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Thread: Cabela's tent cot

  1. #1
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    Default Cabela's tent cot

    Has anyone used the cot tent (http://www.cabelas.com/dome-backpack...tent-cot.shtml) in below zero temps?

    They look like a great idea for solo hunting and fishing in a canoe or ATV but it seems the wind blowing under the cot would freeze your behind in a heart beat even with the closed cell pad on the bottom. My back is cold just thinking about it. My thought is if you staked a tarp on the up wind side and pulled over the top of the tent part it might stop the wind and allow the thing to be useful in cold weather.

    Anyone have any experience with these?

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    Never slept in a tent cot. Therefore it is safe to conclude I have also never slept in a tent cot in below zero temps. I have slept in cots many times before in a wide range of temps as well as tents.

    Last time I slept in a cot I swore to myself it would never happen again. I dunno I find them very uncomfortable. I can't even really roll over or sleep on my side in those things. I would rather sleep in a plain 'ol tent or on the ground any day over a cot.

    I have seen the tent cot things though (my friend brought one camping) and they are pretty bulky. Seems to me a tent and a nice sleeping pad would pack smaller and give you a better nights rest.
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    Cots are COLD SLEEPING up here, even in Summertime. That said, I know people who like them-but their tents have stoves.
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    Gotta agree with the comments. When I lived up there I slept on the ground too, but that was 20 years ago and a lot of abuse to my back and some other issues so the cot allows me to sleep a fair amount better. I use a Big Agnes 2 person and a ultra light cot now for solo trips hunting, fishing or dirt bike trips.

    We're moving to Idaho panhandle next year and I'm looking for cold weather gear since there is no shortage of cold air out there. Something that is easy to set up and warm but can be moved easily every day if I want. I'm planning to trade in my Polaris 700 for a 6x6 and use that out West so bulk is not so much of a problem. My wife is a summer camper lately so I thought the little cot tent thing might be a viable option but it seems it would be awful cold on the back. I read a ton of reviews on their web site and almost all were very favorable. I actually got the idea off the BWCA canoe site and it gets pretty cold in Canada, MN and WI too....maybe not AK interior cold, but pretty chilly.

    Thanks for the comments and hopefully someone will have used one of these contraption and can comment on how they stay warm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by .338-06 View Post
    Cots are COLD SLEEPING up here, even in Summertime. That said, I know people who like them-but their tents have stoves.
    Umm....you know what's colder than sleeping on a cot? Sleeping on the ground. The ground will take away more body heat than the cot will, which is one of the reasons cots are used (not to mention comfort).

    A cot will be warmer to sleep on (with a thin mattress), than the ground, and I think that set up would work well.
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    Checkout the ultralight cot http://www.luxurylite.com/cotindex.html. I just purchased this cot & I have plans to use it this spring during my solo black bear hunt with an ultra light tent & sleeping bag (combined weight for tent, bag & cot is around 15lbs). Sleeping on a cot makes a huge difference to me, plus I will have room in my tent for gear. The Cabela's tent cot looks like it has positive reviews, but I'm not sure that is the setup you want for winter camping.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Live2HuntAK View Post
    Checkout the ultralight cot http://www.luxurylite.com/cotindex.html. I just purchased this cot & I have plans to use it this spring during my solo black bear hunt with an ultra light tent & sleeping bag (combined weight for tent, bag & cot is around 15lbs). Sleeping on a cot makes a huge difference to me, plus I will have room in my tent for gear. The Cabela's tent cot looks like it has positive reviews, but I'm not sure that is the setup you want for winter camping.
    That is the cot I am using now and it is wonderful, albiet a little hard to set up sometimes, especially when it is cold and the parts don't streach as well as it should. In below freezing weather I use a closed cell foam pad that cuts the heat loss down considerably and then I have a 2.5" self-inflating materess under my down bag. It is very comfortable and my only complaint is the cot is soo low that you can't sit on it to get your boots on or drink coffee in the morning before heading out but the Agnes is not high enough inside to sit too high anyway.

    I just went outside and it is 28 degrees and about a 25 knot wind so I don't think I want to be exposed in the bottom of the cot in this kind of weather. Maybe my current setup is just fine....at least with the fly on the tent the wind in outside and not blowing UNDER my cot.

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    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    When cold take a cot and cover it with a 6 foot long rug, then a Big Agnes insulated air mattress (http://www.bigagnes.com/Products/Det...irCoreRecycled) then two wool blankets on top of the air mattress. Finally a Wiggys bag. Cots are cold and when the alternative is laying on ice the air in a tent is often much warmer than the floor of a tent.

    I've spent lots of summer nights on cots and usually just a bag or a thin poly-pad on the cot is very comfortable. If you were out in the wind with the cot you described you might need something more.

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    I have slept in one for week and found that condensation gets pretty bad in them. You have to leave one of the windows open or it rains inside. They are pretty bulky too so if you are trying to save space they are not the way to go. When they are packed down they still take up a lot of space and I don't think it would even fit on the average ATV rack. For that type of trip I would get a one man tent, a good pad and good Wiggy's bag.

    In regards to all the comments about sleeping on the ground or on a cot, the cot wins hands down. I spend about a month every year camping out. I could not imagine doing it without my cot. With that said there are some things to consider. A cot IS colder than sleeping on the ground. So to avoid freezing your tail, use your ground pad on your cot and you will be fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskan22 View Post
    Umm....you know what's colder than sleeping on a cot? Sleeping on the ground. The ground will take away more body heat than the cot will...
    Not necessarily. The season, composition of the ground and how wet it is will make all the difference here.

    Consider this... In the summer time, the sun heats the ground all day, every day. You show up and pitch your tent, roll out your pad & bag and go to bed. The ground is going to maintain it's heat content well into the night. The air is going to give up it's heat as soon as the sun sets. So, during the night, the ground is always going to be warmer than the air. That heat will slowly be sucked out of the Earth by the air moving around on top of it.

    When you sleep on a cot, you lose the benefit of being next to the stable temperature Earth. You now have freely circulating air under and over you. So as you give up your heat to the air, it is quickly whisked away in all directions. Back on the ground, you only had to worry about the topside.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Live2HuntAK View Post
    Checkout the ultralight cot http://www.luxurylite.com/cotindex.html. I just purchased this cot & I have plans to use it this spring during my solo black bear hunt with an ultra light tent & sleeping bag (combined weight for tent, bag & cot is around 15lbs). Sleeping on a cot makes a huge difference to me, plus I will have room in my tent for gear. The Cabela's tent cot looks like it has positive reviews, but I'm not sure that is the setup you want for winter camping.
    You will LOVE that cot man, feels like sleeping in a bed - no lumps, can sleep on your side or back easily. Just toss some stuff under the cot to keep cool draft away, and you're set!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Not necessarily. The season, composition of the ground and how wet it is will make all the difference here.

    Consider this... In the summer time, the sun heats the ground all day, every day. You show up and pitch your tent, roll out your pad & bag and go to bed. The ground is going to maintain it's heat content well into the night. The air is going to give up it's heat as soon as the sun sets. So, during the night, the ground is always going to be warmer than the air. That heat will slowly be sucked out of the Earth by the air moving around on top of it.

    When you sleep on a cot, you lose the benefit of being next to the stable temperature Earth. You now have freely circulating air under and over you. So as you give up your heat to the air, it is quickly whisked away in all directions. Back on the ground, you only had to worry about the topside.
    You hunt in the summer time?

    I agree with everything you said...which is why in reverse (for fall time) a cot is much better option.
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