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Thread: your Emergency pack, Whats in it?

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    Default your Emergency pack, Whats in it?

    Hello All,
    I am trying to put together an emergency pack for my snowmachine. I live in Fairbanks so I am thinking fire starting supplies, shovel, tow rope, etc. I realize that your pack is suited to the terrain you ride in. I donít think an avalanche probe would be something I would want to carry all the time, because I donít ride in the mountains for example. So here is the question. What do you carry in you emergency pack?
    Alaskan100

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskan100 View Post
    Hello All,
    I am trying to put together an emergency pack for my snowmachine. I live in Fairbanks so I am thinking fire starting supplies, shovel, tow rope, etc. I realize that your pack is suited to the terrain you ride in. I donít think an avalanche probe would be something I would want to carry all the time, because I donít ride in the mountains for example. So here is the question. What do you carry in you emergency pack?
    Alaskan100
    Don't forget naked pictures of your significant other. No dip in over-flow, a river, a lake, or a collar bone-breaking tumble will stop you from getting back home.

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    1/2 a bottle of whiskey is what most Alaskans carry for survival gear.

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    This is a common thread topic, you might search for "survival kit" etc on here and you'll find other threads where you'll see lots of responses, but this is always a good topic IMO and a good reminder for people.

    I think a good kit should allow you to survive an overnight bivy if you have to, and I pack accordingly. My list sounds extensive but what I carry fits in my pockets, in my backpack (a small daypack) and in the tunnel bag on my sled.

    In my pockets:
    -McMurdo Personal Locator Beacon
    -Chapstick
    -Cough drops
    -Spare hat
    -Bandana
    -head lamp
    -matches
    -lighter
    -Leatherman multi-tool
    -Howler Whistle
    -GPS

    In my pack:
    -Spare clothes, in a dry sack- Balaclava, thermal pants, socks, thermal top, mittens
    -Shovel
    -Probe
    -Very basic first aid kit
    -Zip ties
    -Gerber Machete Jr w/ sawback
    -Small survival kit that includes:
    ----Lighter
    ----Matches
    ----Plastic sheet
    ----Emergency blanket
    ----Tin foil
    ----Water filter (straw type)
    ----Signal mirror
    ----Button compass
    ----Small flashlight (keychain type, LED)
    ----Paracord
    ----Wire
    ----Small knife sharpener
    ----12 hr candle

    In my tunnel bag:
    -Map
    -Road flare (for signaling or fire starting)
    -Chemical hand warmers
    -Can of sterno, small stainless cup
    -Emergency bivy sack
    -Roll of duct tape
    -Rope or tow strap
    -Small tool assortment
    -Large knife
    -Chemical glow sticks
    -Small battery powered lantern
    -Beef jerky, candy bar, possibly a sandwich
    -Minimum 1.5 liters of water, tea or gatorade
    -Toilet paper
    -Spare gloves

    I probably forgot something but you get the idea. My gear focuses on staying warm and dry, signaling, getting out of a stuck or doing basic repairs, and being able to hunker down for a night if necessary.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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    A sat phone. An Esbit stove. A Blast match. A knife. Two flashlights. A cheap space blanket. Knowledge of how to get by with less.

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    Carry a waterproof means of starting a fire on your person like in a coat pocket, as well as a backup fire starter set in the daypack...just in case you get separated from your pack. A cell phone in a waterproof container, mini-drybag or ziplock on your person.

    Other than that I always carry a sleeping bag in the daypack. Most other stuff is nice to have, but not mandatory to stay alive for awhile. But that usually includes food and and a flashlight.

    Tow ropes, etc. are kept in the snowmachine kit in the trunk.

    If its really cold out I add clothes to the backpack.

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    Member KelvinG's Avatar
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    Snowshoes, I was browsing replies and didn't see them mentioned.

    When you are out in the middle of nowhere, pretend you machine broke down and try walking back a 1/8 mile or so. You'll soon realize that without snowshoes your only option is to camp out with your machine until somebody finds you.

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    My best and most important survival tool is a good riding partner. I forgot that earlier.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    My best and most important survival tool is a good riding partner. I forgot that earlier.
    Preferrably one that isn't prone to saying "I know a short cut to get back."

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    TOOLS!!!

