Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Repairing MAJOR Pelt Damage??

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Remote Interior
    Posts
    30

    Question Repairing MAJOR Pelt Damage??

    I've seen numerous threads about getting an animal with a much bigger caliber round than planned, or a smaller round that did much more damage than planned. How do you repair MAJOR pelt damage when an animal causes massive damage attempting to free itself from a leg hold trap, or when a bullet path results in a much larger than anticipated entry / exit wound?

    PM's welcome!

  2. #2
    Member tjmeyer1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    97

    Default

    Any holes, both small and large, I sew up. I use "Spider Wire" fishing line, which is very strong. Here is a lynx I sewed a couple of years ago that someone shot with a hunting rifle. To assure the stitches survive the tanning process (the majority of the time), I lock each stitch.



    Pass it on, take a child hunting, fishing or trapping.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eagle River,AK
    Posts
    1,494

    Default

    Nice job Ted! I was recently told by my tax guy though that he waits till the hide comes back from tanning to sew it up. Wonder why.. seems backwards to me. Anyhow, I have a cat from this year that was hit by a .223 that needs some attention. Sewing class??

  4. #4
    Member tjmeyer1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    97

    Default

    Steve,

    Is the cat already on the board?

    If it is a thicker skinned animal like a wolf or a wolverine, leaving a hole until after the tanning process isn't a big deal. If you leave a big hole on the thinner skinned animals, you run the risk of it tearing more. I've seen it happen to friends who didn't take the time to sew up a hole. A two inch hole can turn into a ten inch hole real quick.
    Pass it on, take a child hunting, fishing or trapping.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eagle River,AK
    Posts
    1,494

    Default

    Makes sense. My cat is skinned, but rolled up in the freezer because I wasn't sure if I had it sold yet. I skinned it last week so it's still fresh. Let me know your next skinning schedual and I'll stop by for a sewing lesson..

  6. #6
    Member tjmeyer1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    97

    Default

    Steve,

    I'll be doing a bunch of skinning next week, so I'll give you a call. We have hockey every night for the rest of this week. I'm heading up to the line on Sunday night and I'll be back on Tuesday.

    Ted
    Pass it on, take a child hunting, fishing or trapping.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    FAI
    Posts
    2,294

    Default

    I've seen worse stitches on guys stitched up by professionals! That looks like some pretty nice work. I've only done a little bit of thread and needle work myself, using a big sewing needle and dental floss. Seemed to work ok. I had one hole that after the skin dried it tore right next to the repair. All the rest seemed to hold ok.
    Labman did some sewing on his lynx this year. Seemed to do a pretty nice job. He bent some needles which I guess could be avoided if a guy used a leather needle? Maybe when I get rich and famous I'll buy one.
    Nice set of photos showing how it can be done. Thanks,
    ARR

  8. #8
    Member aktomboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Delta Junction, Alaska
    Posts
    104

    Default

    Vet supply places, feed stores or a Vet can get you a curved needles, I get them from my vet after they are past the point of being used to sew an animal, $1 a needle cant be beat to me

  9. #9
    Member lab man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    551

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ak River Rat View Post
    Labman did some sewing on his lynx this year. Seemed to do a pretty nice job. He bent some needles which I guess could be avoided if a guy used a leather needle? Maybe when I get rich and famous I'll buy one.
    Nice set of photos showing how it can be done. Thanks,
    ARR
    There was quite a hole in that lynx. Guess that's what happens when you blow up a shoulder... The ears were actually the hardest part to sew. I ended up with a few nicks from turning the ears, and the thin skin up there makes sewing almost impossible. I actually used some glue that was made to be used for leather repair. Seemed to work alright, but don't nick the ears!!!

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Remote Interior
    Posts
    30

    Default

    Well... it's a bit ironic that I posted this yesterday... it was originally in reference to a lynx my partner happened upon while cross country skiing and he shot her at VERY close range (10 feet) with a .22-250. There are two large holes (grapefruit size) on either side of her neck, with only a couple inch strip of intact skin between them... going to be an interesting repair attempt for sure.

    Today's check of the line adds a WHOLE new level of WHATTHA????? to the mix. I FINALLY snared my first coyote this morning... (the one my partner was looking for with the rifle) woohoo!... only to walk up and realize HE'S MISSING A FRONT LEG??? There is a GAPING hole, about 5" across and easily 8-9" long where said leg belongs. Now I'm really bewildered... how do you repair a missing limb???? Do I just attempt to close the hole and have a very oddly shaped 3-legged pelt, or chalk it up as a lost cause and add it to the "we'll be keeping this one" pile and use the rest of the hide that's salvageable?

    The strangest part of the whole evolution is there's no sign of the missing leg anywhere, no blood trail, no nothing to indicate where the leg went or was lost... all other traps on the line are untouched; and to be missing THAT high up... it is literally torn off at the shoulder joint..... I swear I was looking around in the willows for the hidden camera. <GRIN>


  11. #11
    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Gnome, Ak
    Posts
    787

    Default

    I'd say the other coyotes got to it. Pretty common. It isn't like the leg "just fell off".
    Know guns. Know peace. Know safety.

    No guns: no peace. No safety!

  12. #12
    Member bushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Now residing in Fairbanks from the bush
    Posts
    4,363

    Default

    Have to agree that is fine sewing repairs by Ted! Good tip on locking all the stitches too so it all doesn't come out during the tanning process.

    Togasmom, that's gonna have to be in the keeper pile I'm afraid, no sense trying to sew up something where the actual hide is missing over so large an area. But it looks like you have most of the back and the good parts to make something out of, I'd just tan it up and use it. Congrats, neat pics too, thanks. Gotta say I've never seen anything just pull a shoulder off like that and not eat other parts. Freaky.

    FYI, I'm using suture thread pakets to sew closed tears. You can get them in all variety of threads and needles, curved, straight, and different type threads and thread sizes, dacron, monofilament. Thread is already attached, been using the long straight needle with heavier black mono, think it comes with 3' of thread attached. Also carry a variety in my first aid kit.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •