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Thread: How to "Operate" a pair of BINOCULARS........???

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    Default How to "Operate" a pair of BINOCULARS........???

    Most men think they are great lovers, and if given an hours instruction that they could place in the top three at the Indianapolis 500. And so My guess is most men think they know how to find game with binoculars. My experience is many can't find animals even if you show them where the animal is.

    So let's have a discussion for the new hunters on how to operate a pair of binoculars.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Do you think it is a problem with how they use the glass or what they are looking for? I still have a habit of picking out grouse when others walk right past them. I have even shocked a few buddies by spotting them off the trail while out 4wheeling. I think I hunted them so much as a kid that my eye is simply trained to pick them out. I will say that I see more with higher quality glass than I ever did w/ chapo's in the past.

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    There a proper way to work a grid when spotting, but I think most young hunters were never taught how to work a grid, and even what to be looking for. There actually a lot to operating binoculars, as opposed to scanning the hillside.

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    The biggest issue I have seen is people not knowing what they are looking for. I have a hard time explaining to family and friends that you are not looking for said animal most of the time you are looking for a difference in colors or shading, outlines or movement and you have to look in the right area. Then again all of this changes when the weather or light conditions change.

    The best was the first time I went sheep hunting my wife was spotting them right off the bat and I was the one going where are they? Too used to looking for game that blended in.

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Once they get it figured out and can spot game then they have to figure out how to describe the games location to their hunting partner.

    "its over there" seems to happen more often than not when you have your back facing the person stating it so you don't even have an idea what direction they were glassing in
    "next to the rock" there are rocks in Alaska?
    "by the bush" oh yeah that one
    "on the edge of that lake" mind you there are 20 lakes/ponds in front of you

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    There a proper way to work a grid when spotting, but I think most young hunters were never taught how to work a grid, and even what to be looking for. There actually a lot to operating binoculars, as opposed to scanning the hillside.
    Working grids is a huge help at times when the game is in an area that lets it blend in real well. Takes lots of patience thats for sure. I seem to use this the most when glassing for bears or moose in high brush areas.

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Agl, Got more on "Working Grids ?"

    I was taught one thing that really helps me slow down, look better,

    I'll see if I can describe it;
    Take the full view you have at any one time, and split the "screen" or "Circle" into four quarters, like fourths of a Pie, then scan each of those individually, vs. just scanning the whole available "View" you have through your scope or Binos.

    Does that make sense, helps to stop Excessive Scanning, and Slow Me Down to look better at each little Alder patch, depression, etc.

    Great Thread Idea, I've been meaning to ask something like this of those with much more experience on than I have.
    Not Necessarily, What to look for but, "How To Most Effectively Use Your Glassing Instrument ??"
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    I am hoping others will chime in. The grid works just like reading. I will quick scan the open areas. Then just like reading start at the top left and slowly glass left to right, but only a narrow horizontal line on the imaginary grid. Then go back to the start point and drop down a line and again slowly read the mountain/valley/meadow left to right. Then drop down another line on the imaginary grid and repeat. More later, got animals to feed.

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    The first few days after being out of the glassing seen for a couple months it takes me a bit to "warm up" and get back into the mode of what I am looking for. Usually seeing one of the animal I am looking for in an new area helps to get the "size" thing down. Having no perspective can make a porcupine look like a grizzly bear at first glance a mile away if above brushline and nothing to gauge its size in relation to anything.

    The last part of the video here explains the grid glassing pattern pretty well and its pretty much how I break an area down after a quick scan of the whole area looking for the obvious animal in the open or something.

    Just jump to about the 3:00 mark to skip the Leica promo
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8RAYN..._order&list=UL

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    Once I figure out which end to look through I usually get good results. I think some things are just intuitive by there very nature and teaching someone how to "operate" such a device can prove exceedingly difficult. Then again it all depends.......
    “There's a humorous side to every situation. The challenge is to find it.”
    George Carlin

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    Having no perspective can make a porcupine look like a grizzly bear at first glance a mile away if above brushline and nothing to gauge its size in relation to anything.
    Or a fox like a wolf?

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    A lot of folks don't realize how well a thousand pound moose can hide. Also people don't realize how much texture to the land that there is. How could a moose hide in the open like that? Is a question I get from newbies.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

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    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billhicksmostfunny View Post
    Once I figure out which end to look through I usually get good results.
    TFF!!!

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Or a fox like a wolf?
    I actually was ready to stalk a stump bear once.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkb View Post
    I actually was ready to stalk a stump bear once.
    Oh, I don't know anything about that. And hunt_ak and I definitely have never taken off after a fox thinking it was a wolf.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkb View Post
    A lot of folks don't realize how well a thousand pound moose can hide. Also people don't realize how much texture to the land that there is. How could a moose hide in the open like that? Is a question I get from newbies.
    I have had them stand up 30 feet away from me in a "clearing". One in particular we had no idea he was there and 20 more feet we would have stepped on him.

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    Member slimm's Avatar
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    Not sure if i can explain this very well,, Move your eyes not the binos,, i don't move my binos until i have searched everything in that view.
    Something else that helps is resting em on some shooting sticks when really trying to pick an area apart very steady especially with the higher power glass, also helps with fatigue..

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by jkb View Post
    I actually was ready to stalk a stump bear once.

    Don't know if Curly Warren is still using that nice Grizzly Photo for his advertising. But an Italian Hunter and I had been storm bound in the bomb shelter for two days when the sky turned blue.

    Step out of the tent and stretch and glass a bit. I spotted a porcupine and pointed at it, he thought it was a grizzly bear. I said, No Porcupine. He want to talk a photo, and we needed a stretch and as it was mid afternoon we walked over there.

    So it was not a porcupine but a nice Grizzly. We were about 45 yards away. I pointed behind my shoulder, and gave the thumbs-up sign. The bear was in a clearing with tall willows on three sides. The bear was broadside, and looking straight at us.

    I had my cross hairs in front of the bear as I expected it to run straight ahead if hit. Boom the custom built Feurlocke goes off. the Bear disappears from my scope. But a Had a faint memory of the bear being sucked straight down to the earth faster than I would have thought a bear could drop. But there it was when I lower the scope in a pile.

    !/2 hour of Photos and it is time to go to work. Now I had been moving the bear for photos several times and was sure it was dead. But I wanted to check if the bullet exited so it did not get lost if it was just inside the skin. Well it had not only not exited, it had NOT ENTERED. I jumped back about 12' feet in two jumps. Then very carefully examined every part of that bear, there was NO Hole in that bear, None.

    Now I am not the brightest pumpkin in the pumpkin patch. But I figure either the bear is not dead or I am having a very bad nightmare. I check the eyes, nothing. Check the nose nothing. Look down the mouth nothing. I stick my little finger down each nostril and one has blood. None was on the face when we did the photo shoot.

    There was a stiff wind when he shot, anyway the bullet went right up the nostril perfect center. And did not exit the back of the skull. Very pretty bear.

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    AGL4now that is one of your best bear stories thank you!

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Wow, phenomenal story there Agl,
    Didn't exit the back of the skull,....do you remember the caliber/bullet wt used there.
    just curious as that Bear Skull material does look really thick around there to me.
    So it may in fact be bullet stopping thick ?

    Anyway, no thread drift allowed,... good glassing for that guy, eh?

    The nicest Caribou I have killed was spotted from a ridge top away,
    just one single antler tine (just four inches of it visible) in an Alder thicket.
    Bedded down I looked at it for a Long Time, convinced, that's Antler material, not Alder....

    it was, ..........but it was either Miraculous Glassing (more probable) or patience galore...
    It sure taught me to fight my urge to go too fast as best I can.
    Every little tip helps,

    I also like the idea from that video, of keeping the last half of your former view in the picture as you move your grid.
    Just doublechecking always. works well for me
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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