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Thread: Reloading Log Book

  1. #1
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    Default Reloading Log Book

    So when I learned to reload years ago I was taught to to keep a log of each reloading session. I kept track of powder, (type & weight), bullet, primer and qty loaded.

    I didn't load, or shoot much, for several years, and am now starting to get back into it. I'm starting to realize there is way more data that is worth keeping track of but I'm not sure how much I want to try and track (I have a tendancy to go over board with data some times).

    So my question is, what kind of information do you track when reloading?
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  2. #2

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    I'm into the basics of components, OAL, gun it was loaded for and date. I'll go back and add hunting notes with the same load. Recovered bullets from game go into labeled film canisters and reference back to the load, but I've always intended to photograph them and put those right on the page with the loading data. Someday. I also keep track of the # of times cases have been fired, and when they get trimmed or discarded.

    One thing I have done for almost 50 years when testing loads is cut out the groups and tape those onto the data page.

    Of everything I've recorded, the hunting notes and taped-in groups have proved the most useful. As a rifle ages with lots of shots down the bore, the groups are especially handy for monitoring trends in group size.

  3. #3
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    that is a great idea to keep the groups. I was thinking about just recording that, but clipping the targets would be more interesting to look at later than a simple number.
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  4. #4

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    It has turned into a really need set of "records." When I'm testing loads through a range of powder charges, having each group arrayed on the page and labelled really shows oyu what's going on. Groups fired every thousand rounds or so with the best load show the ame kind of progression over time. Just a glimpse at all those clipped-out groups speaks volumes.

  5. #5

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    I made a Excel spread sheet with Primer,brass, Gr & type of powder, velocity, group size, notes on weather

    I go to the range then come home and measure group size and enter it. Invaluable in testing, & troubleshooting.

  6. #6
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Along with the written data for my loads, I take photos of all my groups and have found that data to be most helpful. I print out copies and attach it to my log.



    Steve
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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Geez, Stid, Now There's some shootin' goin' on there,

    I also like looking at the targets, I put all the info on there similar to the photo above,
    even figure and write in, the avg velocity and variance, measured group size, etc.
    then I keep the targets in Chronological order,
    also have a logbook that has all that info written, results for every grain and group,

    I have many times looked at those targets, even after looking at the data in the logbook and "seen more(?)"
    there's something about seeing the results actually on the target.
    More info to the eyes to see a .52" group, than to read about one, or something

    So, how do you print them Steve, to be able to enter them in the logbook, or do you have a Really Big Logbook?
    I suppose the photo comes out small, (what size?)

    I've been thinking of cutting out the most attractive groups (group/grain that I'll be interested in) from that test target and stapling them into the log or something...??
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  8. #8

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    In my case I just cut out the groups, label them, and tape them directly to the page, sometimes as many as a dozen to a single page. If I switch to photographing I'd do the same, just crop the target picture to show only the group, label it, and compose a bunch to a single page I could put in the log right with each log entry.

  9. #9
    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kk alaska View Post
    I made a Excel spread sheet with Primer,brass, Gr & type of powder, velocity, group size, notes on weather

    I go to the range then come home and measure group size and enter it. Invaluable in testing, & troubleshooting.
    I did the same thing... keeping my paper based notes organized was problematic, and not neat or tidy at all... I eventually bagged it, and started recording everything on an Excel spread sheet. that way I can sort it by any variable and pull up only the stuff I am interested in at that particular moment. Say for example, that I only want to look at loads for my Winchester BB 94 in 375 W with cast bullets. I can then select that rifle (since I have more than one in that chambering) and that bullet, and get only the information I need.

    If anybody wants a copy of my spread sheet, just let me know. you could easily customize it to your own liking.
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

  10. #10

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    I find that I go back to my logbook quite often. I find it a very valuable tool in my loading. Usually, I only record: date, cartridge, primer, bullet, powder and charge, COL, velocity and group size. I keep the best grouping target with a particular load inside the 3 ring binder I use for a logbook.

  11. #11
    Member Armymark's Avatar
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    I track my data by first rifle then bullet. All other components to that combo are variable. So for example, My Ruger No. 1 in 7MM Remington Mag has numerous sets of load data per bullet. For each specific rifle there may be several bullets and I'll work a combination of components for each bullet to meet a specific application. With another 7MM Remington Mag rifle, I'll have another section in my data book with numerous bullets and the data that goes with each specific to that rifle. So my data book is sectioned by rifle, then by bullet with numerous variations of components. I'll also keep data that was not good so I don't try it again later because I forgot I already did it.

  12. #12
    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    Here is a pdf of what my spread sheet looks like filtered for 375 Winchester loads
    Attached Files Attached Files
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

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