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Thread: Any Place sell Suture Sets in Anchorage........?

  1. #1

    Default Any Place sell Suture Sets in Anchorage........?

    Is there a retail outlet in Anchorage that sells "Suture Sets"........?

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Well I dunno... I plan on ordering all of my first aid stuff from Amazon. They have sterile suture packs for about 3 bucks each. I plan on picking up a few of those and they also have surgical staple kits and quik clot as well as mini surgical tool kits.

    http://www.amazon.com/Braunamid-Synt...044799&sr=8-16

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    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    I would try Eagle Enterprises, since they sell the big backcountry med kits, but other than that I don't know who I'd try locally. I've been looking at them on Amazon, also.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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    Thank you........

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Sutures for humans are a federally restricted "prescription" item. So you have to buy vet supplies. You really do not want the 3/0 size material linked in the previous post. You want either 4/0 or 5/0 Ethilon (preferably both) for external suturing of human skin. In addition to the needle and thread, you must have a needle driver and small scissors at a minimum.

    Note- if you were doing this in a clinical setting, suturing requires a half liter or more of sterile saline solution (for washing out the wound), 20mL syringe and ZeroWet shield (for flushing out wound), a bulk pack of sterile 4x4 gauze (suturing causes a lot of bleeding and you must constantly clean as you go), a 27g needle and 3mL or 5mL syringe, anesthetic injection (Lidocaine 1% is most common), a sterile field work surface drape, a sterile field drape for the wound, sterile gloves, sterile needle driver, sterile scissors, sterile skin forceps, and a sterile dressing to cover the finished wound.

    I'd rather just carry dressings and a stapler. You can quickly close a wound with the stapler and it can also be quickly and easily opened later for proper treatment by a professional that has all the right stuff listed above plus the required skills to do it correctly. Suturing is a somewhat complicated skill with great chances for really mucking it up.

    http://www.amazon.com/Skin-Stapler-3...6067683&sr=1-1
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  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Sutures for humans are a federally restricted "prescription" item. So you have to buy vet supplies. You really do not want the 3/0 size material linked in the previous post. You want either 4/0 or 5/0 Ethilon (preferably both) for external suturing of human skin. In addition to the needle and thread, you must have a needle driver and small scissors at a minimum.

    Note- if you were doing this in a clinical setting, suturing requires a half liter or more of sterile saline solution (for washing out the wound), 20mL syringe and ZeroWet shield (for flushing out wound), a bulk pack of sterile 4x4 gauze (suturing causes a lot of bleeding and you must constantly clean as you go), a 27g needle and 3mL or 5mL syringe, anesthetic injection (Lidocaine 1% is most common), a sterile field work surface drape, a sterile field drape for the wound, sterile gloves, sterile needle driver, sterile scissors, sterile skin forceps, and a sterile dressing to cover the finished wound.

    I'd rather just carry dressings and a stapler. You can quickly close a wound with the stapler and it can also be quickly and easily opened later for proper treatment by a professional that has all the right stuff listed above plus the required skills to do it correctly. Suturing is a somewhat complicated skill with great chances for really mucking it up.

    http://www.amazon.com/Skin-Stapler-3...6067683&sr=1-1
    JOAT, we are debating this on a different forum, and it appears you are correct. This is something I know nothing about. I carry QuickClot and a fairly extensive (self assembled) first aid kit.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    I'd rather just carry dressings and a stapler. You can quickly close a wound with the stapler and it can also be quickly and easily opened later for proper treatment by a professional that has all the right stuff listed above plus the required skills to do it correctly. Suturing is a somewhat complicated skill with great chances for really mucking it up.
    This is probably a stupid question, but with the stapler you just... staple, right? There's no trick to it or anything?

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dreamerofdreams View Post
    This is probably a stupid question, but with the stapler you just... staple, right? There's no trick to it or anything?
    youtube to the rescue!

  9. #9

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    Quick Clot caution...

    Read up on this before you need to use it. This product gets hot and chemical burns have resulted. In 2006 I personally took care of a Soldier who was fragged (?) or shot (?) in his right arm and the quick clot seared his nerves rendering his right hand's motor nerves nonfunctional. Don't recall his sensory perception. I've personally cared for a few Soldiers that have had varying levels of burn injuries from this, the hand guy being the saddest (mid 20's spec ops, with a permanently dysfunctional hand) a really great guy. The Army moved away from this product due to the chemical burns expereinces. If this is a last resort then go for it. If you can manage your wound otherwise then I recommend the otherwise techniques.

    Please don't take my word on this, research it...PLEASE!

    AJ

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quick clot has changed since then I believe. It is no longer used in powder from and is now impregnated in a sponge. I have spent a ton of time in trauma hospitals and the trauma docs I have talked to about it all agree that it has saved a whole pile of lives. Direct pressure should be step one but if you have heavy arterial bleeding then quick clot sure beats exsanguination!

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    youtube to the rescue!
    The things you can find on youtube! That certainly answers the question, thanks!

  12. #12
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    To my understanding the Quik Clot changed as folks were tired of pulling tiny pellets of the material out of flesh. The newer version addresses this. I keep it in my first aid kit and carry it on all remote trips. I am 100% with JOAT on the use of a surgical stapler instead of sutures. I keep a large one in my first aid kit at all times. Folks don't think about how hard it would be to suture one handed in case of an injury effecting an arm/hand. Aside from that obvious example, it is far easier to just staple a wound. They come in a few sizes, commonly a large and small, perhaps more.


    This image shows the newer Quik Clot sponge, as opposed to the granules they used to sell.



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