Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Brewing beer

  1. #1

    Default Brewing beer

    Looking to start brewing my beer. Have a 10 gallon and a 30 gallon stainless pressure tank. How long will beer last when you use co2 to keep pressure on the tank? Any advice on brewing a good amber or clear beer. The root cellar will be home for the "Keg" constant 38 degree.

  2. #2
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,133

    Default

    Beer will last a couple of months in the keg.

    Not sure what you mean by a clear beer? The best advice I can give is Sanitize! About the only way to really make a beer unpalatable is to have it contaminated by some rogue bacteria.

    Beer making is pretty simple. Just follow the directions somewhat close, and keep everything clean. The next biggest thing to worry about is getting your yeast off to a great start. Add them in there when the temperature is just right and follow the directions on the bag really well. I like the liquid wyeast stuff that kind of cooks in its own bag.

    If your in anchorage hook up with arctic brewing supply. they will set you down the road with good advice. And they have great recipes too. The bushrat amber is pretty good.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    110

    Default Yeah what's a clear beer???

    Man I wish I had a root cellar with a constant temp like that. How did you manage that? Anyways if you are needing anyone to sample your home brew let me know. My services in the beer tasting department are always free and honest.
    “There's a humorous side to every situation. The challenge is to find it.”
    George Carlin

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    951

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pa18tony View Post
    How long will beer last when you use co2 to keep pressure on the tank?.
    Much longer than it will when it is hooked to a tap and me and my friends have pint glasses in our hands!

    But really, several months easy. If you started off with something good it would last much longer than that, say 6 months, at 38F. I'm just guessing though. Never had a keg of homebrew last anywhere near that long.

    Arctic Brewing supply in Anchorage is who you need to talk to.

  5. #5

    Default

    I have brewed some years ago and made several different recipes. By meaning clear i wanted to brew a beer as close as you can to a bud/miller. I do like darker beer but my wife started taking a liking to my bud so i need a beer that resembles that.

  6. #6
    Member moose-head's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    @ Seminary, Dubuque Ia
    Posts
    839

    Default

    I think that cornelieus kegs are the way to go for kegging. There is an initial investment, but they are kind of the standard for home brewing. Lager beers are ‘clear’ types, and they work at cooler temperatures for fermenting (although I think that it is still above 38 degrees) but they are finicky and harder to work with. Ale yeast is a little hardier and works at a warmer temperature and you should be able to find something that you like. Somebody suggested http://www.arcticbrewingsupply.com/ and supporting a local business is my first choice. There are others online that you can use as well (Midwest supply, northern brewer etc.). You can also find a ton of videos on youtube for brewing and kegging beer.
    If you board the wrong train, it is no use running along the corridor in the other direction.
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer

  7. #7
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    By meaning clear i wanted to brew a beer as close as you can to a bud/miller.
    You are looking for a good Pilsner then I happen to like a Pilsner now and then when I'm looking for something lighter to drink. My favorites are Coldfoot Pilsner (brewed in Fairbanks) and Sam Adams Nobel Pils. Budweiser and Miller are actually "american lagers" but I like Pilsners better in a lighter beer.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    951

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pa18tony View Post
    I have brewed some years ago and made several different recipes. By meaning clear i wanted to brew a beer as close as you can to a bud/miller. I do like darker beer but my wife started taking a liking to my bud so i need a beer that resembles that.
    Honey. Substitute a portion of the barley malt with honey - say 3-5 lbs light or extra light barley malt and 1-2 lbs honey per 5 gallon batch of homebrew. Go easy on the hops, maybe 1 to 1.5 ounces of something like Cascade. My friend who rarely drinks anything but Bud will drink a brew like this. Nice part is that it is much better than Bud, so the rest of my friends will drink it too.

  9. #9

    Default

    When we were expierimenting years ago we made a honey/ raspberry cranbeery mead. That turned out good but you had to use a mixer. Little to much alcohol. The keg that i have looks like a cornelieus keg on steroids, 30 gallons. i do have the 10 gallon one but i hate to use it we set it on the wood stove and pressure it up to shower.

  10. #10

    Default

    If you want a light beer along the lines of Bud or Coors but don't want to mess with lager yeast and lagering temps, try a Cream Ale. Skookumchuck has an award winning recipe for a cream ale if you're an all grain brewer.

  11. #11

    Default

    If you are just going to use your root cellar to store your finished beer it won't really matter if you use a lager or ale style yeast. However, if you want to try fermenting a lager-beer you need to search for a lager yeast that works well at cold temperatures.

    As long as you keep your keg pressurized with CO2 you should be able to store it for months on end. Also, using a good quantity of hops will help with shelf life. I've stored some bottled brews 5-7 years and they are still great. If you can stand to wait, the beer usually gets better with 3 or 4 months aging. It will also help with clarity if that is your goal. Many of the inexpensive domestic beers don't use a lot of hops and I feel that contributes to a much shorter shelf life.

    If you want to brew a light colored beer like Bud or Miller you may consider substituting some of the malted barley with other adjuncts such as rice or corn. That is what the big American breweries have done successfully. I've found that if you stick to using the lightest colored malted barley or barley-extract you can buy, you will end up with nice lightly colored beer, but, never quite as pale as Bud or Coors.

    One last thing you can try to get your beer clearer is to add a pinch of Irish Moss while boiling the wort. It helps settle the proteins.

  12. #12

    Default

    Here's a recipe that'll get you close to the color of Bud but with much much more taste. My all grain cream ale recipe that uses barley, corn and rice:


    Type: All Grain
    Date: 2/11/2010Batch Size: 5.00 gal
    Brewer: Jeff ShearerBoil Size: 6.02 galAsst Brewer: Boil Time: 90 min Equipment: My Equipment Taste Rating(out of 50): 35.0 Brewhouse Efficiency: 75.00Taste Notes:
    Ingredients
    AmountItemType% or IBU5.50 lbPale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM)Grain70.97 %1.50 lbCorn, Flaked (1.3 SRM)Grain19.35 %0.75 lbRice, Flaked (1.0 SRM)Grain9.68 %0.50 ozWilliamette [5.50 %] (60 min)Hops10.9 IBU0.50 ozHallertauer [4.80 %] (60 min)Hops9.5 IBU1 PkgsSafale US-05 (DCL Yeast)Yeast-Ale
    Beer Profile
    Est Original Gravity: 1.042 SG
    Measured Original Gravity: 1.043 SGEst Final Gravity: 1.012 SGMeasured Final Gravity: 1.010 SGEstimated Alcohol by Vol: 3.86 % Actual Alcohol by Vol: 4.29 %Bitterness: 20.3 IBUCalories: 189 cal/pintEst Color: 3.0 SRMColor: Color
    Mash Profile
    Mash Name: Single Infusion, Light Body, Batch SpargeTotal Grain Weight: 7.75 lbSparge Water: 4.53 galGrain Temperature: 72.0 FSparge Temperature: 168.0 FTunTemperature: 72.0 FAdjust Temp for Equipment: FALSEMash PH: 5.4 PH
    Single Infusion, Light Body, Batch SpargeStep TimeNameDescriptionStep Temp90 minMash InAdd 9.69 qt of water at 163.7 F152.0 F
    Mash Notes: Simple single infusion mash for use with most modern well modified grains (about 95% of the time).

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •