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Thread: What size boat ?

  1. #1
    Member Roger's Avatar
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    Default What size boat ?

    Been reading old post but will bring it up again ,What size boat for PWS ? I'd like to get a 22,24 or 26 ft Looked around a bunch last year to get a feel for what I want but still not sure going to have to be no more then 20,000 want to have a boat with no payments, Found a few last year but they sold quick. What the smallest boat anyone has taken out deer hunting out of Whittier ? If I could afford a"GREAT" boat I would but I'm tired of bank payments and the wife said 20,000 max. If you have that size boat post a photo I like to get ideas, I want a boat with room in the back for relaxing and fishing for 2-3 people and has a cabin.

    Thanks in advance
    PEOPLE SAY I HAVE A.D.D I DON'T UNDERSTA.....OH LOOK A MOOSE !!!

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    Member NewMoon's Avatar
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    There's a C-Dory 22 for sale in Lynden WA for $19,500. Don't know anything about it.

    http://seattle.craigslist.org/see/boa/2194149204.html
    Richard Cook
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    I was looking on Craigslist the other day and saw this boat. Was really tempting. It might fit your needs and price range. I'm trying to resist temptation and not call.
    http://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/2185365563.html

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    There are some good deals out there you just have to be ready to buy it when it shows up. There have been some C-Dory on CL as of late a bit older models but closer to you PR. Boat size is always the question, most of the time itís not getting out to the areas that is hard it's the getting back part that falls apart with weather and then you have to hold up in a cove for a couple days and on a smaller boat with 2 or 3 people it gets a bit short sided.
    There again in sure ing the boats is reliable is pretty important.
    Myself i like a 24' to 26' in a boat that gets me where i want to be out in the salt water, another drawback on smaller boats is fuel and how far can you run. Just a couple things to think about
    Good luck

    Sweepint
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  5. #5
    Member Roger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tealer View Post
    I was looking on Craigslist the other day and saw this boat. Was really tempting. It might fit your needs and price range. I'm trying to resist temptation and not call.
    http://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/2185365563.html
    Thanks I did not even see that one
    PEOPLE SAY I HAVE A.D.D I DON'T UNDERSTA.....OH LOOK A MOOSE !!!

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    For $15k you'd actually have money left to fish.
    One big consideration is size for pulling down the road. I've seen some nice 28 footers but when you get any bigger than 26 or so width gets to be a problem and you need the oversize permit stuff. 24-26 seems to be reasonable to pull yet big enough to move around in when your fishing or handling water when it gets a little rougher. My buddy has a 21' boat but when you have more than one or two people actively fishing on the back it gets crowded quick when you have to net/gaff etc. I picked my 26' boat for the large fish deck and still have adequate cabin to get in out of the weather. Nothing crazier than someone bringing a good fish to one side and everyone likes to see and that rail gets nuts. I've always worried about having enough room for everyone to move, cast, gaff, net, etc for three people and sometimes more. Always a consideration. Not just boat size but fishing deck size.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    How many people will you have on board, and how long of trips do you want to go on, both duration and distance from port?

    For fishing, a 22' cabin cruiser is fine for 4 people, for overnighters its really a 2-3 person boat.

    When you throw dear hunting in the mix, you are going to need a boat that can handle signifigantly larger water than in the summer time, and have something you can comfortably hunker down in. Also consider what islands you plan on hunting. If you want to hunt montague, I'd have a hard time considering anything under 28' unless you're only going to hunt in August.

    No such thing as too much boat, until you pay for it and hit the fuel docks

    Friends scored a 26' Hews a few years back for $20k, but they ended up putting some money in the trailer and internal stuff. With the way the economy is, I'd say look in Washington state, lots of folks buy boats down there and either have them barged up, or tow them up.

    In the price range you're looking at, you'll need to budget some $ for upgrades. Before you know it, new tires for the trailer, new wiring for the trailer, decent sonar, safety equipment etc can add up to $3-5k.

