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Thread: Trolling Etiquette Questions?

  1. #1
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    Default Trolling Etiquette Questions?

    I have been pumping you guys for tips on trolling (bait, flashers, leaders, gps coordinates (), etc.) and certainly appreciate the info I have gotten. It got me thinking though that I should probably get some tips on Trolling Etiquette as well? I would like to think that I have courtesy in "tight quarters" (i.e., crappie fishing, bass fishing, lake/river fishing, etc.) but I am also not meek when it comes to fishing what is not being fished. Frankly, I just do not get in to areas or situations where Trolling Etiquette is a concern.....and therefore need some pointers.

    In general I am asking for some tips on how I prevent the "Ol' One Finger Salute" in K-Bay/Cook Inlet? Specifically I am asking the "Standard Operating Procedure" when I hook up...I am thinking that I just do not throw the boat in to neutral till I land the fish and then just start fishing again??...on the flip side, what is the "Standard Operating Procedure" if the boat in front of me hooks up......do I always take the inside track and give the boat an out?

    Thanks, P-geek

  2. #2
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    i would hazard to say you will have all the room you need.
    except for the derby it is generally not too crowded. most of the spots that hold fish have plenty of room to manuever, fishing single-handed i generally DO put the boat in neutral until i've landed (or lost ) the fish.
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  3. #3

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    Basically, treat it like a road. Keep the other guys to your left. Don't crowd them. When you hook up, pull your net, so people know not to drive over you. Don't spend 15 minutes chasing a 20lb king through the other boats too. That gets old when the attention whores feel like they need to chase small kings around and make all the other boats move. A big king? Chase all you want, but they'll usually take you out to deep water.


    And most importantly, when you are pulling up to other boats, don't wake them. I had several non residents who brought their sport boats up last year who would want to do drive by's at 50 yards, to see what I was catching.. I can't tell you how much that pisses me off, as the wake just rocks the people fishing. I almost tossed a gaff hook through one guys windshield.

  4. #4
    Charterboat Operator kodiakcombo's Avatar
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    Great question, I dont guide anywhere else, usually no other boats around when i fish with clients. I always wanted to run up to the winter derby but figured the bumper fishing is out of my league.

    Here we had a school teacher turn fishing guide, he learned to follow me and one day he drove over my clients line with a king on and we lost the king. The next day while trollling over pinicales he was right behind me turn for turn, I told the crew to bring the balls on the downrigger to 10ft! they said we're hooking up at 35, politely I insisted 10ft. seconds later the crew said, look he hooked up a double! I said really? a minute or so later a call on the radio comes in from the teacher asking if I had any spare down rigger weights. I didnt.

    I want to know what is done to the boat that cuts a line?
    Providing trips for multilpe species for over 20 yrs
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  5. #5
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    yep, we have some pretty good kelp beds around here... follow too close and you never know what might happen...
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

  6. #6

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    P-geek Not a hole lot in the way of etiquette here in CI ,maybe more like common courtesy.Some of the marker fishing and tide rips will get pretty crowded at times. First and formost would be the safety factor.Try to leave youself an out,and keep an eye on the situation, witch on rare occations might involve a full stop and all lines up.Boat hooked up should have right of way as they will be some what restricted in there abilty to manuver. After hook up I prefer to leave the boat in gear till I get the situation under control(down wind, down tide and balls up) this will usually keep the fish away from the cables and increase your chance for mutiple hookups.Things can get pretty jiggy after hook up,and an extra set of eyes keeping a look out for trouble is a big help.All this being said, things happen.We`re all generally pretty friendly and watch out for each other.Be safe.Have fun.Fishon!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    And most importantly, when you are pulling up to other boats, don't wake them. I had several non residents who brought their sport boats up last year who would want to do drive by's at 50 yards, to see what I was catching.. I can't tell you how much that pisses me off, as the wake just rocks the people fishing. I almost tossed a gaff hook through one guys windshield.
    Around here it is the Seadoos.......You can be sitting on anchor in the middle of nowhere and you can see them coming from across the lake.....just to see what you are doing! And it is not so bad that they came down the port side.....they want to check out the view from starboard side as well.

    Funny story......my fishing partner was waiting for me at the boat ramp after parking the truck. I was watching him pick stuff up on the bank and putting it in his shirt pocket as I was pulling back in to get him. After he gets settled in I ask him what he was was doing. He pulls a small handful of slug sized rocks out and just smiles as he shows them to me.......he hates Seadoos!

  8. #8
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    no jet skis on k-bay at all.
    they are not allowed.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
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  9. #9
    Member Milo's Avatar
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    It want a good read P-geek, go find a Great Lakes salmon forum and post that question. You'll get "answers".
    If you've been there, done that - you have nothing to worry about on K-bay.

  10. #10
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    Here's a few rules I've learned:

    1. If you see a solitary boat fishing in the middle of nowhere, make a bee line straight for him. He must know what he's doing and he's surely sitting on top of fish. Don't slow down until you're about 50 yards from him and make sure you pull up within voice range. Ask him how many he's got, what he's using and what depth.

    2. You see a boat(s) working a point. You're not interested in this spot (e.g. - u don't suscribe to rule #1). Make sure you cut between all the boats and shore - no need to go around them on the outside as you'd be wasting about a cup of fuel. My "real" rule is that if they are running a a full cruise speed and are within throwing range, I'll sacrafice a bananna weight.

    3. The bite is on and you hook up in middle of the floatilla. Make sure you're drag is really loose and let the fish him make really nice, long runs. Everyone will think you've got a 40#er on. Take your time playing the fish as it's your time to be a fishing legend!

    4. If your in a bigger boat (30' plus) in the middle of the floatilla, don't worry about anything. "Might makes right". Put the boat on autopilot and drink a nice toddy inside. Steel or Aluminum hulls rule!!!

  11. #11

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    Excellent LG. Don't forget to pull your net with for every single humpy (pink salmon) you hook into. Just warms my heart when I move for a boat that pulled the net for a humpy.

    Funny story:

    About 5 years ago I was guiding for a lodge. The other guide running the partner boat was a brand new guide. It was tough fishing and we were fishing in 200ft of water off of Roller, on Noyes Island. So, my partner boat kept pulling the net. Every time I looked over at him, he was netting another salmon. I got him on the radio, and he told me that he was up to 12 cohos.. What?! My clients only had 4 cohos! So, I started working my butt off. Changing leaders, smaller hooks, fresh bait, etc.. It was the most frustrating day of my life. And his net kept waving! By the end of the day, we had scratched out 14 cohos. Tough day of fishing. My partner boat had left a few hours earlier due to having limited out. It was driving me crazy as we were fishing the same spot!

    So, after a long day of torture I had back to the lodge. I'm unloading my 14 cohos and our halibut, shaking my head that I had just gotten my butt handed to me. The fish cutter walks up to me with a smile on his face.. He says, "dude, the other boat came in with 1 coho and 23 pinks!"

  12. #12
    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by L. G. View Post
    Here's a few rules I've learned:

    1. If you see a solitary boat fishing in the middle of nowhere, make a bee line straight for him. He must know what he's doing and he's surely sitting on top of fish. Don't slow down until you're about 50 yards from him and make sure you pull up within voice range. Ask him how many he's got, what he's using and what depth.

    2. You see a boat(s) working a point. You're not interested in this spot (e.g. - u don't suscribe to rule #1). Make sure you cut between all the boats and shore - no need to go around them on the outside as you'd be wasting about a cup of fuel. My "real" rule is that if they are running a a full cruise speed and are within throwing range, I'll sacrafice a bananna weight.

    3. The bite is on and you hook up in middle of the floatilla. Make sure you're drag is really loose and let the fish him make really nice, long runs. Everyone will think you've got a 40#er on. Take your time playing the fish as it's your time to be a fishing legend!

    4. If your in a bigger boat (30' plus) in the middle of the floatilla, don't worry about anything. "Might makes right". Put the boat on autopilot and drink a nice toddy inside. Steel or Aluminum hulls rule!!!
    Sounds like Silver Tactics for Reserection Bay in the Pony Cove/Agnes Cove/Cheval Straits Area>

  13. #13

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    Other than the Winter King Derby, it's a pretty big ocean. I don't know who's "right" and who's "wrong", but when I'm trolling parallel to a shoreline (in sort of a loose group), there always seems to be someone trying to troll in a series of shorter runs perpendicular to the shore. Inevitably, you will "cross paths". I usually give way and have never had a confrontation, but I've seen some crazy **** happen when someone doesn't, even in salt water. A place that can get kind of crowded is off the beach at Deep Creek when silvers are running. I haven't fished there in a long time, but it was always good for some boat to boat "combat".

  14. #14

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    270. By any chance was that for Catch a King Charters?

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskanap View Post
    270. By any chance was that for Catch a King Charters?
    No. Catch a King is a great outfit.

  16. #16

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    Ya 270 they are great. I know Rich and he told me about a guide they called pinky. For bringing in a boat load of pinks.

  17. #17

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    You'll get made fun of for a really long time for bringing in humpies, that's for sure!

  18. #18
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    Default In Langauge I Can Understand.....

    Quote Originally Posted by L. G. View Post
    Here's a few rules I've learned:

    1. If you see a solitary boat fishing in the middle of nowhere, make a bee line straight for him. He must know what he's doing and he's surely sitting on top of fish. Don't slow down until you're about 50 yards from him and make sure you pull up within voice range. Ask him how many he's got, what he's using and what depth.

    2. You see a boat(s) working a point. You're not interested in this spot (e.g. - u don't suscribe to rule #1). Make sure you cut between all the boats and shore - no need to go around them on the outside as you'd be wasting about a cup of fuel. My "real" rule is that if they are running a a full cruise speed and are within throwing range, I'll sacrafice a bananna weight.

    3. The bite is on and you hook up in middle of the floatilla. Make sure you're drag is really loose and let the fish him make really nice, long runs. Everyone will think you've got a 40#er on. Take your time playing the fish as it's your time to be a fishing legend!

    4. If your in a bigger boat (30' plus) in the middle of the floatilla, don't worry about anything. "Might makes right". Put the boat on autopilot and drink a nice toddy inside. Steel or Aluminum hulls rule!!!
    L.G. my friend.......you have nailed it with the written word!!!


    Quote Originally Posted by L. G. View Post
    it's your time to be a fishing legend!
    I am already thinking of the picture pose......maybe a straight on with the arms fully extended towards the camera............

    Thanks, P-geek

  19. #19

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    L.G. You are deffinetly from Juneau

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