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Thread: Kingfisher 2425

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    Default Kingfisher 2425

    Got a couple questions. I told my little brother he should just get his own profile and ask his own question.
    Ok He is think about buying a kingfisher 2425 with twin 90 horse. So what everyone thought or what would you look into getting. Has to be aluminiuim. Up too about 130 thousand. No hewes craft. thank Mike
    Do I give my friends advice? Jesus, no. They wouldn't take advice from me. Nobody should take advice from me. I haven't got a clue about anything..

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    Member ken210's Avatar
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    Mike is he looking for used or new? For 130K he could get a kingfisher 2725 which is a lot more boat or the Duckworth offshore. I've seen a used 2825 kingfisher on craigslist for 105k. I've been looking at new boats and I am really impressed with the Duckworth offshore. If your bother wants to get a boat with twins make sure a single motor can get him on step if not its just gonna be a giant kicker motor.

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    Don't have much experience with Kingfisher boats, so don't have much of a comment there, but I do have occasion to drive several different boats at work with twins. IMHO, if he's looking at a 2425 he should consider twin 115's. They are fairly economical to operate, but "should" be able to get the 2425 on step with a single engine if necessary. I don't know if I'd have the confidence a single 90 could get that boat on step if it's fairly well loaded.

    Looking at his budget, but not knowing what he intends to use the boat for (short day trips close to port, multi-day hunting/fishing trips, etc...) he might also consider stepping up a bit in size to avoid getting "two-foot-itis" after he's been out in the new boat several times. Have him consider how much deck room he wants. A 24' pilothouse will likely have a pretty small deck which will get crowded pretty fast if he's hauling crab/shrimp pots, coolers, fishing gear, camping gear, etc... along with a couple of buddies!

    My biggest suggestion would be to look at as many boats (hands-on) as he can to get an idea of what features he likes and/or does not like.

    Have fun shopping!

    Chris

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    Quote Originally Posted by ken210 View Post
    make sure a single motor can get him on step if not its just gonna be a giant kicker motor.
    Quote Originally Posted by double tap View Post
    I don't know if I'd have the confidence a single 90 could get that boat on step if it's fairly well loaded.
    I know I'll get crushed for this, but I just don't see this making much of a difference, if any. I realize a lot of you do, and I've read it here before, but I guess I just don't see it as a deal breaker in any way. Tell me why I'm wrong (other than it will take me "x" hours to get back to somewhere).

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    Mike,
    A budget of 130K is huge in my opinion for a mass produced cuddy. Someone can correct me if I'm wrong but that would have bought the 29ft Wooly Pilot house with twin 150hp Yamaha's at the boat show last winter. I think they wanted 125K, maybe 129K. I'm pretty sure it was in his ballpark. A 29ft pilot house is alot more boat than what you talking about. Tell your brother to get his ducks in order and think about what he is doing. 130K will buy just about any mass produced 26ft cuddy boat and even possibly some semi-custom/custom boats. Maybe contact Bayweld in Homer and see what they can offer for that price. They make a heck of a boat.

    Sorry if this is a bit blunt but I wish I could afford a 130K boat. That 29ft wooly was fully decked out and a sweet rig. Self bailing deck, tons of fishing deck space, huge cuddy, electric fridge, head, tons of galley space with cook top, dinette, twin 150hp Yamaha's and a great builder. Anyway, just dreaming about spending your bro's money. But your bro's options are pretty wide open with a budget like that. Keep us informed about what he does. Seeing all these new boats is a great source of entertainment during the long winters up here.

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    Homertime,

    Naw... No crushing here! I've been on a boat when one of our outboards seized, leaving us with one. The single got us on step, and with the winds forecast to blow up that afternoon, we made it the 50 or so miles back to town while the seas were still relatively flat. If we had not gotten on step, our options would have been more limited, and if we'd tried for town and gotten caught by the storm front we'd have had precious few places to duck out of the weather. So I do believe there can be a safety aspect to larger outboards...

    With that said, you are also right in that with either a kicker, or a second outboard that won't get the boat on step, it's usually just a longer (time wise) ride back home. No big deal most of the time. But, with a budget of 130k, and a difference in cost between the 90 and the 115 of roughly $1,500 per engine, what's the downside of going with the larger outboards? Heck, if it were me with that kind of budget I'd be looking at a 26-28' hull with, at a minimun, twin 150's, but that's just me...

    Chris

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    I too think he should step up to a bigger boat. The only time a boat is too big is when it is behind your boat on the trailer (or if you go so big that it can't get on the trailer and it is stuck in the harbor for the winter). Not only do you have more room for your stuff, but give everything else is the same, the bigger boat will handle rougher conditions safer and better. I would look at going bigger, and not getting all of the bells and whistles at the start and add things later. This is especially the case if you are considering new, since you take such a big hit on resale these days. I think your best bet is to watch the used markets and be ready to strike. That way someone else puts all of the gadgets on the boat and you get them for free.

