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Thread: Serious "What rod weight" question

  1. #1
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    Default Serious "What rod weight" question

    OK, I'm a rookie.
    I have a nice 4 pc 5wt I picked up for small water & grayling in the high lakes. An OK 2 pc 6wt for float tubing lakes.
    Now I'm looking for something for the Kenai. Probably reds & silvers, occasional king (probably what I will intentionaly fish least just because opportunity is more limited), & maybe rainbows on the upper.
    Looking at St Croix Imperial 2 pc 9' in 8 or 9wt, or G Loomis 2 pc G1298 9' in 9 or 10wt.
    Recomendations?
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

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    Member BlueMoose's Avatar
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    Seriously :-) You know to be honest I have been fishing with a stick for a long time and I still do not have a complete answer.

    I think the Loomis Rods are over priced and I don't completely care for the St. Croix sticks. We have Sage Nuts, TFO nuts, Orvis Nuts, Reddington Nuts, etc..... Nuts

    So if I were to provide you an answer it would be which Rod Type matches your fishing style as an example Full Flex, Tip Flex, Mid Flex etc.. and does that type of fly rod meet your needs. Being your on the Kenai you might consider going to a 9'6" stick as well.

    I would not chase anything in mid stream on the kenai unless it was an 8W and that is a losing battle in a crowd some days. If I know I were targeting Bows I would go down to a 7W and not exceed an 8W and it would be 9'6" tip flex or fast action rod for that type of water.

    I am not helping sorry. Any WHO! Cast them both see which one meets your needs and the choice will be easier.

    Good Luck!

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    Thanks Moose.

    So far I have no fishing style! When I say rookie, I mean it.
    Both rods are similarily priced (around $130 or I wouldn't be looking at them) but are not in a "cast before you buy" type of location.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    your choices look good... I'm gonna pick me up a beulah bluewater I think they'd be great for salmon (and hopefully halibut)
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  5. #5

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    Vance,
    a good all around salmon rod is indeed a 10wt rod. Plenty of action and control for sockeye and Silvers and enough back bone for most Kings. Consider a TFO Ticr in a 10wt which has held up well for many of our clients. The rod also comes with an outstanding lifetime warranty. The Imperials and the 1298s (although great rods) can be a bit delicate at times depending on the circumstances. For trout on the Kenai, go with either a 7wt or 8wt. Tight lines!

  6. #6

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    I agree with the last post on the TFO's. Should be able to find something in your price range and they have a lifetime warranty. I have a 6 wt and an 8 wt. Both are 4 piece and make great pack rods. The 8 wt. should be good for most everything except kings. Sportsman's Warehouse usually has a selection of them.

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    If the target is reds with the usual chuck and duck, most anything will work. Spenard Lumber and the box stores sell conduit that would serve nicely. sarc/ off

    Most any 8-9-10 would serve for reds, and the faster the water and thicker the crowds the heavier would be better.

    The issue on the Kenai or any large river with a strong current is getting the fly down to fish level, keeping it there, and making a decent drag-free presentation. Not terribly difficult if done from a moving boat, but can be nearly impossible with a short light rod from shore. Fished one of the braided outlets from the Kenai into Skilak many years ago from a bar with a variety of spinners with and without weights, then weighted Okie drifters. Spent several hours at it with nothing. Got in the Avon and motored up till the skeg bottomed, dropped a lightly weighted drifter in over the side, no cast, and had a hook-up every time within 10'. This was in the '70's so different regs and vastly different fishing pressure, but the two of us released a lot of fish and kept one deep-hook for lunch.

    One issue driving cost will be how far you want to cast how heavy a fly and line, knowing that it needs to get on or near the bottom quickly given the current, and how much room you will have for a standard back-cast. Given Kenai bank conditions and crowds you might be a candidate for a Spey rod. Casts a bit different than a traditional one-hander, but has a huge learning curve. But then you are simply awesome when you master it.

