Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: tree stand shooting

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    north pole
    Posts
    336

    Default tree stand shooting

    ok guys im looking for info on shooting a bow from a tree stand for bear baiting i plan on being about 12ft. up and i would guss 20yd from the bait do you have to aim low or anything also do you guys stand up to shoot or shoot while sitting the stand i got has the bar around the front so im not sure how thats gona work if you shoot while sitting i might just have to lean way forward, thanks scott

  2. #2
    Member blasterak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    14A
    Posts
    913

    Default

    Yup, you have to aim slightly lower in most cases, unless you sight in from the stand. I always shoot when sitting in my stand, makes it much quieter and less chance of being spotted, unless your standing already.... I'd recommend practicing shots from the treestand(sitting and standing), maybe setup in your backyard if you can.

  3. #3
    Member skybust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    alaska
    Posts
    2,426

    Default

    akscotty sight your bow shooting from the tree stand not sure what type of bow you have but I put my pin right where I want the arrow to hit you should have to aim low. I shoot standing and sitting that way you are ready for anything. Also when shooting make sure you put the clothes on that you will be wearing when hunting.. Hope this helps baiting bear is a blast I cant wait Chris

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    north pole
    Posts
    336

    Default

    i am shooting a mathews z7extreme its only 28"ata so im hopeing i will be able to work around the bar and i will make sure to set my sights from the stand before i go thanks guys.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    kodiak
    Posts
    50

    Default

    You don't need to sight in from a tree stand or aim low. The reason people shoot high from a tree stand in improper form. when shooting from a tree stand you need to bend at the waist to keep you torso in a "T" as if you are shooting on the ground. people shoot high because the just drop their bow arm and don't bend at the waist. You are not that high in the tree at 12ft. and shooting at 20 yards the angle will not be that great. Even with improper form will probably will not even see much of a distance. If you were @ 30ft and only shooting 10 yards it makes a huge difference.

  6. #6
    Member skybust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    alaska
    Posts
    2,426

    Default

    The reason why I suggest to shot from his tree stand so he would be used to shooting from a tree stand should have used different wording.

  7. #7
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Spenard
    Posts
    1,232

    Default

    If it's 20 yards from the tree to your bait (or rather your bear) just hold right on at 20. You don't need to aim low - it's the horizontal distance that counts. You only need to aim low if the shot is steep and you're measuring the distance from your stand (such as with a range finder) - in which case the horizontal distance from the tree to the bear is less than what you get with the rangefinder. As stickslinger said, at most distances you're going to be shooting from a stand it probably won't make a difference.

    If you have to stand up to shoot, I would try to stand up and get ready before a bear gets in on a bait. From my experience, bears coming in to bait are on high alert (for other bears that might run them off). I've had bears respond to the slightest bit of movement in the stand getting ready for a shot - I think they hear the movement more than see it - but it's pretty incredible what they pick up on at that range.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  8. #8
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    3,185

    Default

    Stand at the base of your tree (under your stand) and use your rangefinder to measure landmarks around your bait. I've seen guys staple paper plates with the ranges on them to trees around the area for quick reference as well. When you are up in the tree, simply use the right pin for the distances you measured from the ground. Like was mentioned, it is the horizontal distance that you need to know. Unless the bear is right under you, 12' isn't really high enough to induce much error.
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    north pole
    Posts
    336

    Default

    ok i see so as long as your upper body is as it would be shooting on the ground just aim were i want to hit, as long as your not shooting on a very steep angle, so i should be able to just lean foreward a little and turn my upper body to the right and be good to go, i will give it a shot when it warms up and have it down before may. thanks guys

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    north pole
    Posts
    634

    Default

    my stand was approx 12 feet high and 20 yards from bait and i aimed dead on.

  11. #11
    Member fishnngrinn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    296

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wiso_67 View Post
    my stand was approx 12 feet high and 20 yards from bait and i aimed dead on.
    Michigan hunt for deer: I put a stick in the ground, 20 yards from the base of the tree my stand was in. A black squirrel hopped down the ridge and right up to my stick. I decided to take the shot, aimed right on with 20 yard pin, heart shot pinned the squirrel to the ground. I did not get a deer that trip, but was very proud of the trophy squirrel.
    NRA Lifetime Member

  12. #12
    Member Mort's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Niceville, FL
    Posts
    459

    Default

    While your angle might not require a change in effective distance, you still need to compensate for where to aim to ensure you catch the vitals. Your stand is not very high, so you shouldn't need to make much adjustment (if the bear is right at the bait), but still choose an entry point that will cut the vitals; just like you would aim aft for an animal quartering away, you may need to adjust your impact point to be slightly high when shooting down. The steeper the angle, the higher on the animal you need to hit so the vitals are hit on the way to the exit wound.

  13. #13
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,008

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mort View Post
    While your angle might not require a change in effective distance, you still need to compensate for where to aim to ensure you catch the vitals. Your stand is not very high, so you shouldn't need to make much adjustment (if the bear is right at the bait), but still choose an entry point that will cut the vitals; just like you would aim aft for an animal quartering away, you may need to adjust your impact point to be slightly high when shooting down. The steeper the angle, the higher on the animal you need to hit so the vitals are hit on the way to the exit wound.
    Assuming a quartering away or nearly broadside shot, when shooting from above aim for the offside armpit and you will bisect the boiler room.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  14. #14
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    Don't overthink it. That's why most people miss. You tell yourself to aim high or aim low and you will miss BIG high or low. Put that pin right where you want it and let 'er eat. Any bow of reasonable speed will hit a 4" circle from 15 yards to 23 yards. The big differences come when you are WAY up in a tree and the critter is only 10 yards from the tree. Always shoot for the horizontal distance and you will be good.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    76

    Default Stand hunting

    I grew up back east an hunted whitetails from a stand, never had a who much over 20 yds. I have to agree with AKDoug don't think too much just make the shot. Practice as much as you can before the season starts and get your confidence up. Can't go wrong if your confident in your equiptment and your shooting distances.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •