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Thread: External frame packs, lower shelf, barneys

  1. #1
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    Default External frame packs, lower shelf, barneys

    Okay, I own a Barneys external pack. I've had a couple hunting seasons with it. It has a couple sheep hunts under it's belt and it's got me thinking.

    The pack with load tends to be top heavy, mainly dealing with grade and rough country. The rear bar is at about a 45 degree angle, it would seem like the pack and weight could drop 6 inches or so if the bar was at a 90.

    Just wondering on the why of the design, packed moose quarters, sheep, and really loads well, just it's ability with a heavy pack going up or down serious grade I tend to be a bit off balance, which I don't want to be.

    Seems if I lower the weight, I can lower my center of balance. Which would put the weight at my belt line

    I figure I'll go in and talk to the Barneys crew, but just wanted to figure out why the packs, really all externals, ride high?? Internals on the lower hand have a much lower load starting point. Really making me think about them for sheep this year,

    So why riding so high on the externals? Anyone modify their pack to ride lower? And how did it work out?

  2. #2
    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    The shelf should set at 90deg. Your setup doesn't sound right.

    Get rid of the shelf and move your pack down. (or secure sleeping bag/other gear below bag) I haven't had a shelf on mine (or sissy bar) for about 10 years.

    Of course, you really should go in and have Bob or one of his experts fix you up right.

  3. #3

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    I think he is reffering to the shelf "bar" (for lack of better term) is set at a 45 degree angle while the shelf itself is at 90 degrees to the packframe. I didn't like having the meat shelf on my pack. Extra weight and can accomplish the same thing with paracord or strap webbing which is what I use on mine cause its faster and easier to get it tighter secured to the pack than paracord. Lashing the meat lower on the pack than the shelf will lower where the majority of the weight is. Just an option to look at.

  4. #4
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    I have a pinnacle and don't use the shelf. One of the things I have noticed is that when I put a load of meat in the bottom of the bag the pack belt tends to slide down my waist more than when the weight is loaded a bit higher. Of course the center of gravity is higher but it is noticeably more comfortable to carry if the terrain permits. I'd like to rig up some sort of light weight nylon shelf inside the main compartment for this purpose, especially when I don't have other camp gear in the pack to help redistribute a meat load.

  5. #5
    Member mekaniks's Avatar
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    I have a Barney's pack with a shelf also. I generally like the load up higher on my back, but if I am going to be going down hill and want to lower the load/center of gravity I can just adjust my shoulder straps and it lowers the entire load as far as I need. But yea, I think you should probebly go talk to Bob or one of his dudes..

  6. #6
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    Ya, talking about the lower shelf. I'm liking the idea of removing it to sheep hunt and lowering the pack. Then I can play with loading it with some weight and see how it feels. I'll go talk to bob as well, see if they have any advise.

  7. #7
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    THE CURRENT DESIGN IS CORRECT

    The human body is designed to stand erect only without an external load. Once you strap on a pack, your body wants to tip forward from the hips up in order to center the load over the hips. That pack shelf on an external frame, being above the waist belt of the pack, keeps the weight above the hips, which is where it belongs with the upper part of your body tipped slightly forward.

    A frame with the shelf at the belt line places too much burden on the lower back and is extremely difficult to manage. It actually pulls your shoulders backward which is the opposite of putting the weight above your hips. This puts center of gravity behind your hips. ALL WRONG.

    To experience this just load up a heavy pack and stand at position of attention. You'll want to tip over backward and your lower back will strain to keep you from doing so.

    Additionally, a pack with the shelf at the bottom makes coming downhill in steep terrain difficult as the lower part of the pack wants to drag the ground when you "scoot" downhill.

    This is sorta difficult to explain in words without pictures, but I hope this helps. You WANT the majority of the weight at the center of your back, not lower or higher.

    Taylor

  8. #8
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I always use a tumpline to move weight around while walking
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    I always use a tumpline to move weight around while walking
    I made one but never liked it much. May not have had it hook right to the pack.
    Joe

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