    I woudl look hard at the Washington used market, then you have an excuse to do the inside passage this spring.
    2009 Seawolf 31'
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    Patrick,
    At the boat show the 29 wooldridge was running 155k...
    Homertime like double tap was saying no crushing here. The twins thing is a long drawn out debate that's been had for a long time. My theory is if you can't get your boat on step with a single motor you're better off saving yourself some money and going with a big single and a kicker. It boils down to getting home in 8 hours depending on winds and seas or 4 hours with a motor that can push your boat around on step.

    Ken

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    Quote Originally Posted by ken210 View Post
    Patrick,
    At the boat show the 29 wooldridge was running 155k...
    Homertime like double tap was saying no crushing here. The twins thing is a long drawn out debate that's been had for a long time. My theory is if you can't get your boat on step with a single motor you're better off saving yourself some money and going with a big single and a kicker. It boils down to getting home in 8 hours depending on winds and seas or 4 hours with a motor that can push your boat around on step.

    Ken
    Thanks for correcting me on that. I got to thinking about that last night and realized it was probably 150K. I bet I was dreaming it was 125K just so it was closer to be a realistic purchase in my future. Still, 130K will buy alot more boat than a 2425 Kingfisher with twin 90s. I know he said no Hewes but I got my barely used 26 Pacific Cruiser with twin 150s and fully outfitted with well under a $100K. The boat only had 70hrs on it when I got it. How much more boat can you get for $130K. Quit a bit I'd bet.

    But anyway, thanks for setting the record straight on that....ohh and making me get real about how far away I am from getting that boat.

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    Sorry Patrick! I think the 26 Woolie was about the price you're thinking. I feel your pain I've been looking for a 28-30 footer for a while and the prices are a little shocking... But like momma said spend the money now because it's the last boat I'll own for a while

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
    This is especially the case if you are considering new, since you take such a big hit on resale these days. I think your best bet is to watch the used markets and be ready to strike. That way someone else puts all of the gadgets on the boat and you get them for free.
    That is exactly what I am doing right now.... 2007 model boat with 100 hours and discounted $50-60K from new, plus I get all the extra stuff added after it was purchased.

    I know for a fact that there was a used 30ft Kingfisher sold last fall by AKMD for $140.... it was fully loaded with twin 250's, even had a bow thruster... There are several ads for 2825's on craigslist right now for $105-120 that come with everything you need, shrimp pots, pot puller, dingys, radar... rods and reels.. everything. There is no way I would buy a new one. Tell him to search craigslist, Alaska Boat brokers, nautical north and some of the national websites. There are deals out there to be had.

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    Just another thought:

    The Kingfisher 2425 does not have a self bailing deck. That is a huge issue for me.

    Last year I looked at them all. I finally decided on a four year old Kingfisher 2525 that I bought from AM&D. And as far as jumping on the right boat, I made the three hour drive to Anchorage and walked in as soon as they opened the first day it was available.

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    Sounds like the financial side isn't the issue. Just have your brother sit down and write out what he wants in his boat......i.e. what's he plan on doing with it, and therefore, what features are important. My wife and I wrote down all the features we could think about, and then we prioritized them. We both had some things that were a must-have, and then we went from there. Ended up getting a cuddy cabin 26 foot boat that is good at doing everything we want, but it's not the best at doing any one thing. Hope that makes sense, but this was how we figured a boat would make us happy without wishing we'd gotten a different boat. And, it was a good process. In the end, I bought a Kingfisher 2525 used. Fish deck is almost 8' long, self bailing deck, big fish holds (that double for gear too), cuddy is nice but not huge, and the cabin is comfortable with enough storage. Power plant is a 250 Etec with a new kicker that I bought to replace the POS that was on it. Like others said, I don't think I'd recommend anything smaller from what little you've explained so far.

    It might take a while of looking, and don't rush. Took me probably 4 months or more before the right combination came along and my timing was right for the deal. Don't get bummed when he misses a deal either. I missed a few, but it definitely worked out.

    Good luck!

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    Thanks everyone for the post but I was just informed that 90 grand is the budget. So what the best bang for you buck then. Thanks alot everyone.
    Do I give my friends advice? Jesus, no. They wouldn't take advice from me. Nobody should take advice from me. I haven't got a clue about anything..

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    A used Kingfisher 2525 is still well within your budget. Time to go window shopping and enjoy looking at different boats.

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    Quote Originally Posted by akmike30 View Post
    Thanks everyone for the post but I was just informed that 90 grand is the budget. So what the best bang for you buck then. Thanks alot everyone.
    While that changes things quite a bit 90K is still a nice range to be in. Lots of nice boats. Admittedly I have a Hewes but I was curious why no Hewescraft? I certainly understand there are better boats out there but I was just curious. You can get a fully loaded 26 Pacific Cruiser with twin 150s for under that price. I did. I've also seen Boulton and I think a 26ft Wooly with twin 115 Etecs last spring for that price range.

    As someone mentioned above, if you line out the specs he wants that might help. Aluminum, cuddy, head, size, etc.

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    I know of a 2005 Kingfisher 2525 available in Anchor Point that is not advertised that can be purchased for $75,000.
    Shoot me a pm if you want the contact info.

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    $130 is a whale of a lot of money. There was a 28' volvo D4-driven North River 28 on AK boat brokers for a long time, sitting unsold in SE for $95k or so. That one sold recently. This past winter there was a 28' almar sounder diesel in Fairbanks for $75k. That one had me thinking...

    Don't want to pop any balloons, but the North River Seahawk, Almar sounder, GC, Seawolf, or myriad other semi-custom and custom plate aluminum boats are a lot more boat than the offshore offerings from riverboat makers (Hewes, Kingfisher/harbercraft/jetcraft, weldcraft, alumaweld, Koffler, boulton, etc.) from the standpoints of hull design and detailing. Kingfisher has a bolted ss handrail on a painted, welded aluminum boat. Let that sink in for a bit. Hewes has stainless rear tow eyes bolted through their now-bubbling vinyl graphic sticker and a plywood deck bolted to the structure below. The plywood feature is shared by weldcraft and boulton. Hewes has no lifting strakes and a minimal, extruded chine, making it dig pretty hard while on step.

    I own a Hewes 26 because a good deal on one came up and I still had to scratch like crazy to get into it. $130k would open a lot of other doors...

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    Everything Vek and others say about Hewes compared to some of the top-of-the-line boats is true, including the price. You get what you pay for, and I am very happy with what I got for what I paid for a 26' Hewes AK, medium length cabin, twin Honda 135's, enclosed marine head, sink, heater/stove, washdown system, 600' of rode w/anchor/...don't know what lifting strakes are, but if mine ever needed lifting they can put a nylon strap under it...never thought about the stainless bolts in the back, but they aren't showing any corrosion yet where they contact the aluminum...Tricker trailer with 6 ply tires...no decal pucker after 3 years on the water!

    Anyway, this boat listed for $92K in Pasco WA, it was a 2007 model but brand new everything when I bought it in 2008, and I paid just under $70K...a lot of boat for the money, and I couldn't get under $89K in Alaska and we enjoyed the tow up, easy road IMO...well, most of the way till we hit the frost heaves after Beaver Creek heading into AK from the Yukon. So, I got a new HC boat for a used price! And, the ones in AK and most will come with twin 115 Yamahas...not quite enough if you are loaded to get on step with one motor, but my Honda 135's do get on step with one motor and a heavy load and are very efficient, about 8gph cruising 24-26 mph. You can get the 150's, but that extra power only kicks in at 4500 rpm, and I rarely want to cruise that fast...would be handy in an emergency though as you have more top-end, I top out about 38-40 mph , and the twin 150's with the right prob can probably do close to 50mph in a 26' HC.

    So, if you are now in the $90K range, it's a new HC, or one of those other fine boats in used condition, which is fine depending on how the motors etc. are....you don't want to be buying new motors; lots of those used ones will have shrimp pots, a puller etc. that you just about get free..Another thing about HC: they have a big door in front and a open bow well. That is something we HAD to have because we beach and unload a lot of stuff, and those other more expencive boats don't have that kind of front access. There is some controversy about whether the HC will take water over the bow and sink because of small scupper holes and that front well, but mine has very adequate scuppers (maybe they are made bigger now), the front door and well-hatches seal well, I just don't see that as a problem. I rarely go out in anything over 3-4 feet and don't plan to. If I get caught, no problem, it's just a matter of driving the boat well. I've been in 8 footers and big swells in a 22' cuddy boat, and we were fine, but not something I would routinely do. The one verified incident of a sinking HC was an older boat, underpowered, with about 10 or so people in 10' seas and someone that didn't know how to drive it. If you want to read about this, which I really don't think is a valid problem but a few others do, search the forums, it's been a thread a couple of times.

    So, features, as some have mentioned, can be as important as other factors, and the HC had the best front door and access system we had to have, along with the reasonable price.
    Last edited by Cap'n Ron; 02-04-2011 at 11:20. Reason: typos

  20. #20

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    Lifting strakes are different from spray rails in that, besides deflecting water and spray from the hull, they also provide dynamic lift--they physically help lift the hull higher out of the water.

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