    The most common problem you run into while snowmachining is breaking something. You should have a good tool kit with screwdrivers, pliers, vise-grips, cresents, socket set matched to your machine, electrical tape, duct tape & bailing wire (really!) and some spare parts like spark plugs, drive belt, headlight bulb, and a few nuts & bolts of key sizes (e.g. rear suspension mounting bolts).
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    I go a little overboard. But what Do I care? its being hauled by a machine

    Fire starting stuff including tinder
    Knives, Folding saw
    Flashlights, batteries
    Esbit stove and fuel.
    Titanium cup
    Jerky, freeze dried food
    100' of 550 cord
    handwarmers, first aid kit
    Extra socks, hat and gloves
    tarp
    chemlights
    compass, gps
    duct tape
    and a bunch of other stuff. Just dig around the house for awhile and see what you come up with. I got everything packed in a 3 day assault pack.

    If Im in a situation out there my plan is to dig in and wait for the rescue. So warmth/shelter, hydration and food is my priority in that order

    Ill add also to practice winter fire building, especially in crappy weather as that will probably be when you need to make a fire in an emergency situation. Its harder than you think.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NRick View Post
    Preferrably one that isn't prone to saying "I know a short cut to get back."
    That kind of partner is usually the reason for survival gear! Everybody has the potential to be that guy.

  13. #13

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    When it comes to carrying firestarter ... I say don't fool around. I carry a propane bottle with a click start nozzle. I carry it under my seat. If you have to start a fire out in the snow, usually everything around is damp or wet. That doesn't matter if you have a propane torch. Just point, click and blast the wood until it dries out and ignites. I do carry matches as a backup. Limitation: Propane torches don't work well when temps head way south of zero.

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    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dinglishna View Post
    When it comes to carrying firestarter ... I say don't fool around. I carry a propane bottle with a click start nozzle. I carry it under my seat. If you have to start a fire out in the snow, usually everything around is damp or wet. That doesn't matter if you have a propane torch. Just point, click and blast the wood until it dries out and ignites. I do carry matches as a backup. Limitation: Propane torches don't work well when temps head way south of zero.
    That's one way to do it! My last-ditch firestarter is a road flare. Sort of the same idea.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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    wow...pretty much rimfirematt's bag is what i have in mine. Sometimes i take a big sub zero sleeping bag and always a 10 x 12 tarp...when i dont have the arctic oven. Just in case you get to spend an unplanned camping outing.

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    tool kit with common wrenches, hex set, couple torx wrenchs, small vice grip pliers, small crecent wrench, stainless steel safety wire, zip ties, rag, screwdrivers, plug wrench

    rope, headlamp, compass, leatherman, waterproof matches wrapped in a few ziploc bags(doesn't do any good if match striker gets soaked and falls apart), insulated space blanket vacuum packed, gps, extra batteries, cell phone, food and candy, water, zip ties, gorilla tape, plugs, sterno, spare goggles, extra gloves, balaclava, extra hat, shovel plus saw in handle, probe, beacon, maps and gps coordinates, and always a spare belt on the sled, everything is all scattered between my pack, my pockets and my handlebar bag

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    Good information just add good sense and knowledge or all the equipment is useless. Make your kit and learn how to use it.

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    Dont forget meds. e.g. asthma inhaler, heart meds, diabetis ect... Had a freind almost die a couple of weeks ago when his machine broke down and he started walking in cold air and his asthma started acting up and his inhaler was at home. Fortunatly someone picked him up on the trail and he ended up ok. But I bet he dosent go out again without an inhaler in every pocket...

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    Well I did see spare batteries mentioned a time or two. Keep that telephone, beacon, and other emergency electronics stuff, inside of your jacket to keep those batteries warm as they won't put out much power if frozen... Question somebody mentioned 1/2 bottle of burbon...why half bottle ;-) ?
    And how about leaving a "flight plan" with someone, of a good idea or where you plan to travel, just in case they have to search for you and your 1/2 bottle of burbon.
    I saw a cartoon years ago of several eskimos with their dog sleds and a guy goes by on a snowmobile and the guys look at each other and one says, just wait until he breaks down and gets stranded out there and tries to eat that thing.:-)

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    I read every post in this thread and not a single individual posted a firearm. Always. Always. When I walk out the door of the house, always, have a sidearm.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

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