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Thread: Preparing a boat for a LONG haul

  1. #1
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    Question Preparing a boat for a LONG haul

    Good morning.

    I will have an aluminum boat transported from the lower 48 in the next few weeks. For those who have done this, what would you recommend as far as preparing the boat for the long haul?

    Some questions I have are:

    1. To shrink wrap or not to wrap...that is the question!
    2. Board up the windows or not
    3. Is it necessary to use some sort of brackets to support outboard motors?
    4. How best to protect the haul from rocks, etc

    Also any list of Do's and Don't will be appreciated.

    Regards,

    yhc

  2. #2
    Member Ripface's Avatar
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    I would board the windows. Keep in mind that in Yukon, Canada the roads have 100's of miles of continuous bumps caused by the upheaval of the ground from thawing and freezing. I would have the trailer hitch turned up, instead of hanging down to get maximum clearance. I would also make sure the engine is as high up as possible, and yes, reinforce it as much as you can. I think there's about 300 miles of those road humps, and you can see everywhere, on the other sides of the humps, where things have scraped and scratched. As for shrink wrapping, I wouldn't think that's necessary, though you can expect the boat to get as dirty as you can imagine, so you may want to shrink wrap, or spend hours cleaning it afterwards. There will be a great deal of rocks hitting the boat too, so you may want to consider something to protect the high probability hit areas.
    Last edited by Ripface; 02-25-2007 at 10:12.
    "Wine can of their wits the wise beguile, Make the sage frolic, and the serious smile." - Homer, Odyssey

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    The only thing I did when I towed my Sea Sport up here from Washington was to add one of those really nice wide "mud flaps" that hangs underneath the bumper and is as wide as the bumper and can touch the ground.
    If you are worried about window breakage cut up some of those foam sleeping pads and duct tape them over the windows.
    Good luck with your trip.
    Tennessee

  4. #4

    Default To Haines

    I'm planning to pull my boat to Haines and do the inside passage in the next year or two. How is the road between here and there? Is it some of the best or some of the worst?
    What-a-Day
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    Remember: Any fool can be uncomfortable.
    Denny

  5. #5
    Member Arctic Hunter's Avatar
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    Default Hauling up a glass boat in Apr or May

    I will be hauling up a new boat too from Wa. Any recommendation/ideas for a glass boat? I was thinking shrink wrap, but also just reinforcing areas around the hull that might come into contact with road debris.

    Also, like to get any ideas on mileage, gas expense, lodging (I was thinking about pullouts/campgrounds). Whats the best route that gets me home quicker?

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    Mileage? What does your rig weigh on the trailer and what type of truck and motor?
    I have a 2002 Ford Superduty diesel and running down to Washington I averaged 20 mpg and coming back I managed 12 towing.
    Buy as much fuel as you can in the US and carry plently with you if you are as frugal as I am. Cheapest place to buy fuel between here and Bellingham Washington is in Anchorage.
    For lodging I slept in my boat. You can gain a wealth of information by purchasing the "Milepost"
    Tennessee

  7. #7
    Member smwwoody's Avatar
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    One thing you may want to consider is taking the motor off and laying it down inside the boat. it will be much easier on the transom not having that outboard bouncing up and down.

    Woody

  8. #8
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Double check your trailer bearings and make sure you have a good spare. When you see little orange flags on the side of the road SLOW down! It will only take one or two of these then you will get it.

    Put all your expenses on a credit card as the bank will convert it back to USD. Make sure you WATCH them swipe your card as I have had some try to double swip it.

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
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  9. #9
    Member ACBMAN's Avatar
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    Default Shipping a boat in the cold

    Don't know where your boat is coming from but when I had my ACB shipped from southeast Alaska on the Alaska Ferry it was raining when it left and well below freezing here,I'm glad I dropped the outboard motors and opened all my hull plugs or I would of had alot of ice before long.If it's being tranported with the motor(s) up you might want to wrap so water can't get in.

