I'm thinking like a 10 weight rod. Is that a good place to start? Any help would be awesome.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
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    Dude, get a 9wt Lamiglas with a 9 wt reel on there. Something like a pflueger or something like that. Put some 20# back on that ********* and some sink tip fly line and you have yourself the beginnings of a *****in' red set up. Get just enough weight on there to bounce off the top of the rocks and about 3 feet between your fly and weight, and I'd say you have your self some reds in the cooler!
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

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    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
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    I guess I swear to much for the forum....I guess that comes with being in the military and from the mid west!
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    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Cool! I will have to try that. Thanks!
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    I think you'd be fine with either an 8wt or a 9wt. I use a 7wt quite a bit, but that's as lows as I typically go. My go-to rod for flipping reds is a 9-ft 9wt I got from Cabelas on clearance.

    Remember that you're still flipping a lot of lead, so you don't need a high-end super casting fly rod. Just like with a baitcast, rods are bound to get dinged up with lead flying around fighting strong fish in close quarters. Look for a rod with a good lifetime warranty, but you don't need to dump a lot of money into the rod. Consider TFO, Echo, St. Croix, and Lamiglas.

    The quality of the reel is probably more important than the rods, as you want a reel with a good, smooth, reliable reel. Most reels are rated for a range of line - like say 7wt to 9wt or 8wt to 10 wt. Large arbor reels have an oversized spool in the middle, so end up being a little bigger overall to hold comparable line to a more traditional reel. But you get a faster line retrieve with a large arbor (no mechanical advantage on most fly rods - 1:1 ratio on the reel). Most the reels you see these days are large arbor. Some brands to consider: Lamson, Ross, Pfleuger, Okuma, Scientific Anglers.

    Put some 30lb backing on - standard dacron fly line backing - at least 100 yards.

    Any floating or sink-tip fly line will work fine. Most you'll see are WF. Again, you're not really casting a lot so don't need the best line out there. Anything from Cortland, Rio, Scientific Anglers, or whatever else you find is probably good enough.

    Once you start fishing for reds with a fly rod you'll never go back.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

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    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyo2AK View Post
    I think you'd be fine with either an 8wt or a 9wt. I use a 7wt quite a bit, but that's as lows as I typically go. My go-to rod for flipping reds is a 9-ft 9wt I got from Cabelas on clearance.

    Remember that you're still flipping a lot of lead, so you don't need a high-end super casting fly rod. Just like with a baitcast, rods are bound to get dinged up with lead flying around fighting strong fish in close quarters. Look for a rod with a good lifetime warranty, but you don't need to dump a lot of money into the rod. Consider TFO, Echo, St. Croix, and Lamiglas.

    The quality of the reel is probably more important than the rods, as you want a reel with a good, smooth, reliable reel. Most reels are rated for a range of line - like say 7wt to 9wt or 8wt to 10 wt. Large arbor reels have an oversized spool in the middle, so end up being a little bigger overall to hold comparable line to a more traditional reel. But you get a faster line retrieve with a large arbor (no mechanical advantage on most fly rods - 1:1 ratio on the reel). Most the reels you see these days are large arbor. Some brands to consider: Lamson, Ross, Pfleuger, Okuma, Scientific Anglers.

    Put some 30lb backing on - standard dacron fly line backing - at least 100 yards.

    Any floating or sink-tip fly line will work fine. Most you'll see are WF. Again, you're not really casting a lot so don't need the best line out there. Anything from Cortland, Rio, Scientific Anglers, or whatever else you find is probably good enough.

    Once you start fishing for reds with a fly rod you'll never go back.
    Okay. I could see where the 7 weight would be really exciting, but I think I'll go with an 8 or 9.

    What about a rig setup? Use split shot for weight?
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
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    I usually go with the rubber core sinkers. Split shot work also and allow you to adjust weight faster. I just use the rubber cores because they're cheap and I can carry a lot of different sizes. No need to over think the weight and what type works better. Use whatever you're comfortable with. The biggest thing is to get just enough on there that you're just bouncing the top of the rocks.
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

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    Member muzzyman87's Avatar
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    Default I had to...

    again......
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails telephone_pole1.jpg  
    I am not against the flippin kenai, since I cannot but suspect it keeps armies of the unworthy from discovering every other stream... ~Paul O'Neil~/~Wyo2AK~

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    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
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    Hysterical dude, gave me a good chuckle
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

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    Member cube01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by muzzyman87 View Post
    again......
    Not to steal Muzzy's thunder, but I made the telephone pole image... I normally wouldn't say anything, but he is txting me and bragging about shamelessly using my work. I cannot allow that. Especially from someone who can't even find time to tie flies...

    pwned.

  11. #11
    Member kwackkillncrew's Avatar
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    thats why he uses power bait
    I will never be a "Prostaffer" its not that I am not good enough
    but its because I refuse to pimp products for free.

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    Go with an 8wt reddington red fly outfit. Comes with everything you need. Rod, Reel, Backing, and line. It is a great beginners setup. I spend a lot of time fishing for reds and this is what I tell all beginners and have yet to have anyone say I pointed them in the wrong direction.

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    Quote Originally Posted by akflyfisher View Post
    Go with an 8wt reddington red fly outfit. Comes with everything you need. Rod, Reel, Backing, and line. It is a great beginners setup. I spend a lot of time fishing for reds and this is what I tell all beginners and have yet to have anyone say I pointed them in the wrong direction.
    Thanks for the suggestion akflyfisher. The price for the outfit seems pretty affordable. Do you think the reel (Crosswater Graphite Reel) has sufficent drag for fishing on the Kenai River?

    Thanks, Jay

    http://www.sellnsend.com/p-775-redin...LAID=385228123


    quote: "Features:
    • Fast Action
    • The caramel-colored blank is a blend of 51- and 42- million modulus graphite
    • AAA grade cork handle
    • Pac Bay Aluminum Oxide stripping guides
    • Titanium colored anodized aluminum reel seat components, with a 1-inch fighting butt on the 7wt through 9wt models
    • 2-piece and 4 piece outfits come with the Crosswater graphite reel, prespooled with backing, knotless leader and RIO Mainstream fly line in a durable tan carrying case
    • Lifetime Warranty (rod only)
    Reel Features:
    • Constructed of high-density graphite composite
    • Rulon drag surface
    • Large arbor construction
    • Fly graphic silk-screening
    • One-way clutch easy to switch retrieve directions"

  14. #14
    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    I use a fly rod for red's but I'm pretty sure it's not fly fishing. I think that the long rod, combined with the highly visible fly line makes it easier to flip for reds than using a baitcaster or spinning gear. Fly line doesn't get twisted up like mono can and my 9wt Ugly Stick fly rod has the muscle to pull second run reds out of the Kenai current. I go with 100 yards of 30lb backing, fly line, 40lbs mono from the fly line to a swivel, and 20lb mono to the "fly".
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

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    Member neverborn's Avatar
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    rod for red's not fly fishing + 100 totally agree with MNViking
    This land is your land, this land is my land

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    Member oldmil007's Avatar
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    This is some good info guys, thanks for the input.

    I'm a little like Pike Palace when he wrote "Have no idea what im doing.....", except I had no idea that I had no idea what I'm doing. The info here on this site has been great and may have remedied my situation a bit over the last year and a half.

    - Jay

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    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akflyfisher View Post
    Go with an 8wt reddington red fly outfit. Comes with everything you need. Rod, Reel, Backing, and line. It is a great beginners setup. I spend a lot of time fishing for reds and this is what I tell all beginners and have yet to have anyone say I pointed them in the wrong direction.
    That's some really sound advice. Rep +1

    I bought the same outfit for my ex a few years back for flippin' reds. She ended up with the rod, but I ended up with the reel, and it's become one of the spares I hand out to family and friends when they visit from outside. The reel has had no trouble dealing with Kenai reds and has brought plenty to hand.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  18. #18
    Member bigcox's Avatar
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    Flippin for reds is flossing your own teeth. All you're really doing is putting the line between the top and bottom mouths of the fish. IMO, to best rod to have is the Fred Meyer Lamiglas special. I can't remember the model, but it is the green fly rods they sell. All you really need is an awesome drag system on your reel and enough weight to tap the bottom. I've stopped using my "nice" rods flipping as I've broken enough Lamiglass rods then I can speak of flipping for reds. Trust me, it's all about getting in the right location and how much weight you have on your line to catch Reds. How much weight depends on the current and the specific area you fish. If you figure that out, you will catch fish, I guarantee it.

    Fish On!
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    You really cannot beat the real for the price. I have yet to see one fail.

    Even though the heavy ugly sticks will work, and less likely to break you loose a lot of feel and when you are flossing, sensitivity is the key and will result in more hook ups.

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