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Thread: Super lines

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    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    Default Super lines

    Super line dilemma.
    The diameter of the high-end braded line is so small you need 3 times as much to fill a reel. 50lb test Power Pro is the equivalent size of 12lb test mono, its nuts. I bought 350 yards to fill a new real and I barely made a dent so I went back to using braided Dacron at a fraction of the cost, and I can tie a knot without cutting my hand.

    For deep sea fishing and trolling I just donít see the advantage of using the Super Lines unless you load them over cheap line so you can fill your reel, and the stuff will cut you bad if youíre not careful.

    What I will be doing is loading my altar light casting reels with 15lb test Power Pro that is the size of 4lb test mono; I see this as a real advantage especially when you hook into something larger than you barged for.
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    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    The only drawback to the dacron is the drag in the current, because of its large diameter. I agree its tons easier to tie

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    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    Good point, I didn't consider the drag factor; for trolling it wouldn't make any difference.
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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    I really like the no stretch factor of the spectra lines, too. It sure helps with hook sets and increases sensitivity as well. Spool up some dacron backing as filler and top off with the braid of your choice.
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    Member Mel Roe's Avatar
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    another benefit of the braided lines is abrasion resistance If you are fishing for rockfish or ling cod. But you are right it will cut you if you aren't paying attention.
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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    You can load up your reel with dacron as backing and put a 100 yd top shot of spectra over top of the backing to reduce costs.
    Use a back to back uni knot to connect the two lines together.

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Roe View Post
    another benefit of the braided lines is abrasion resistance If you are fishing for rockfish or ling cod. But you are right it will cut you if you aren't paying attention.
    Actually the super lines are not as abraision resistant as dacron, mono or flourocarbon.
    When we are trolling big flatfish on bottom for lakers we run 4 to 6 feet of mono or flourocarbon as a leader.
    If we don't eventually the braid will fail and we have to wait for the lure to pop to the surface to retrieve it.

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    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRIFTER_016 View Post
    You can load up your reel with dacron as backing and put a 100 yd top shot of spectra over top of the backing to reduce costs.
    Use a back to back uni knot to connect the two lines together.
    This is what I did, just pulled it off the new reel and loaded it over another one half full..filled it up.
    So now I have one upright bottom jigger with 85lb dacron and one with 50lb Power Pro, will see how they compare this season...not far away now.
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    Member AKluvr95's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRIFTER_016 View Post
    You can load up your reel with dacron as backing and put a 100 yd top shot of spectra over top of the backing to reduce costs.
    Use a back to back uni knot to connect the two lines together.
    I was doing math this weekend to figure out how much PowerPro [100# equiv 20#] to outfit my 4 new halibut rigs.
    Based on the info provided on Cabela's 2X 490 yards [40#] for our 2 each 345 Penns and 2X 330 yards [30#] for our 2 each 330 Penns equated to a 1500 yard spools and 2 each 500 yard spools for a whoppin' total of $277.98. Jeesch!

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    The only way to spool spectra line on a large capacity reel is with backing. Maybe put 150-200 yds of spectra on top of dacron backing. You need to backing regardless because a lot of the time spectra will just slip on the spool. The reel repair guy says he gets a lot of "broken" halibut reels that don't have a dacron backing and the spool is just spinning inside of the line.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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    I buy the cheapest mono i can find and use that as backiing. The cheaper the better! I then top off with braid. I bought a 1500yrd spool of 80lb for 110.00 and i can do 5 reels with that. You cant wear out braid. Every once in a while just cut off the last 10ft or so if it looks tattered and you are back in business. you can also wind the line from one reel to another thus putting the fresh unused line on top. It will last for years. Also it takes a lot less weight to hold bottom halibut fishing with it. WHat a difference that makes. You can get years out of braid. I know guys who are fishing charters with line that is 5yrs old and its still as good as new. In the long run its much cheaper than mono or dacron

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    Member captaindd's Avatar
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    I normally buy Power Pro off ebay last spool 3000 yards 150 pounds was $230. I found that using the heaver line I lost fewer sinkers and other gear. Getting it snag, and hook damage number 1 reason for line breaks.

  13. #13

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    Question - Why does it have to be full?

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    You want your reel to be as full as possible to maximize reel efficiency. The smaller diameter your spool the less line that is retrieved per crank of the reel. Full reels mean less work.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Also with a full spool, you're drag will be smoother.

    If you're using a reel that was designed around mono and dacron, then using a backing is the way to go. I've found for 3/0 and 4/0 reels a backing of about 50yds does the trick to fill up the spool for 200-300 yds of braid. The other key with braid is you have to load it and your backing onto the reel under tension. If you don't load it on the reel under tension, it will dig in and lock up the reel.

    I can't imagine not using braid with bottom fishing rigs. The sensitivity is amazing, I can literally tell the type of bottom I'm fishing by the feeling transmitted back through the line. You can feel your jig plunk into silt, hit rock, or even brush against coral even in several hundred feet of water. It would impossible to jig in 300+ feet with mono as it simply stretches too much, and even dacron is too stretchy for extended depths.

    For trolling or mooching, I have two rods w/ 30# braid and two w/ 20# mono. I haven't fished them enough to have formed a thorough evaluation, but I'd have to say the braid seems to work better in that application as well due to the better sensitivity. It's also nice when you're waiting for the next school of silvers to swap your mooching rig for jig, and drop the bottom to see what you'll find.

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    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    Wish I would have started this thread a couple of months ago before buying line, itís been way informative. Iíll be peeling off some Dacron and topping off with Power Pro or some other super line.
    Jay
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    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    I am pretty fond of the Tuf-Line XP. I usually (actually Alfonzo with B&J's) put a 100-150 yards of backing (dacron) then put on 200 yards of Tuf-line XP. Less drag, and I keep the same line for 3-4 years without changing it. When I detect a fray, I cut and retie. My newest real an AVET HX 5/2 I had multi-colored Tuf-line that changes color every 10 feet so you can count colors so you know how deep you are. A cheap line counter so to speak. I love it and will replace all my reels with this line as I need to change line. Nothing better than to fish with lighter weights and less drag than using the dacron lines. http://tuf-line.com/products_TUF-Lines_5.html This stuff reminds me of the colored leaded line I use to use as a kid for trolling lake trout. Counting your colors and boat speed would estimate your trolling depth. Ahhhhh, the good old days of using a knotted cord with a weight to find your bottom depth, and dropping a thermometer in the water to find the right temperature depth to troll at before the fishfinder was available or affordable.

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    Good info here, just REMEMBER: super braid is so limp, it tends to loop around the rod tip with the slightest slack especially if you are jigging...make sure that rookies on your boat are especially aware of this so they don't get your good rods broken!! The improved super braids like PowerPro and Tuffline XP have built in more stiffness to help avoid this problem, thy are worth using. Also, the original Tuffline, if you can find it, had a thread of dacron woven into it to avoid this very problem...too bad they had to "new and improve" it

    Many other superbraids besides PowerPro are using this "extra body" technology now, and there are some newest ones that incorporate Gore Tex for even better performance, especially in casting, or so they say, I'm staying with my line til I wear it out which will be awhile.

    And, even more importantly, it's been mentioned already that these extra thin, very strong lines can cut you: make sure everyone is aware that you do NOT get the line around your finger when removing a loop from the top of the rod, or the reel handle and do not even hold the line in front of the reel to "feel" a bite, you don't need that with these sensitive, no stretch lines. Basically keep your hands from the line, it can cut to the bone in seconds with a small fish and take a finger or hand off too with a halibut!

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cap'n Ron View Post
    Good info here, just REMEMBER: super braid is so limp, it tends to loop around the rod tip with the slightest slack especially if you are jigging...make sure that rookies on your boat are especially aware of this so they don't get your good rods broken!! The improved super braids like PowerPro and Tuffline XP have built in more stiffness to help avoid this problem,...
    That's why I use PowerPro. It has extra stiffness that helps with that rod tip line wrap. But I still check it every time I put my line down.

    And the "cutting" thing is a very important thing, too. I had one client grab the PowerPRo to try and help subdue a 60 lb. halibut and when the butt decided to head back to the bottom it put a surgeon's slice in one of his fingers from one side to the other. He survived and even kept fishing after wrapping it in antibiotic ointment and gauze. He was a trooper.

    But I've had plenty of nice slices as the PowerPro sliced across my finger as the fish made a sudden unexpected run. You do need to be very careful with it.
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    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muttley Crew Fishing View Post
    That's why I use PowerPro. It has extra stiffness that helps with that rod tip line wrap. But I still check it every time I put my line down.

    And the "cutting" thing is a very important thing, too. I had one client grab the PowerPRo to try and help subdue a 60 lb. halibut and when the butt decided to head back to the bottom it put a surgeon's slice in one of his fingers from one side to the other. He survived and even kept fishing after wrapping it in antibiotic ointment and gauze. He was a trooper.

    But I've had plenty of nice slices as the PowerPro sliced across my finger as the fish made a sudden unexpected run. You do need to be very careful with it.
    what pound test would you recommend, and where do I get some, does the gear shed (redden) carry it?

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