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Thread: Two hours - plus

  1. #1

    Default Two hours - plus

    No camo - no gortex - no "MB205" pack frames. Just "two plus hours" of some great hunts from the late forties to early sixties. Certainly puts a lot of the current forum threads in prospective.
    Joe

  2. #2

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    "This is my Alaska" ??? Ha ha I have some photos from the early 50's of my Grandpa and his buds hunting . Seem like red and black checkerboard wool was the camo of choice back then!!! They never seemed to have any trouble killing moose...

    I went through my Camo phase. Now I just wear whats comfortable. I like seeing photos from the late 60's-70's where guys are soaking wet with a huge Sheep and they're wearing BLUE JEANS!! How is that possible???? Ha ha I hunted in blue jeans until a few years ago. I know a guy who Guides moose hunters wearing them to this day. He doesn't waste his money on "fancy" gear. ha

  3. #3
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    I would have to agree but try to buy that wool clothing today and see what you pay for it. You'll pay just as much if not more that you would for some hunting clothing.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

  4. #4

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    It is amusing to read some of these threads. Hard to imagine how the average fifteen year old kid can ever afford to go hunting (and be successful) given the amount of equipment required. At a minimum "success" would seem to require several full sets of "camo" clothing; a GPS; a range finder; a high-teck back pack from Barney's (better yet one custom made); some $300.00 custom knife; cell phone; special socks; high-teck gloves; special holder on the "custom" pack the carry the rifle. Certainly only a parcial list, but a pretty good start.
    Probably one thing about which my "little subsistance buddy" can agree.
    Joe

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperCub View Post
    "This is my Alaska" ??? Ha ha I have some photos from the early 50's of my Grandpa and his buds hunting . Seem like red and black checkerboard wool was the camo of choice back then!!! They never seemed to have any trouble killing moose...

    I went through my Camo phase. Now I just wear whats comfortable. I like seeing photos from the late 60's-70's where guys are soaking wet with a huge Sheep and they're wearing BLUE JEANS!! How is that possible???? Ha ha I hunted in blue jeans until a few years ago. I know a guy who Guides moose hunters wearing them to this day. He doesn't waste his money on "fancy" gear. ha

  5. #5

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    I'd trade all my gear in for the opportunity to go hunt back when hunting pressure was light, and game was very abundant.

  6. #6
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    It is amusing to read some of these threads. Hard to imagine how the average fifteen year old kid can ever afford to go hunting (and be successful) given the amount of equipment required. At a minimum "success" would seem to require several full sets of "camo" clothing; a GPS; a range finder; a high-teck back pack from Barney's (better yet one custom made); some $300.00 custom knife; cell phone; special socks; high-teck gloves; special holder on the "custom" pack the carry the rifle. Certainly only a parcial list, but a pretty good start.
    Joe
    Good that you mention, "this is just a start," cause,..... I can't believe you forgot,......

    the "Spot" Messenger, "Help, someone come and get me out of trouble," device.

    surely, an absolute essential, when all the "Special Fabric-tex" seems it may let you down
    It is amusing, but that's about all it is in the days of online hunt advice/shopping

    I bet a fifteen yr old could still get a lot of hunting in, as long as he/she stayed off the internet in planning stage
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  7. #7
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Default I've posted this before...here is part of it again

    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters....%20Control.htm

    What do we really need (as opposed to merely want) in order to successfully challenge wild country and wild animals, and to hunt, kill, field dress, and transport meat and trophies in relative comfort and safety? Look at photos of the early icons of North American hunting. They carry unadorned weapons. They wear rugged, individualized clothing, often wool pants and plaid shirts. And they pack gear to fit the season, terrain, and game, including a belt knife and a frame pack suitable at once for hunting, subsisting, and hauling meat. A pair of binoculars may dangle from the archetypal traditional hunter's neck, and tucked away in pockets are compass and map.

    A few more essentials — you know the list as well as I do — and that's all she wrote.

    In order to hunt safely, comfortably, with dignity and success, we don't need a $6,000 ATV perched on a $2,000 trailer pulled by a $40,000 SUV to get us there. We don't need "scent-proof" designer camo clothing, electronic trail-timers and motion-sensitive infrared cameras, automatic game "feeders," optical range-finders, cell phones, night vision optics, a pharmacopoeia of chemical scents and scent-killers, Taj Mahal portable ground blinds and tree stands, on and on el barfo. Perusing the ads in most hunting magazines and outdoor gear catalogs today is enough to make serious, old-style outdoorsmen and women laugh out loud … and then break down and weep for what our beloved sport has lost.

    Certainly, I don't condemn all of the stuff enumerated above, though I sure condemn some of it. Nor am I saying it's all useless junk. I am saying that none such expensive toys are necessary for a good, safe, and successful hunt, and that often such stuff serves primarily to encumber us, slow us down, steal our traveling money, and generally interfere with achieving happy and satisfying ends.

    A hunter is rich in relation to the amount of stuff he or she can afford to hunt without.

  8. #8
    Member Hoyt's Avatar
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    These threads always make me laugh.

  9. #9
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    Well when i first hunted in alaska i didnt own any toys 4 wheelers boat I just looked at a topo and drove my 17 year old truck to the side of the road and started walking, seen alot of game and sign, 15 years later i own all the toys and fancy stuff and think I need a 40,000 rig, but in reality you dont. i love to wear wool espically the old army wool shirts that are getting harder and harder to find.
    i believe there are greeat opportunities for everyone and alot of areas are overlooked for the simple walk in back country hunter.
    dont get me wrong technolgy is a great thing and it should be embrassed but definately no necessary to have a fun , safe successful hunt

  10. #10
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bushrat View Post
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters....%20Control.htm
    ...is enough to make serious, old-style outdoorsmen and women laugh out loud …
    OMG!, Mark, you actually spelled out "laugh out loud". You are like, totally vintage! lol

    That is like, So funny! gtg, my new sheep hunting app just finished downloading!
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
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  11. #11

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    The batcave approach to hunting certainly has made inroads on this forum. You hear this all of the time when you see guys dropping serious change at SW. The pack debate illustrated a lot of those views. A top notch river boat sells for north of 60K retail. You can buy a small Latin American country for the amount of resources involved in a Super Cub. You also see droves of hunters with 4 10K AtVs with all manner of trailers and camo. Some of these hunters wear camo outfits that run 1000 dollars for the entire "fashion" ensemble.

    However, you can go the other way. It is a contest on my summer tramping ground to find discarded tents, duck hunting coveralls, packs, canned goods and other strange stuff that gets dumped when the hunters hit the alders above treeline. People will buy the most expensive of one type of gear and neglect what items are really important.

    Every hunter going into the country should have good boots, good socks, a storm-proof tent, and a sleeping bag that will be warm even if it gets wet. Beyond that you can take a 11lb rifle into the mountains, or a ironsighted lever action. This was true in the old days as it is today. Joe, I am sure you have talked with Howard Knudson(He was perhaps the only other guide in AK history who carried a H+H- his was a magazine 300.) many times. He never subjected himself to cold camps but would have the best svea stove(may still be the best stove made) and other gear that could allow his clients to get to places where they generally couldn't go. People who use crappy-poor fitting boots, cotton socks, a cheap walmart tent and sleeping bag will figure out that Alaska can dump misery on people quickly. I bet that you might also give a hint about how many times clients with the fanciest cracker-jack untested weatherby rifles might resort to a swap with your more battle scarred tool.

    I think that the eternal conflict of time and resources has hurt hunters throughout Alaskan history. People either have no time and a great number of resources that can help them with success or they have all the time in the world but do not have the necessary resources to get where they can develop the learning necessary to become better more successful hunters.

    The other thing that happens is that people have more money then time and spend their entire year trying to model after the "top" hunters that they notice on the net. They will buy stuff that they will give them an "extra-advantage" to getting that once in a lifetime animal. They aren't into the experience as much. I was amused at a conversion that I overheard while I was looking at the marked down rifles at a box store. The counterman was convincing a GI that a 44 mag was not adequate for bear defense. The GI needed to sell it to some sucker cheap and buy a brand new SW 500. The salesman was in his 30s and clearly was not even in Alaska for more than a year or two. The GI looked poisoned. Somebody had told him that a 44 was fine for defense when he was fishing and he was worried about bears.
    I quickly asked the GI if he was any good with the 44 and he said that he was working on it but that it was hard to control. I told him that if I was a bear and was looking at eating him that I would rather have him shooting that 500 because it was less likely that he was going to hit me. I would really hate it if he used 44 special loads because he might hit me every single time. I left them after that.


    I have personally advocated the dumpster diver's guide to gear collection. People know where my thoughts lie.

    Sincerely,
    Thomas

  12. #12
    Member Hoyt's Avatar
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    I hunt with a combination of "new" and "old." I concede that there are many products out there that are not worth a **** (waste of money), but there are also a number of products that are so much better than the "great old gear." Who cares what your pack board is made of; you still have to carry the 100 lb moose quarters out. Why would you want to break your back with a wood/canvas board (the good old gear), then carry it on a light weight/ergonomically correct pack (new crappy stuff)? Do you think it makes you manlier? I own many pieces of wool gear, and as someone mentioned on here, it is very expensive. It's good stuff, and has a purpose/place in my hunting bag, but it isn't as good as Gore-Tex in some circumstances. By the way....the "old gear" the "great hunters" used back in the day was...get this..... NEW AND CUTTING EDGE for their time period! We should all strip down to loin clothes and stick bows....let’s get real old school!

  13. #13
    Member Hoyt's Avatar
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    I don't own some ofmy expensive toys just for hunting either. The wife and I take several 4 wheeling trips per year....for fun. Plus we spend many more hours up river with our boat during the summer time bbq on sand bars, then we use it for hunting.

  14. #14
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    No new except boots when worn out. Most in the days got their wool for free as you kelp your gear when you got out off the military. Heck now the hunter needs a so called man cave in his home. All the old hunting can still be had but you got to get off the interstate and put life ahead of money and goodies
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  15. #15
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    that reminds me, i need to pull the heater outa my truck, don't really NEED it, like to have it, but hey back in the day they didn't even have a roof...funny how people these days think they need to be as comfortable as possible when doing anything. shoot i know some houses plumb hot water to the toilet so the seats warm...
    times be a changing..looking back is nice...but with todays developments i don't see any need to "go back" to any of the "primitive" methods or apparel. camo don't mean anything, i've seen guys get moose with a bright red truck. i'm not going to condem anyone for taking part in hunting and using techno equitment to try to have a safer hunt (ie..sat phone, spot, GPS, cell phone, techno clothes...ect) and i'm not gonna look down my nose at anyone hikin' in barefoot with a spear...we all hunt, we all are different, but i do realize its tough to support each other, because we think "our" way is better or more noble than any other.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
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    Premium Member denalihunter's Avatar
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    100% agree with Jake! 50 years ago, the old timers looked down at the new guys using fancy scopes. Generations before that, the muzzleloaders snubbed the new fangled rifle guys, and we can go back in time till we get to spears. Just called progress.
    Experience Real Alaska! www.alpinecreeklodge.com

  17. #17
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    My only problem with all the new stuff, designed for comfort, is when does it get too soft ??

    For example, the new fangled and highly raved about Spot system,
    now, there is word among CG community (Helo folks) I mean, that there are apparently so many calls coming in that "Crying wolf" is becoming an issue as to when to launch.

    This last fall some folks had been calling to be Helo-lifted out from somewhere on Kodiak, because
    "they were surrounded by Bears, and scared" (that's true, calling the Coast Guard !!)
    And interestingly enough, it was just prior to the fall that was taken by a forum member here, requiring some "Convincing of the severity, to the CG dispatcher" by one of the party, (who Knew Medevac/Helo pilot language enough) to get the message across more clearly, that help was really needed. This was explained to me by a CG guy here in Kodiak

    Do you get it? my question, as to comfort REQUIRED by the hunting community when this is all going a bit too far?

    Then when does all the fancy gear actually begin to get in the way ?
    I bought a rangefinder this last year, used on all my hunts, seemed really cool to have, but in the end it's just stats for the story I guess, cause I don't need to take long shots anyway, it all ends up being one more thing to do, be distracted by, when getting up close.
    It's all fun, but I gotta admit, I went for that cause I spent too much time thinking about the hunt online.

    How many times do we read on here, stories of someone's fancy Super-Fabric raingear failing in the clutch?
    That's one item I don't plan on trying out, when "Out There For Real" but,
    lots of people try to find the perfect comfort deal, maybe at some fair risk to serious discomfort ??
    maybe worse ??
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  18. #18
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    theres always been "soft" hunters, just before they died in the woods or didn't get far enough from the truck to make it.
    some of the new gear gives a false confidence...then they know they can just call the coasties to get them out so they do stuff they aren't capable of...
    workin' beyond ones capacity..those people will aways be there. but those are some good points of misuse of the techno junk...maybe if it came with a little package of common sense that'd be good?!
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
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  19. #19
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    shoot i got ya all beat.. was out chasing around after a grizz last spring with Dainel in ak and his bro... no gun ... no shoes... in just my boxers.. 114 in the sun was hot out.. lots of skeeters on the yukon in boxer shorts... YUP! pm him...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Good to see my "little guiding friend" can agree with me too.

    Patrick McManus wrote alot on the very subject, and inna way that I can relate ~~LOL!!~~

    You dont need expensive, gear for sure, though 1/2 of what I have is Milsurp, the other 1/2 homemade, because it is "The Best" and Ive lived this long relativly unscathed, all kids alive.
    Milsurp is made for the outdoors, is usually cheap and rough n ready. If it can go to War, it can go hunting.

    Me and this woman can make stuff, as it used to be for all Hunters and their wives......... was a real pleasure hunting Ptarmigan in new Hard bottom Mukluks today, even in a 30 mph wind.
    Theres no other way to have a wind, warm to -50 clothing, you can sleep out in and live.



    Here we made a "puuk" by skinning a Seal out its mouth, making a holeless bag strog enough to carry 3 or so Seals worth of blubber and half dryed meats in.

    Its best to make your own gear, Sleds, clothes, tents, boats, harpoons, snares,traps, pouches and such, you can make it all, and tailor it to fit your needs for your local, especially if you hunt year round.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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