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Thread: Guided hunters

  1. #1
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    Default Guided hunters

    I will be taking my 1st guided hunt this fall.
    What I'm looking for is stories of hunters that you would never take hunting again.
    As in to lazy ,scared ,rude,egos to big ect.
    What I am getting at is I do not want to be that hunter .
    I like to think we may all lean somethings from the nightmares you guys have had to put up with.

  2. #2
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Hemingway on talking about clients-

    Quote Originally Posted by headhunter353 View Post
    I will be taking my 1st guided hunt this fall.
    What I'm looking for is stories of hunters that you would never take hunting again.
    As in to lazy ,scared ,rude,egos to big ect.
    What I am getting at is I do not want to be that hunter .
    I like to think we may all lean somethings from the nightmares you guys have had to put up with.
    I understand your concern, but I wouldn't worry too much about it. You are who you are, and if you try to be someone you are not, that will be worse than if you were just yourself. The fact that you are thinking about it at all says something good about your character. You care. Someone who would ask this question is not likely to be the sort who would be a problem. Your guide knows you are new at this, and he should conduct the hunt at your pace, and ensure you have a good time. Just be yourself.

    I doubt you'll get many guides to tell stories about their "bad ones". Here's a quote from Hemingway that addresses some of that. Not all guides feel this way, but a lot of them do.

    Yes, we take a beating, said Macomber, still not looking at him. Im awfully sorry about that lion business. It doesnt have to go any further, does it? I mean no one will hear about it, will they?

    You mean will I tell it at the Mathaiga Club? Wilson looked at him now coldly. He had not expected this. So hes a bloody four-letter man as well as a bloody coward, he thought. I rather liked him until today. But how is one to know about an American?

    No, said Wilson. Im a professional hunter. We never talk about our clients. You can be quite easy on that. Its supposed to be bad form to ask us not to talk though.

    -quoted from "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber"

    I'm embarrassed to admit that I have let myself slip in this area at times; usually with someone I consider a friend. But in doing so I believe I eroded my character, and it's a thing I am not proud of. In fact, I wish I had not. It serves no purpose, really.

    Don't worry about it too much. Just enjoy your hunt.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  3. #3
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    Default

    First off trust your guide. Pitch in with any work detail. Offer to prepare dinner. Share the load. Listen to your guide. Example= I had a wyoming guide as a client on a sheep hunt. I spotted a bunch of Rams bedded. I told him relax, take a nap were not moving till they move out for dinner.
    I had the spotting scope going from one to the other. Now, that year I had already taken a Tok Ram for myself. Three of these Rams were beauts.
    Well, all of a sudden these sheep get up and are running. I figure a grizz must of spooked them. I call my hunters name and say, Wow, something sure got these guys attention. I turn to find the hunter gone. I stand up and your guessed it he's on a knoll waving his hankerchief. When I finally got him to come down he explained" I thought I'd try the old Antelope trick on them " Wave the white and they'll approach.
    Yes, I was mad but cautioned him that if a Ram was what he really wanted i would be directing the hunt.
    He listened from that point on and got a full curl + a 60" Moose.
    So, moral of the story DONT try to outsmart your guide. You may share your thoughts and he may go your way but ASK first.
    Good luck and have a safe hunt.

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    My advice is to just relax and go with the flow. The guys that are easy going and not concerned about who gets to shoot first, who kills the bigger animal, etc. always have more success.

    Also practice your shooting, guides love clients that can shoot, it makes their job a lot easier, and when your opportunity comes along, you can make the most of it. Follow your guides advice on the gear list, southeast Alaska is a unique environment that requires specialized gear. I would advise against substituting anything on the gear list without running it by the outfitter.

    Remember you are on vacation, relax and enjoy your experience, go with the flow, listen to your guide and the rest should take care of itself.

  5. #5

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    If you've already selected your guide, hopefully you and the guide are already well into discussions about expectations, what you want out of your guided hunt, etc.

    If you:
    - show up in decent shape ("decent shape" for sheep/goat hunts is very different than for moose/caribou hunts)
    - have practiced with your rifle and know your limits in terms of reasonable shot distances, how far you can accurately shoot from offhand, kneeling, sitting, and prone positions
    - have clothing and gear suitable for the potential weather conditions of your hunt
    - understand that weather factirs into almost every Alaska hunt
    - bring a positive attitude and a willingness to listen
    - understand that Alaska hunting includes lots of glassing and sitting on your rear end
    - practice muzzle discipline and safe hunting practices

    you should be well on your way to a great hunt and lifetime memories.

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    I was just fishing for some good stories.Like the one Roland told about the flagging [good one].
    I would think there would be hundreds of tails to educate and entertain us.
    I have hunted with many people in my years and most would not be invited again.
    Some were just there to get away not to hunt others just to party.Most just can't hang ,they are scared of the dark and everything else,they come with a boy scout sleeping bag that only covers up to their arm pits.

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    what mdhunter said ... if you don't know or understand as the outfitter - the more questions he has to answer the better and IF the outfitter doesn't "like" questions then find another outfitter - keep in mind that "getting in decent shape" is slightly subjective and does not mean walks after dinner or simply hours on a treadmill - you will need to use upper body strength a bit and stamina while carrying weight or dragging will almost always be involved - 1 or 2 sessions (min.) with a trainer will help a huge amount if you're not used to working out and don't start 30 days prior, make the start date AT LEAST 6 days ahead of the hunt - "think" it is easier to STAY in shape than to "GET" in shape

  8. #8

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    Be honest with yourself regarding your physical condition, and make sure your guide knows that well in advance of your hunt. If you aren't physically capable of the hunt you really need to be aware of that before you even book the hunt. If a particular guide isn't able to accommodate you, he may be able to steer you to someone who hunts an area that more suitable to your condition. As a guide I find the most frustrating thing for me is to find an trophy animal that my hunter isn't capable of getting to due to the hunter's physical condition.

  9. #9
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Putting it in a positive light...

    Maybe instead of telling stories about "bad" clients, telling stories about "good" ones might give you what you need?

    I like it when hunters share the workload. Especially the heavy lifting, like packing out their animal and such. It's also great when they assist at the kill site. This isn't Africa, after all, where we have three or four guys around to handle the skinning and meat issues. If you don't know how to do this stuff but want to try, just ask questions. If you can't do it, don't worry about it. Your guide is not expecting it. So find other ways to help; sharpen a knife, make a lunch, get him some water, whatever he needs.

    Learn all you can about the animal(s) your hunting BEFORE you come to Alaska. Read up on them, learn their habits, dig up the biological data. You'll appreciate the animal a lot more and it will add to your enjoyment of the hunt.

    Get in shape. Lots of hunters talk about this, but not many do it. But remember that even if you're in the best shape of your life, you probably won't be able to keep up with your guide. He makes his living traipsing around his area. The physical work you'll do in the field is completely different than the hiking you did at home. Just prepare yourself as much as you can, and do your best when you get here. The physical part of the hunt is really about 70% mental. If you tell yourself you can do it, you probably will. If you tell yourself you can't, you probably won't.

    Don't try to compete with your guide. Some hunters feel intimidated by an older guide, and some feel superior to a younger guide. Remember that the guide you booked your hunt with may not be the person accompanying you in the field. Make the best of what you get, and let him (or her) take the lead. Don't walk in front unless you are asked to do so. If you're not sure about something, ask. When it comes to the shooting part, don't take a shot that you are not comfortable with. And be sure to talk about this ahead of time. Let him know all of your limitations. That way he can conduct the hunt in a manner that fits you and your style.

    Accept his limitations. A guide can help you hunt the area, but he can't make animals show up, he can't control the weather, and he can't control the water level in the river. Sounds obvious sitting here in front of a computer. But when you're in the field and spending over $1,000 a day, it's frustrating to have to sit in camp during bad weather, or glassing a valley for the second day in a row without seeing anything.

    Develop realistic expectations. Alaska has the lowest density of game animals per square mile of any state in the country. There's a lot of acreage out there without a living critter on it for much of the year. So don't expect to see an animal behind every bush. Expect to do many hours of glassing for every animal you see. Be ready for bad weather (bring a couple of good books). Be prepared for flight delays; bad weather and mechanical problems can delay your flight to or from camp, so don't plan for any important meetings for at least three or four days after your hunt's scheduled completion.

    Don't give gear as a tip, unless the guide prefers that (ask). Most guides are pretty particular about their gear, and already have what they need. Giving cash allows them to use the money where it is most needed.

    Lots more to say on this, but this should give you some ideas.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  10. #10

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    Not really certain what or why you are asking. If you have booked your hunt these issues should have been discussed prior to the commitment both on your part and that of the guide. Each guiding operation has procedures they follow for a variety of reasons, levels of hunter participation vary considerably. If you "fuel up" the guide's plane without his permission - probably will not be "rewarded" with a big smile - same with trying to catch-up his mules or many other routine tasks around the camp or while hunting.
    Surprised at the high number of "poor" clients indicated in one of your posts. That certainly has not been my experience.
    Joe

  11. #11
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    Thanks for all the info.I will be in top shape for this hunt that I have been dreaming of for over 5 years .I can't draw a tag in montana but will have the points in about 5 years or so .I have stalked and drew my bow on a few good billies hunting high country elk.I carry spike camp on my back and hunt out of it.
    I am sorry if I crossed the line by asking for stories of clients or hunting buddies that were bad.
    How about some funny or good thinks about them that stand out in your mind.

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    Mr Strahan

    Two of the best posts, Ive ever read on any forum. Im enrolled in an outdoor writing course and your first post should be required reading for all guides who want to write, here or anywhere else. Really made me stop and think, thanks.

  13. #13
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    Concerning Mike's post #2. " the guide should conduct the hunt at your pace"

    OK, here's a funny. I was guiding a young chap on the AK peninsula. I would occasionaly stop to glass but also to keep from getting too excerted. The first few days all went well and the chap kept up. About the 4th day I had to "hold up" quite a bit in order for him to catch up.
    Finally, I asked if he was OK. He admitted he was kinda bloated because his last bowel movement was back in Seattle. Wow, I said we have to change the diet a bit this cant go on. No, he said it's not the diet, there's just no place to go out here.The fella never thought the bushes were a fine hideaway. He finally agrees to "hang" on the bush and then he was fine the rest of the hunt.

  14. #14
    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    Enjoy your self while you are out there you are there to hunt and have a good time. Of course you want to kill an animal but a guide is not a miracle worker sometimes no matter how hard you and he work things dont go 100% all the time, there is nothing you can do about that its hunting. I have had to spend days in the tent because of weather. Listen to your guide he is there for a reason he will keep you alive and he hopefully has the experience and expertise to give you the best chance for a successful harvest. Try to be helpful about chores and things like that but dont do too much most of us are used to doing most of the work ourselfs and have ways of doing things and it can sometimes be more difficult to have too much help, he will most likley ask for help when and where he needs it. Have expectations but realize that not every animal is going to be the next world record. Enjoy the hunt for what it is, a new experience and a hunt that you have waited a long time for and dont stress too much about the kill, it is why you are there but if you put too much on it, it will make you miss out a lot of the total experience.
    My worst experience was a gentalman that I took from the city he was not a hunter and only wanted the kill not the hunt he didnt know how to operate the bolt action rifle he brought and bearly knew how to shoot. But before he left home he watched a video about calling moose on the east cost of Canada and argued with me for eight days about how to call moose, to him I was doing it all wrong. He finally listened to me and on the ninth day was successful with a 60" bull. There was a lot more than that and during that hunt he made me so miserable that I was ready to give up 17 years of hunting/fishing guiding and do something else, anything else. My next hunter made me remember why I do what I do and why I love what I do.
    Pretty much I repeated what Michael Strayhand said in his post although his is written much better, the most important thing is that you have fun and enjoy it, you are finally there. My priorities as a guide are: Safety first and formost, second is that you enjoy yourself, and third is a successful kill.
    I am sure that your guide will have the same priorities most likley in that order.
    Good luck be safe and have fun. I am sure all of us here at AOD expect a full writeup with pics upon your return.

  15. #15
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Some great advice here. So what kind of hunt have you booked and where are you going. I will second a couple of statements. Shoot, shoot and shoot some more. I don't care if you have shot the rifle all your life. Practice and put 200 rounds, at least, through it the month before you leave and not from bags on a bench. Get in shape!!!!!!!!!!! Help out when and where you can. Attitude will get you in trouble or save you. I spent 11 days on a river with a guide and it rainned most of the day every day. I think that we saw the sun for a hour one day. We had one chance on day 6 but got busted, no ones fault. We hunted hard and spent alot of hours glassing. I had more fun with him and we worked hard. I was going home emptied handed to face my little girl and having to tell her that daddy didnt get her a bear for her bed. On the eleventh hour the good Lord rewarded our efforts literally. We were walking to the raft to go to the take out on the last day about an hour a way and a bear showed up. The moral of the story....never give up and enjoy the beauty alaska has to offer. Would I have been disappointed had I come home emptied handed.....yes. It's alot of money to spend and not connect but the experience I had was more than worth the price of admission. Just take lots of pictures and keep a log every night of what you did, ate and saw. You'll keep it for the rest of your life. Good luck and I cant wait to read the story when you get back. One final peice of advice, take a fanny pad. Something to sit on......it will make all the difference in world!
    Semper Fi and God Bless

  16. #16
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    A friend of mine "guided" goose hunters ea fall in southern IL - basically walked them out to a pit and sat in it and called the geese in - lifted lid and told them when to shoot! His name is Harold. Each year a doctor from Chicago would come down for three days of goose hunting with a cpl friends - this guy had a strong accent. First time they met and were in blind Harold called in some geese - he lifted lid and said OK shootem! Doc sat there drinking coffee - Harold said Whattt? Doc didn't even load his gun - he said "Harold, dee's is vwhat I be payin u for - jeez shoot me two and not tell tell me buddies dat you did it! Harold was in stitches but helped old Doc out and told "Doc's" buddies how great of a shot he was - he always brought a new box of shells and left 2 with Harold so his buddies thought he only shot twice. Harold said he was a great tipper!
    Oh, Harold said Doc had a side by side 10 ga that was bigger than he was and doubted Doc had ever fired it...
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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    Took a greenhorn out to kill his 1st buck ,he over 6 feet tall and strong[late 20s] I had killed one days be for low on a river hill in deep snow and knew they were there.It was a 5 mile walk on the railroad tracks and shortly after arriving I spot one 100yards up the hill ,after he reloads its down for good.We slide it down to the tracks and I said were do you want to hide it so you can find it if it snows more be for you gets back with a machine.He looks at me and said I'm not leaving it ,I rope it and start dragging .After 4 or5 hundred yards He points over the bank and says how about right there?Lol

  18. #18
    Member huntalaska's Avatar
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    Oh man don't get me started this could take a while .lol

  19. #19
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    pretty good stuff there mike...i wont add much as i have few war stories about "bad" clients...just havent had much experience with them. theres two guys i've hunted with commercially that i wouldnt go back in the field with and both were for mainly gun safety concerns (i'm especially allergic to being shot)...two out of i dont know how many. thats lots of guys so far to have two bad eggs out of...not bad.

    lol... lazy, scared, rude, with big egos...if those are criteria dubbing clients "bad" then i'm hear to tell you every grown man has potential for that! remember that people remain people...there's gonna be things you might disagree with where your guide is concerned, and vise versa...that shouldnt make the hunt anything but normal. some hunts can be a roller coaster of ups and downs and attitude and weaknesses show plainly in stressfull times or times of high anticipation...thats normal. your guide will hopefully conduct himself in a professional manner whether he "likes" you or not...part of the job.

    i've been around many guides who are sour about this end of the business...theyre always expecting the worse out of there clients and thats what they get...ie, if you've got em pegged as "bad" before they even get there than your not gonna prove yourself wrong easily...never did understand that way of thinking, but the thing i'm sure about is that it shows in there performance...

    as far as helping with camps and such....its greatly appreciated, but not needed...the guide should be able to handle ALL of the workload and most likely has a system for doing so...makeing yourself useful is nice, but getting in the way is annoying...

    ralph miller, a master guide himself and owner of deltana outfitters, told me something as a packer that has never left my mind when clients are concerned... "just remember son, theyre not idiots. in general theyre good business men, and individually theyre good at something...cause when was the last time you had 20,000 dollars to take on vacation?" this simple statement says alot and i've never forgot it. some of the best people i've met in my life are clients of mine, and the objective stance i take in dealing with all of them has done well for me.

    ...you give alot of "good" guys enough of a reason to be an *******...they will. the professionalism in which the guide conducts the hunt will dictate whether some clients are thought of as "bad" or "good"

    as a guide i try to see the best in the people i get as clients, and by the end of the hunt, i've usually found it...amazing what attitude can do to a hunt, and while i'd love to stress to an audience full of potential clients that YOUR attitude as a client has much to do with the outcome of the hunt....in reality as a guide...as the hunt leader...MY attitude is MUCH more important.

    i hope you enjoy a great hunt with a great guide...this state has many to offer... contrary to what some would have you beleive.

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