  8. #8
    Member Roger's Avatar
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    Thanks for the input ,I know about upgrades I have owned and still own airboats. Having a regular boat would be easier on the wallet LOL!!!!
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  9. #9

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    I hate to say it, but you're not going to get much boat for $20,000 or less that after a month or so you're going to end up having to sink more money into. Anyone that owns a boat knows that even a new boat is a "money pit" and to get a decent 22 to 26 ft. boat you're going to have to be pretty lucky. I'm sure there are a few out there, but when I was buying the boat I have now I tried to limit it to about $20,000 or so and I think I looked at over a dozen boats that looked as though there were issues on all of them that would mean having to sink another few thousand into them to get them running properly, or that within a season they'd develop some sort of serious problem.

    What I found with looking on Craigslist is that a boat looks great in pictures and in print, but then you go and look at it closely and consider the things that you can't see (what does the inside of that engine or outdrive really look like?). If it's aluminum are their any hairline cracks in the welding? If it's fiberglass is it going to need a whole new gel coat? Does that steering system that feels pretty good on land when you try it out have about 10 hours left on it before it needs to be replaced?

    Your power plant is going to be one of your major stumbling blocks. A decent 24ft. boat new is going to be at least $40,000 or so, so figure it out from there. You're not going to find anything that is anywhere near new and the older a boat gets the more "little things" are going to pop up that just nickel and dime you to death.

    Make sure you know what the major and little things are that could turn that $20,000 "dream boat" into an extra $5000 (or more) a few months later. I had to sink $18,000 into new outboards this summer when the two "like new" outboards I had on it decided to blow their oil pumps and blow every single gasket in my upper unit. The only way I could have known that was going to happen was if I'd taken the boat to a dealer, had them tear the engines apart and look at everything. Kind of an expensive proposition when you're just considering purchasing a boat.

    I'm not saying you might not get lucky, but...
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
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  10. #10

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    I agree that used boats can be a nightmare. I'm a big fan of "new" when it comes to power, but I can live with a used hull, as long as it was built by a reputable builder. With the motor, unless you personally watch the previous owner run those engines, you are taking a big risk as to how those motors were taken care of. If you do buy used, ask for where the maintenance was done. Ask for records. If the owner kept all his maintenance records, the he probably took care of the engines. Go talk to the mechanics and ask them if the boat was in every 100hrs for service.

  11. #11
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Mutt's made some excellent points. When looking at a used boat, you should factor in the cost of re-powering. I.e., if you had to repower, would the boat be worth what you're paying plus the re-power cost. Often times bumping your budget up a bit will get you a boat in much better condition that won't need major re-work, and will be less expensive than the cheaper initial price boat that needs a bucketload of money pumped into it. Generally folks sell boats for two reasons, one they are getting out of boating due to moving or they can't afford it anymore, or the boat needs major work and isn't worth putting the money into it, so they unload it.

    But as far as a decent new 24' boat being $40k, I think the reality for a cabin cruiser at that length is you are looking closer to $80k.

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Roger,
    We picked up a nice 22'er in Oct a few years back in the price range you are considering.
    It can be done if you have time and patience. Maybe we got lucky, but she has been trouble free for 5 years now.
    Granted we looked at alot of boats, had cash on hand, and it was October. The owner was motivated and the time of year probably had something to do with it.
    I've seen plenty of Bayliner 2452 Classics w/Alaskan bulkheads for sale and a bunch of older trophy's that would meet your requirements.
    BK

  13. #13

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    Bigger is usually better. I have never met any one who said their fuel tank is to big and almost every salt water boater I know wishes they had more fuel capacity. I lean towards a minimum of 8' 6" beams and 22' minimum length. A boat should never be over loaded.

  14. #14

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    Roger,

    Look at how much you are willing to spend for a day of fishing on fuel, and work backwards from that. Figure $5 gas. If you would have no problem spending $200-300 for a recreational fishing trip, then get a big boat. If that sounds ridiculous to you, then start looking at lighter aluminum boats with 4 Stoke power.

    I like to fish a ton, so I obviously needed to get a boat that I could make long runs in, and still keep my fuel bill somewhat reasonable. I settled on a very well built 20' aluminum boat. It doesn't have all the comforts of a bigger boat, but it's just as safe, and I go fishing in the sames spots 2x as much as the guys with the bigger boats, and still have the same fuel bill. But like I said, I love to fish..

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    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    In that price range I would look hard at a 24 Bayliner. They are by far the best value for the buck. There are a lot of people that would never own a Bayliner, mainly due to their terrible reputation in the 80's. I have a friend with a 24', and I have been out on it several times, and it does fine. It has an inboard gas motor, which is cheap to maintain or replace of needed, and it seems to perform well for it's size. His only complaint is that it is pretty heavy to trailer much, so he just leaves it in the lot in Whittier for the summer for $450. I think his is closer to 30K, but it is a really nice one, so I am betting you could find one for 20K no problem.
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  16. #16
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    Roger,

    Look at how much you are willing to spend for a day of fishing on fuel, and work backwards from that. Figure $5 gas. If you would have no problem spending $200-300 for a recreational fishing trip, then get a big boat. If that sounds ridiculous to you, then start looking at lighter aluminum boats with 4 Stoke power.

    I like to fish a ton, so I obviously needed to get a boat that I could make long runs in, and still keep my fuel bill somewhat reasonable. I settled on a very well built 20' aluminum boat. It doesn't have all the comforts of a bigger boat, but it's just as safe, and I go fishing in the sames spots 2x as much as the guys with the bigger boats, and still have the same fuel bill. But like I said, I love to fish..
    Calvin,

    In south central the opperating costs are higher. I'm not sure exactly where the op is located, but for me to run from Anchorage to Whittier or Seward ends up being $200 for day w/ $3.50/gal gas. And that's for a relatively small boat running a 140 horse burning 6gph at cruise, 9gph when friends are chipping in on fuel. When you add in fuel for your tow rig, tunnel fee in the case of whittier, launch fee, and parking, you're out about $100 before you've even started your o/b. Then you start burning gas in the boat, and you can easily cover 100 miles in a day trip to get to good fishing spots.

    Guys running bigger boats are opperating more in the $300-500/day range in expenses. Opperating costs definately need to be calculated in when looking at boats in a given size range, as some boats are real gas hogs for their size. Paying another $5k for a more fuel efficient boat can pay off in just a couple years if you're using it frequently.

  17. #17
    Member captaindd's Avatar
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    My 33ft Coldwater was burning $560 aday 2010.

  18. #18

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    Dang.. Glad I live where I live. I do this run on 12 gallons of gas, and that includes 5 or 6 hours of trolling with the main motor. We go often. (like 3 to 5 days a week during the peak of the season, early mornings and evenings too if we get a chance)


  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Mutt's made some excellent points. When looking at a used boat, you should factor in the cost of re-powering. I.e., if you had to repower, would the boat be worth what you're paying plus the re-power cost. Often times bumping your budget up a bit will get you a boat in much better condition that won't need major re-work, and will be less expensive than the cheaper initial price boat that needs a bucketload of money pumped into it. Generally folks sell boats for two reasons, one they are getting out of boating due to moving or they can't afford it anymore, or the boat needs major work and isn't worth putting the money into it, so they unload it.

    But as far as a decent new 24' boat being $40k, I think the reality for a cabin cruiser at that length is you are looking closer to $80k.
    He just said he wanted a boat "with a cabin" so I was thinking a 24ft. Hewescraft. It's been a while since I've priced them, but I think you can get a pretty much "no frills" one for about 40K. And it will fish 2-3 people easily.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
    http://muttleycrewfishing.com

  20. #20
    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    Dang.. Glad I live where I live. I do this run on 12 gallons of gas, and that includes 5 or 6 hours of trolling with the main motor. We go often. (like 3 to 5 days a week during the peak of the season, early mornings and evenings too if we get a chance)

    I'm about ready to buy you and your boat a ferry ticket for the Homer derby. cause you've got it goin on!

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