  10. #10

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    Don't travel w/o a copy of the Milepost! when you see orange sticks in the road....slow down! the more you see the slower you go. I personally would check and carry spare tire/bearing/hub just to keep me sane, as stated fuel in Canada is not very cheap. expect at least 1-300 miles of dirt roads and plenty of construction. A big mud flap is a good idea too

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    The Alaska highyway is totally paved. The only place where the roads are dirt are where construction is taking place.
    Last June there was a 5 mile stretch torn up in Canada around Muncho Lake if my memory is correct and about 5-10 miles on the road from Tok to Glennallen.
    Tennessee

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    I brought my fiberglass boat up from Seattle in March of last year. Here is a list of the things I did for my 2600 mile trip to Homer.

    • Shrink wrapped. (I had them come down low on the front to protect against gravel, install a zippered door into the back end so I could access the interior) $400

    • I bought 2 spare tires $250

    • I had the trailer brakes checked out (found out they needed to be replaced) $1200


    My boat wears a 225 hp motor, the only thing I did there was to let the engine down on the travel stops, (no problems). I would check the trailer every time I stopped for gas and at the end of each day. I took 6 days coming up and had a blast. Drive slowly, get some books on tape, and enjoy the view.
    An unarmed person is a victim waiting to happen.

  13. #13
    Member CanCanCase's Avatar
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    Hmm... OP didn't mention size of boat and final destination. For those of us in SouthEast, it's often just as economical (and WAY more fun) to cruise the inside passage. I've brought 15 or so boats up (and eventually back) from SEA to JNU over the years. Anyone who doesn't have the time or experience to bring a small boat up the Inside Passage can also have it barged via AML... most of the new small boats in Juneau show up on the barge.

    -Case

  14. #14
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    They sell a boat bra the would cover the bow of the boat. This will help protect from rocks dings.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  15. #15

    Default Boat Bra

    Where do they get the boat bra? I've see them before but mostly on Thunderjets, I really want one for my boat.

    I was guessing they are custom made.

    Suggestions?

    Thanks

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by dtol View Post
    I'm planning to pull my boat to Haines and do the inside passage in the next year or two. How is the road between here and there? Is it some of the best or some of the worst?
    The stretch between Destruction Bay Yukon and Sutton AK. was the roughest stretch of road by far, than any other stretch on the trip from Seattle to Homer. I was not comfortable running over 45 to 50 mph (sometime down to 20mph) while the other stretch I was pulling 55 to 65 mph.
    An unarmed person is a victim waiting to happen.

  17. #17
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    Default Worst Part

    D278, is right on the the Desrtuction Bay to Sutton AK portion. I drove to Whitehorse last year from Wasilla with a motor home and the heaves are tough. The US side reaaly sucks as they don't have them marked well. The Candian side at least has them almost all marked very well. I can tell you if they have a Orange marker or sign "they mean it" A friend traveling with a pickup made the trip in 12 hours, our 32" mtor home took 17 and I would not do it any faster with the bumps. I would assume pulling a boat woudl be much the same. Not killer on the equipment if you drive with patience and care.

  18. #18

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    That 1/4" mylar bubble insulation (From HomeDepot) made a good cheap bra for my Fish-Rite, used it for 2 trips up & back. On one of my trips I entered the cabin and it was full of glass, looked all around for window breakage, but everything in cabin was fine, in bow area I found a rock had came down thru bow portal, the only window not covered because it was horizontal and 8 feet above the ground. I always carry extra wheel bearings for the trailer, but have never had to use them.
    Frank
    Alaska Wildrose Charters and Cabins
    www.wildroselodge.com

  19. #19
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    Cool Towing Bra

    I also thought that the towing bra would be a good thing but I was told that if any dirt or any other abbrasive material got under the bra it would rub with the slight movements of the bra going down the road. I do not know this for a fact it is just what I have been told. I think those long mud flaps that mount to your bumper and hang to the ground would work really well though. I have experienced broken windows from flying gravel, so whenever possiable cover the windows.

  20. #20
    Member Arctic Hunter's Avatar
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    Default Glass Boat with a extended motor transom

    My pilothouse glass boat is going to have an extended motor transom carrying a Yami 150 FS. Should I worry more about this, the frost heaves are starting to get me worried.

    AH

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