Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Michale Strahan float hunting seminars

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    107

    Default Michale Strahan float hunting seminars

    There seem to be a few guys really respected in the float hunting field. One is Michael Strahan (he also runs this message board)


    Heíll be giving seminars in Anchorage and Fairbanks:
    http://web.me.com/strahanak/Lost_Cre.../Seminars.html

    He is giving six 1-hour seminars at the Great Alaskan Sportsman show in April. I assume the show has an admission price of $5-10. So the seminars are basically free.
    Has anyone ever attended his seminars? I could probably use frequent flier miles to get to Anchorage for free. Does that seem worth the effort and time??

  2. #2

    Default

    For sure, Mike has a lot of valuable information to share. Whether or not you'll find it worth flying from WI is another story.

    One thing that's unique about today's information sharing is that most of everything Mike and others will talk about has already been shared for free on forums like this one.

    For the time you'll spend to get here, you might spend the same amount on researching the Float Hunting threads and search engine key words to get a literal ton of good tips from each person who posts on the topic, which would otherwise be missed at a single a seminar session.

    just a thought.

    larry

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mad_angler View Post
    There seem to be a few guys really respected in the float hunting field. One is Michael Strahan (he also runs this message board)


    Heíll be giving seminars in Anchorage and Fairbanks:
    http://web.me.com/strahanak/Lost_Cre.../Seminars.html

    He is giving six 1-hour seminars at the Great Alaskan Sportsman show in April. I assume the show has an admission price of $5-10. So the seminars are basically free.
    Has anyone ever attended his seminars? I could probably use frequent flier miles to get to Anchorage for free. Does that seem worth the effort and time??

    I went last year and while it was a good seminar I would not fly to see one. I would buy the book that Micheal Strahan wrote "Float Hunting Alaska". The book is what was pretty much covered in the seminar.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    107

    Default

    Larry,
    I've already spent countless hours researching old threads. I'll probably spend many more. I figured 6 hours of talking might provide another level of information. I also figured I could check out all the booths and learn from them.

    In fact, I was hoping that you and Pristine Ventures would have a booth and I could pick your brain in person...

    Tim

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    Iíve been to both Mike and Larry float hunting seminar and they were very good. If there was a DVD of there talk it would be worth the money. I agree there is a lot cover in the book, along with new information. Maybe Mike and Larry could tape there seminar and sell the tapes?

  6. #6

    Default

    I agree with what others are saying. I have been to one of Mike's seminars and I have read his book. I am sure even Mike himself would agree that it would be a better investment to purchase the book than fly to AK to see a seminar. The seminar's are good but it is kind of like watching a movie about a book you just read. The movie never does the book any justice.

  7. #7
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Eagle River (Home!)
    Posts
    1,285

    Default

    I have been to both Larry's and Mike's and others seminars that are often offered during the sportsman shows in Fairbanks and Anchorage over the past 10 years.

    I think I have seen Mike's 4 times. Both are great seminars but instead of flying I would get their books and the mentioned DVDs (you can buy them from this site). I read Larry's first book in a weekend and Mike's in a week, seems I could not put them down. I like the sportsmans shows and I admit I often have attended all 4 days in Anchorage in order to go to the seminars I want to.

  8. #8
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,766

    Default

    I just found this thread...

    You guys give me more credit than I'm due... but I'm glad you have benefitted from the book and the seminars.

    The seminar thing is kinda strange when you think about it. The venue is noisy and sometimes it's hard to be heard. Also you only get one hour per session, but it really ends up about 45 minutes or so, by the time the previous guy gets off the platform, you get set up, and then try to get off the stage for the next guy. So a few years ago (I've done the Anchorage show since 1991) I started going for the last time slots in the day and running my seminars back-to-back. This gives me time to do Q&A with the group (my favorite part), and I don't have to get off the platform for the next guy. Having the last slot allows me to stay over if people want to do that. The show doesn't close for an hour after the last seminar, and we have often used up that whole extra hour. It's a blast. Anyway, my latest method is to do Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 back-to-back, often letting the audience choose from a menu of related topics. Each one focuses on different aspects of float hunting (and there's a ton of stuff in there that relates to drop camp hunts too). Folks seem to like it, and it's been a lot of fun.

    To our poster from Wisconsin- it's a long ways to fly, friend. I don't know if I would do it. Yes, I have 14 hours of seminars at the show this spring, but many are repeats for people who cannot attend every day. The titles are, "Care of Big-Game Meat and Trophies", "Planning Your Alaska Float Hunt", "Gearing up for Float Hunting", and "Advanced Float Hunting Tactics". And then I have an hour some days to do live Q&A. So really, out of all those hours, there are only four different hour-long seminars. Not six.

    The book, "Float Hunting Alaska's Wild Rivers", started as a distillation of the seminars. But then it grew. The original manuscript was 1200 pages (not counting graphics), but much of that was fluff and logorrhea (look it up). :-) The final edition is around 550 pages, including illustrations. We did cut a lot of stuff I wanted to keep, but we had to do some serious pruning to keep the thing to a manageable size. The final copy is worded pretty tightly, and there is indeed a lot of content packed in there. If I were you, I would take the advice to get the book. If you have questions after that, I am more than happy to talk with you on the phone. I also run a consultation service where I actually work with you to create and execute a float hunt in Alaska. You might be interested in that too. If you do decide to come to Alaska during the show, you will really enjoy it and will probably make some solid connections if you put in the effort. I would be more than happy to spend some time with you then, perhaps over dinner, if you find something like that useful.

    You might also look over our float hunting section in the bookstore. There are 34 titles in there that relate to float hunting in some way. Larry does a great job with video and we have his stuff in there too. Of particular interest is Project Bloodtrail, and Wilderness Taxidermy, both of which focus on proper meat and trophy care, missing little of significance. This is a special passion of mine and it's nice to see something out there about it on DVD.

    Thanks again for the kind words,

    Regards,

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  9. #9
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,407

    Default

    I think that Mike is right. Your talking about spending 800.00 for a seminar even if you use points it still has value not to mention food, hotel, and rentals. If you have the money to burn and it's no big deal then go and have fun. If it puts any burden at all then no. take a couple hundred buck and get Mikes book and larrys videos. To be honest I would'nt go without having read and watched them as prelude to learning and asking for detail questions. Heck, talke the money and buy all 34 titles but I will say that Mikes book is required reading and a must for anyone think of hunting and of alaska rivers.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

  10. #10
    Member Knute78's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Council Grove, Kansas
    Posts
    220

    Default

    mad angler,
    Take everyones advice and buy the books and videos. Read and watch them several times, and then book a hunt and use the FF miles for the hunt trip. Knute

  11. #11
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, AK
    Posts
    4,076

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tboehm View Post
    I think that Mike is right. Your talking about spending 800.00 for a seminar even if you use points it still has value not to mention food, hotel, and rentals. If you have the money to burn and it's no big deal then go and have fun. If it puts any burden at all then no. take a couple hundred buck and get Mikes book and larrys videos. To be honest I would'nt go without having read and watched them as prelude to learning and asking for detail questions. Heck, talke the money and buy all 34 titles but I will say that Mikes book is required reading and a must for anyone think of hunting and of alaska rivers.

    Ditto on getting Mike's book. It was what got us going on our hunt.

  12. #12
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    3

    Default

    I am new to the forum, but the research I have done on this site so far has been extremely helpful. I am one in a group of three who are making a float trip for moose this September. I will be ordering the books and videos mentioned here and we continue to search for more information to make our trip as great as possible. I do have one question for the experienced Alaskan hunters: We have a 15ft Levitator raft rented for the trip, but are undecided on whether to use a tow raft for gear or rent a second raft. Any suggestions? With 3 people we feel we at least need a tow raft, but that may not be the best route to go. Any help from the more experienced would be greatly appreciated.

  13. #13

    Default

    You shouldn't tow rafts unless it's under propulsion. Very dangerous. It will not track right in the water unless it is being rowed. I would rent a second raft like a 12ft or so, another way to go is maybe rent a canoe such as a pro pioneer.

  14. #14
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Thanks for the input. I wasn't worried too much about the danger of towing a raft since the river we are floating is very slow and winding. Just thought the hunting experience might be a little better if we were all 3 in the same raft. We can rent a 2nd raft if a tow raft is definitely not the best choice. I was concerned that a tow raft with gear and (hopefully) a couple of moose would be like an anchor.

  15. #15

    Default

    Well it's just not dangerous it will be hard for the tow raft to be avoiding obstacles such as trees and such. Unless pulling a raft behind another raft it's hard for it to track in a straight line. I just would think it would be a headache. I would rent a second raft if I were you.

  16. #16
    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,159

    Default

    Towing a raft has the potential to turn into a disaster or worse. Try it on local waters before your remote float hunt. If you still insist on this option, make sure you have another frame/oar setup or at least paddles when you decide to place part of your group in the second boat.

  17. #17
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,766

    Default

    On towing rafts... I've done this with and without the use of an outboard, and it does work in some situations. But really it's not the best idea. Too many ways for things to go wrong, to end up out of position and having to maneuver constantly to keep that thing under control. When you're hunting the last thing you need is another distraction, and that's exactly what a towed boat will be-- a distraction.

    You are much better off to put a simple rowing setup on that boat and put a man in it.

    You mentioned that you thought the hunt would be better if you were all three in the same boat. But the problem is that three of you will make a lot more noise than two (loud talking, joking, laughing...). The sounds you make in a raft, whether it's a squeaky oarlock or talking, will echo over the relatively flat surface of the river, and bounce around several corners before dying out. You will alert game that you are coming. Not a good thing to do when you're in stealth mode.

    [added later] I should also mention that the above applies only to slow Class I rivers. You should never attempt this on moving water, as the others have said.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
    Last edited by Michael Strahan; 01-27-2011 at 22:21.
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  18. #18

    Default

    BAD IDEA!!! The bow and stern swap ends perpetually - big load - big nightmare!!
    Just my thoughts
    Goo

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Leavenworth Wa.
    Posts
    234

    Default

    Being a life member of the Alaskan Bowhunters, I would love to see Mike or Larry put on a seminar at one of our weekend gatherings,usually in March.GR

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •