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Thread: using coyote vocalization calls

  1. #1
    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    Default using coyote vocalization calls

    Alright I bought a foxpro firestorm this winter and I have these extra sounds, like female coyote whimper, female yodle howl, a couple of female bark howles, and a female challenge howl. I know we are now getting into the breeding season and was hoping to use these to my advantage but I have no idea how to employ them or how long to play them etc...
    Now I know rabbits are food and i use that one a lot too but I have had very limited luck this year on anything and was looking for something else to try out.
    Thanks for the help

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    Default Bumpin Tony to the top cause I wan to know too

    Seems like a good fair question to me. I don't have a clue cause I've only used screaming rabbits in the past. I could not tell you the first thing about talking coyote. Maybe somebody will get off their duff and give us all an education.

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    Member lab man's Avatar
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    I feel like one of the problems with using coyote vocalizations is that once you start playing coyote noises, it's most likely the only animal you're going to call in. I've only had luck using coyote howls twice. Once was almost in the city of Girdwood itself, and I called in a pack of yotes by barking and doing some short howls with my mouth. The second time a pack of four a five started howling after I opened up with a rabbit call. I switched to coyote noises, and out of coyote pups, female coyote, dying coyote, and coyote locater, they were only interested in the locator call.

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    I talk to coyotes all the time and have for a long time. I can tell you the following tip: don't ever start a stand with a coyote sound of any kind. It will chase away any lower preds like foxes and lynx and may even run off a submissive minded coyote. The main reason I use coyote talk is to verify the presence of coyote in areas where I am calling. I may be at a stand for some time being a screaming rabbit and nothing comes in. Before leaving I will start up with some sparse coyote language and listen. Often they will talk back. Sometimes from far away sometimes from the trees right in front of you. It let's you know they are there and may have busted you. There is something to be learned from it. Before you leave the stand try to figure out why they did not come in. Maybe try calling them in again, but be careful not educate them or they are lost forever. I makes me me feel better knowing that coyotes are hovering around out there without coming in, especially when I'm on a long dry spell. In Alaska I have only had a coyote show itself in he open over coyote talk. It was a large male that came in to a female howl in March. Good luck.

  5. #5

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    Good tips. Thanks Lab man and Oats. I might get out today for a few sets. After I take the wife and kids to go shoot their bows.

  6. #6

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    Lab man, if a coyote howls back, you're in good shape. If a pair or a pack light up and bark and yip back at your call you have been busted, might as well sneek on out and go somewhere else.

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    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info guys.
    Oats I tried to send you a PM but your box is full.

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    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    So now that Lynx season is all but over and on the pen we dont have any foxes (why I dont know they are everywhere else) and I am basicly targeting coyotes now would you open up with a locator howl or some other type of howl and see what happens. What would a sequence be like? Howl for 2 minutes and sit quiet for a few then try howl again and continue like this? I usually sit about 20 minutes and I am moving should I sit longer? Will you usually get a resposce if they are in the area? So many questions so little space.

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    Sorry about that Tony, I didn't know the box was full. I cleared out some space.

    In Alaska, I don't ever open with coyote talk. I always try to appeal to the predator in them first and try to draw scavenger birds in to add credibility to the setup. As far as length of stand, that is a debate amongst callers. There are places that I know over history have produced regularly. I spend more time at these stops, maybe 30-45 minutes, particularly if they are lynx haunts or I have seem cat tracks as cats seem to take their time coming in. Typically I am the hit and run type. My experience has shown me that I have more production if I cover as many stands as possible during a hunt trip.

  10. #10

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    Oh BTW, I just re-read your post. Years ago there were tons of fox on the peninsula and very few coyotes. As the coyote population has established itself they have outcompeted the foxes. There are almost no foxes now. Lynx are less affected as they will climb a tree to evade coyotes.

  11. #11

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    Yep the time for vocals is just begining. Try a soft food call, wait 5 minutes, then try a greeting howl a couple times, if you get a responce go back at them with what they are giving you. If you don't get a answer, wait 5 minutes and try again. Don't overcall, give a break, you may not get a reply seems to be the norm but they may be coming in. When you think you are done, stand up slowly and really have a good look around. Most times I have smacked them they are sneaking in...ex..sitting on side hill..well no yotes here..turn around and here is one 20 yards away sitting on his butt watching me! They love watching you from brush edges! If you start hearing short howls and a lot of barking you are busted, they have seen or heard something they don't like, they tend to repeat it several times. Caution on the last sentence...yotes are very territial, they may challange you, sounds like the "busted" call, but more aggressive and not repeated as often, send it back to them! You get that working and you are eating yote stew! Time? up to 1 hr..Desertdog

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by desertdog View Post
    Yep the time for vocals is just begining. Try a soft food call, wait 5 minutes, then try a greeting howl a couple times, if you get a responce go back at them with what they are giving you. If you don't get a answer, wait 5 minutes and try again. Don't overcall, give a break, you may not get a reply seems to be the norm but they may be coming in. When you think you are done, stand up slowly and really have a good look around. Most times I have smacked them they are sneaking in...ex..sitting on side hill..well no yotes here..turn around and here is one 20 yards away sitting on his butt watching me! They love watching you from brush edges! If you start hearing short howls and a lot of barking you are busted, they have seen or heard something they don't like, they tend to repeat it several times. Caution on the last sentence...yotes are very territial, they may challange you, sounds like the "busted" call, but more aggressive and not repeated as often, send it back to them! You get that working and you are eating yote stew! Time? up to 1 hr..Desertdog
    You must be located in the Lower 48.

  13. #13

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    My BAD! It's just what works for me..... Desertdog

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by desertdog View Post
    My BAD! It's just what works for me..... Desertdog
    Hey man, don't take that the wrong way. I was asking if my assumption is correct? I do a bit of calling outside Alaska and I know it is totally different. For years I have been taking trips to other states and use completely different strategies when hunting there. Any info is good info. I was just curious whether you were using these tactics in AK or down south.

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    Member WaterWolf's Avatar
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    I pretty sure Loren is down in Kenai.
    I'm Pro-Pike.

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    I have hunted coyotes in Arizona and up here in Alaska. I use the coyote threat bark. Let me explain. Many times I have had them come into 75-80 yards, cant see them, but know they are there and they give a solid aggressive bark. One of two options is going to happen. First, they are going to tuck their tail and run. The other is they will engage in a vocal spat that usually leads to them coming in close looking like a monkey riding a football.

    This is my experience.

    Loren

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    Member lab man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reese Outdoors View Post
    I have hunted coyotes in Arizona and up here in Alaska. I use the coyote threat bark. Let me explain. Many times I have had them come into 75-80 yards, cant see them, but know they are there and they give a solid aggressive bark. One of two options is going to happen. First, they are going to tuck their tail and run. The other is they will engage in a vocal spat that usually leads to them coming in close looking like a monkey riding a football.

    This is my experience.

    Loren
    I'm living in Arizona right now while I'm going to school. I've gone out once for coyote here in Flagstaff and managed to call one in, but I would appreciate any advice you have for hunting down here.

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    Head south down towards the Yuma area, specifically near Dateland. It is prime for coyotes. Focus on the north side of the highway near the orange groves and alpha fields.

    Loren

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