    If you want a rod to chuck lead at reds, try Trustworthy, especially their 8wt combos and spool it up with mono. If you want a true fly casting setup try Kenai Cache or others, but think about the limitations. Backcast length, weight, sink-tip, casting distance, water depth, and flow rate to get to the fishy water. If you can float the river and fish from the boat or the bars none of this may matter. After you sort that out, then maybe fast tip or slow, and then picking a rod.

    Best wishes for success.
    Terry

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Guys I've fished with also fishing 8/9/10wt fly rods on Kenai R main stem- with the heavier rods also favored for getting the fish to hand quicker - to release in better shape.

    Also, not sure what rods are stocked Kenai/Soldotna way, but several Anchorage area fly shops now carry Echo rods. I hear they're good values; lots of performance for price. Warranty: I guess Tim Rajeff pioneered Echo rods in much the same way that Lefty Kreh pioneered affordable performance fly rods with TFO. The warranty is similar - lifetime for the original owner but you send a $25-$35 check with your broken rod for repair/replacement: http://www.rajeffsports.com/echo_warranty.php, http://www.templeforkflyrods.com/

    Good luck.

  10. #10
    Member BlueMoose's Avatar
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    I think the data provided should help basically we are stating 10W for Salmon if you don:t wish to play with your food and an 8W for fishing bows. You have one rod you wish to buy looked to the 10W to ensure you cover your needs and use it to fish Bows as well. You know some people are stupid me included on some days. I think it is fun to chase silvers and chums on a 4W some days. "Hey Don't laugh" I do it all the time site fish to the medium size fish it's a hoot oh and not on the Kenia. Min Rod on the main stream for me is an
    8W unless I am in a boat and drift fishing then a 9'6" 7W with and little longer fighting butt.

    Good Look Vance.

  11. #11
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Based on what you've said, if you're thinking this rod will see mostly salmon use - go with a 9 wt. If you're thinking 50/50 or more towards trout, drop down to an 8 wt.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

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    I may have this year figured out.
    A guy on another forum is making me a screaming deal (basically shipping) on a nice 10 wt Reddington. I'll get that setup this year I(anyone got a nice used real to part with reasonable?) & maybe next years purchase will be an 8wt.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

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    i have had a 10wt reddington for a few years now its a tuff rod to learn for me its a real stiff fast action, it has landed pinks and silvers for me but still no kings yet but i have no doubt it will have no problem with a king i have an okuma integrityI 10-11 on it and it seems to be a good reel for fairly cheep i think i got mine for about $120 new but just googled it and you can get them for $45-90 now.

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    Just orderecd a new Alla, Alpha reel. Keep hearing good things about them so I figured I'd give it a try.
    Thanks for the heads up on the action akscotty. Maybe I'll try & do my learning on my lighter rods.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  15. #15

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    I let the guys who know the river kerteke this. If your tausing nymps and double hook rigs you want a longer moderate actionto keep the loops more open, while a fast is needed for throwing big streamer patterens. I prefer a 9' for streamers like the XPLxi it will handle Floating lines and is extremely suited to heavy fast sink streamer express lines Mine is a 890RPLxi and has landed many 38-42 inch salmon Kings & Atlantics. And for nymph rigs a moderate 10' works great I use a GL4 #1207 mainly for steelhead and atlantic salmon. I will up the rod weight a noch for fast water. For a 9' and maybe a 9'6" look at a saltwater rod the usualy have more back bone down low to better handle large fish.

    Also get a big tuff reel that hold 200' of backing for those migrating fish. A momentum #4 is a nice reel I did start with a STH reel cheap but it worked mine was a #3 caset type.

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    i think the most versatile rod for the kenai is a fast-action (i.e. tip flex) 7 wt with some extra length to it. i use an 11 foot switch rod but a 10 foot single-hander would serve much of the same purposes. 7 weights are more fun (as compared to 8 and 9 weights) for rainbows and dollies and can still handle most reds and silvers. you will not, however, be able to land many kings on a 7 weight. i'd say you'd need a 10 or 11 weight for those guys. having a second, bigger rod also comes in handy for fishing heavy rigs for reds in fast water.

    agreed on the echo rods. great value and have plenty of power for you to grow into.

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