Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 29

Thread: .303 Enfield

  1. #1

    Default .303 Enfield

    So I inherited a .303 Enfield rifle from my father-in-law. Not knowing too much about calibers besides some of the most common ones, I was wondering is the .303 caliber a common caliber on most sporting good shelves? Also, would this be a good rifle to have my son use for a hunting rifle? He would be hunting black bear, wolves, other small game animals. Any advice?

  2. #2
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    It's fairly easy to find .303. Three Bears here in Kenai has them as does about every gun shop I've ever been in. Many thousand of deer, bear, elk, caribou and moose have fallen to the .303 (not to mention men). It was equivalent to the .30.06 in popularity across the commonwealth countries and wasn't too unpopular in the US either. I have one and I love the smooth action. Would it be a good first rifle for your son? Well, if it is still in its original furniture it is a heavy old beast. You can scope it, but if it has the orignal military sights, that'll take some getting used to. I'm very sure many kids have carried and shot .303, I did as a teenager, but I sure wouldn't say it is an ideal beginner's rifle.

  3. #3
    Member Milo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,472

    Default

    What make/model are you looking at? What do the markings say? I'd like to see a picture.

    I inherited one from my wife's grandpa. It's been sporterized, aka bubba-ized, but still kind of a cool, old gun. Depending on model, they were once the highest manufactured gun in the world. Sporterized ones were dumped on the market dirt cheap in 50s-60s. Most enfields have no real value. I intend to kill something with it someday, just for the sake of doing it. Maybe a caribou or a black bear and then pass it on.

    Can you get .303 ammo? Yes, its common enough. A little pricey for what you get because its not terribly popular.
    Can you hunt with it? Sure, I'd be willing to use it up to and including moose.
    Is it a good kids gun? No, I broke mine out of the closet a week ago and my 15yo shot it a few times. His reaction - "I hate shooting this gun". He's shot enough other rifles, so he has a basis of comparison.

    My advice would be to clean it up (I'm sure it needs it), and see how it shoots. If it shoots well, keep it and use it just because its a cool old gun with maybe some family history. Pass it along to your kid someday, but there are better choices for him now.

    If you want to find out more about these, there are Lee Enfield forums on the net and those guys are nuts about them and happy to help.

  4. #4
    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    PANC
    Posts
    1,117

    Default

    Post a picture! Enfields are cool. I always regret selling the one I bought for $125. Very accurate, mild recoil. It isn't a 30-06 speed wise, but it will kill moose, deer, caribou, and black bears no problem.

  5. #5
    Member .338-06's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,045

    Default

    I was lucky enough to pick up a sporterized .303 Jungle Carbine about 12 years ago for $150. All I knew when I bought it was that it had a nice Fajen stock and I liked how it handled. A guy I know who is nuts about WWII guns pointed out all the little features that made it a Jungle carbine, he thinks it even has the orginal finish-black paint! I haven't shot it for years, think I'll take it out this weekend.
    I may be slow, but I get where I'm going!

  6. #6
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    759

    Default

    this is an enfield of mine, original, with blued metal and walnut stock. the model no4 mk1 is a longbranch model from canada that was built in 1951. it is an excellent shooter and is suitable for most alaskan game. heavy by today's standards, it is absolutly reliable and will function in all conditions.

    there was a time when this rifle was the standard for the military, the mounties, and was found in every hunting camp north of the USA. it killed game ( including elephants ) everywhere the brits called home.

    in the factory loadings i recommend the 180gr soft point, as it penetrates and is a deadly killer. military ammunition is still available, and is reasonable in cost.
    happy trails.
    jh

  7. #7

    Default

    Here you go folks. Here is a photo of the rifle. Don't know if you can see the writing. It says 1922 Enfield Lee, SHTLE, V. So, I am guessing this is the Mark V model?
    DSC04052.jpgDSC04050.jpg

  8. #8
    Member Milo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,472

    Default

    Short Magazine Lee Enfield No 1, Mark V. Sporterized - stock, sights, probably more. Looks like its in decent condition.
    Heres a link to an image of an original rifle: http://www.buymilsurp.com/images/P7-14A.jpg

    Take it out and play with it on the range.

  9. #9
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Ah the 30-30 of Canada, 303 was found in every hunting camp across Canada for years, as ubiquitous as 30-30 was in the US. Iíve often heard more moose have fallen to 303 than anything just as more deer fell to the 30-30, I donít know if itís true but sounds reasonable to me. Enfields are fine guns, maybe the fastest bolt action ever made. They are still quite common as surplus though quality has gone down and beat up examples from India are often what I see around these days. 303 is the safe way to go because many of the 308 Enfields are rechambered 303s that may or may not shoot well. 303 is common ammo most places and power wise itís just a tad south of 30-06.

    Kids gun? Depends on the kid, they are heavy but about indestructible so if you have a strapping young buck that beats the snot out of gear Enfield could be for him. If you have an average video gaming kid of today that you are trying to get excited about humping through the woods to shoot a moose 11lbs of gun/scope/ammo may be the wrong approach.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  10. #10
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default Don't undersell the .303

    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    Ah the 30-30 of Canada, 303 was found in every hunting camp across Canada for years, as ubiquitous as 30-30 was in the US. Iíve often heard more moose have fallen to 303 than anything just as more deer fell to the 30-30, I donít know if itís true but sounds reasonable to me. Enfields are fine guns, maybe the fastest bolt action ever made. They are still quite common as surplus though quality has gone down and beat up examples from India are often what I see around these days. 303 is the safe way to go because many of the 308 Enfields are rechambered 303s that may or may not shoot well. 303 is common ammo most places and power wise itís just a tad south of 30-06.

    Kids gun? Depends on the kid, they are heavy but about indestructible so if you have a strapping young buck that beats the snot out of gear Enfield could be for him. If you have an average video gaming kid of today that you are trying to get excited about humping through the woods to shoot a moose 11lbs of gun/scope/ammo may be the wrong approach.
    While the .303 may have been as ubiquitous as the .30.30, the comparison ends there. In balistics the .303 is more comparable to the .30.06.
    My sporterized .303, which looks remarkably like the OP's, weighs less than 8 pounds WITH scope, leather sling and full magazine. Not bad for a milsurp rifle with an external magazine. Indeed it weighs less than the Win. Model 70 .30.06 I carried for years.
    However, if I was going to get a kid a rifle for toting in the woods I would look for a .270 0r .308 Savage or Stevens with a plastic stock.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    893

    Default

    Yep. The .303 was Britain's (and Canada's) .30-06, going back almost 100 years now.

    Every po-dunk would-be bush bunny in the Yukon Territory had one back in the 70s. We used to pay on average $25-$50 each for them, and they almost always came with military surplus ammunition back then; including tracers and piercing. Fun stuff. The No. IV Jungle carbine, with its bugle-shaped flash suppressor at the muzzle was -the- preferred Enfield in the Yukon back then, as it was -almost- sporterized in its stock configuration.

    I have an old Enfield that's now parkerized and has a scout scope on it, sporter replacement bbl with relatively tight twists, sporter sights, and a polished bolt. I would've put a standard scope on it, but the rear of the receiver was too ground down to mount a standard scope without spending a BUNCH of money on machine-work.

    When my eyes worked well, and I could use open iron sights, it was a real tack-driver. It now belongs to my son, though his interest in hunting is variable, so it may go to my youngest son, as my daughter wants to learn to hunt with a bow instead of a rifle.

    Pretty much anything you can drop with a .30-06 is droppable with that piece, and if it's like my old beater, it's nolonger quite as heavy as it was when it left England, or where ever it was initially minted.

    See if the bbl has 'Santa Fe' written on it anywhere. Your front sights tell me that you may still have the original bbl, though the one I have came with replacement sporter parts all around.

    Sportsman's Warehouse in Fbks, as well as Frontier Outfitters have both had .303 ammunition on a fairly regular basis, though lately it's been priced a bit more than the .30-06 in comparable loads; probably just due to becoming less in-demand/more obscure these days.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default

    I'm surprised that it isn't a Mk II since it was made so late and in Canada.

    The Mk 4 are unrated military guns - they have a lot going or them when you really study their features. They are relatively simple, short stroke, short lift, controlled feed of course, and have a chamber that isn't hidden inside a large receiver ring. The safety is on the left side right under the shooters thumb where it should be.

    I've got a Mk 5 that someone sporterized by removing the flash hidder and changing the rear sight. It makes a real neat little bolt rifle bit its worth a lot more in orginal state so I'm going to restore it. It was made in 1944 so it's a real WWII gun; not made after the war as many were.

    Quote Originally Posted by pinehavensredrocket View Post
    this is an enfield of mine, original, with blued metal and walnut stock. the model no4 mk1 is a longbranch model from canada that was built in 1951. it is an excellent shooter and is suitable for most alaskan game. heavy by today's standards, it is absolutly reliable and will function in all conditions.

    there was a time when this rifle was the standard for the military, the mounties, and was found in every hunting camp north of the USA. it killed game ( including elephants ) everywhere the brits called home.

    in the factory loadings i recommend the 180gr soft point, as it penetrates and is a deadly killer. military ammunition is still available, and is reasonable in cost.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    893

    Default

    My error; the Jungle Carbine was the No. V. Ooops.

  14. #14
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    While the .303 may have been as ubiquitous as the .30.30, the comparison ends there. In balistics the .303 is more comparable to the .30.06.
    Yup, that's why I said "303 is common ammo most places and power wise itís just a tad south of 30-06."
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  15. #15
    Member Milo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,472

    Default

    Any body know where you can pick up an original 10 round magazine for a 1917 smle/shtle no1 mark III* for a reasonable price (less than $60)? The magazine I have has been cut down to 5 rounds, and I wouldn't mind an original.

  16. #16
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    893

    Default

    There are quite a few after-market (mostly Chinese-made) replacement mags for the 7 and 10-rd. magazines. Some aren't very well made, and some are okay.

    There used to be a business called 'All Things British' years ago. I think they also went by 'Victoria Trading Co.' I used to get Enfield parts, etc., through them. But the last time I tried to find them (ironically, for a .303 magazine), I wasn't able to.

    Sarco is another outfit that might carry them, but I'd ask if they're original or Chinese. My guess is that four out of every five you find these days, unless they come from someone's gun cabinet, are Chinese-made.

    Trying to think of the various gun parts places I've done business with like Jack First, but it's late, and my mind's stumbling a bit right now.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    893

    Default

    You might also try gunpartsonline.com (who I can't vouch for) and Numrich (who I can say does okay).

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    893

    Default No idea about manufacturer on these


  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default

    Just remembered I've got an unfinished Fajen or Bishop stock set for a Lee Enfield laying around somewhere. Probably for a No.4 but I'll have to check. These used to be popular in the 60s when you could still get the guns for $10 or so at W.T. Grants. Wlamart, etc. as well as gun shows.

    If anyone has any interest I'll dig the wood out.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •