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Thread: Recommendations for a plow around Anchorage.

  1. #1
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    Default Recommendations for a plow around Anchorage.

    I'm going to be in Anchorage next weekend and I'd like to pick up a plow set up for my 2009 550 grizz. Any suggestions on where to buy?, and any recommendations on what type of setup? It will be my first wheeler plow set up. Anything would be great, Thanks!


  2. #2

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    Buy "V" Bar Chains also.

  3. #3
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    Place a call to Anchorage Yamaha and see if they are offering any deals. They make bulk purchases of Warn plows and usually can make a good deal. I paid like $300 for a complete plow set up for my 550. It's only a 48" plow with a standard midframe mount but the price was right. I hear the new Warn Provantage system is really cool (Front mount that only takes seconds to attach/remove). A larger blade can also be cool for large driveways, but also a hinderance for fitting in tight places and storage. Trailercraft is the Warn distributer in Anchorage so make sure and check them out also.

  4. #4
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    I actually got ahold of a guy at Anchorage Yamaha. I did some research on grizzly central forums and decided i was going to go with the warn pro advantage system plow. I got a mount, tube, 54" plow for 499$. Just need to get it down to Kenai now!


  5. #5
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    One of the biggest challenges when using an ATV plow is dealing with side-spillage, especially on areas where you need to do parallel passes (which includes just about anything except for cutting a narrow, single blade-width trail through the snow).

    Let's use a driveway as an example. On your first pass, you'll push some show ahead of the blade, but then some additional snow will spill off one (if the blade is angled to one side) or both (if the blade is more or less perpendicular to the direction of travel) sides. So, by the time you are done, your driveway has less snow on it than when you started, but it also has a corduroy-like pattern of parallel snow berms, from where the snow spilled off. If you do a second pass, hitting these ridges, you'll just end up with a second set of smaller ridges when you are done.

    This is a really long way to say that you may very well want to put shields on the end of the blades, to help prevent snow from spilling off the sides. Or use a snowblower to remove snow, and the plow just to break up hard pack or loose ice.

  6. #6
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    Angle the blade and keep the windrow all to one side.

  7. #7
    Member junkak's Avatar
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    Added the " side shields" to my atv moose plow . What a difference.
    Also added a 5" flap of heavy duty rubber over the top that pushed any overflow back in front of the plow.

    Makes clean-up easy and quick.

  8. #8
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    Are these "side shields" one size fits all or specific to your brand of plow. I have a 72" Polaris Glacier Plow on my 2010 Ranger 6X6 and the side spilling is a pain in the dugger. I just make multiple passes and clean it up but especially when I cross my muni street to the other side I leave a line or two of snow and I know a side shield would clean that up reall nice. If they are aftermarket and can be mounted relatively easily that might be something I'd look into. Taking it in to be welded etc is not worth it and I'll just keep making passes.

  9. #9
    Member junkak's Avatar
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    Ordered mine from a Moose plow dealer. They came ready to mount after i popped a couple holes into the plow for the bolts. Took a drill bit and about 15 minutes.

  10. #10
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    I have an 09 grizzly 700 I just bought this year. I also got a Warn Pro plow that mounts to the front of the frame & winch. The wheeler is good but the plow retracting system sucks. I do like the mounting points. They are easy to get at and friendly to mount & dismount the plow. The retracting process to lift the blade is poorly designed. The cable from the winch runs thru a composite plastic piece on the base of the plow. This piece has brokeh two timne already this year. Where it is secured to the base of the plow is again poorly designed. I have had to welkd a couple of gussetts on there and installed a small pulley in place of the plastic part. This has caused the cable to break 3 times already this winter. I think that I have modified it enought to last for a while, but this has been a very low snow year so far.

  11. #11
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    akpolaris, have you tried a shorter piece of synthetic (spectra) cable for you plow? It seems to handle making the sharp bend down to the plow better than steel cable. I use a 10 ft section on my winch in the winter for plowing that way I don't wear out the longer, more expensive piece of spectra I use in the summer. If you switch, make sure there are no burrs on the fairleads, it cuts the line.

  12. #12
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    Default First

    First find a dead car or truck, they're all over the place i.e. Jim Creek or along the Parks in Houston. Preferably one that ain't been burnt or that looks like it was stored in Beruit. Get the longest seat belt outta it. Cut the buckle off without damaging the factory sewn loop. Now take your metal or synthetic cable off the winch. Then put a couple of yards of cheap 3/8" poly on, as backer, on the winch enuf for 2-3 layers of poly about the winch drum. Ending the poly so that it spools to the center of the drum as viewed from left to right. Then with one of those $1.99 dockside-convince-store fishing knives and your propane torch cut/melt five 3/4" long slots longitudinally in the seat belt strap, 1" apart starting about 1" from the end you're gonna feed onto the winch. Lace the poly thru the seat belt, no need for knots, friction will hold it in place, if your seat belt remnant is long enuf to wrap about the drum 4-5 times. Get a small shackle and attach that to the un-cut factory loop on the business end of the seat belt. Attach to plow. No more high $$$ wire rope, synthetic cable failures due to the sharp bend over the fair-lead.

    After breaking the first cable end to plow connection I learned the gizzie is cheesy by design. It's sacrificial to save the plow arms and undercarriage of the wheeler from damage due to failure to take your finger off the IN button and bustin sumthin off your ride.
    Natural Selection begins with you!

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