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Thread: This for sheep hunt?

  1. #1

    Default This for sheep hunt?

    I am planning a sheep hunt and want to float a river for access.No more than class II do you think this would be up to the task for one guy and medium sized pack dog.?Think i could throw a Caribou in as well.I am not sure how stout the construction is with the given Materials comments please.Thanks


    SATURN FD365 12' Light River Rafts / Fishing Boats

    The FD series river rafts / fishing boat are great for both fishing on a lake or river, and whitewater rafting. High rocker curves provide an exhilarating ride on whitewater like no other river raft or kayak! SATURN light river rafts are excellent whitewater paddleboats for 2-3 people.

    The FD series Fishing Rafts comes with 2 aluminum benches and set of rowing oars to get your quickly and easily to that sweet fishing spot on a lake, or to help you navigate fast river runs.

    SATURN FD365 rafts are great for fishing and exploration. They provide stable platform for standing and fly fishing for 1 or 2 people. FD365 fishing raft have plenty of space inside for your gear, cooler and bait bucket. Plywood benches allows attachment of additional accessories, such as fishing rod holders and folding seats on a swivel platform.

    FD365 comes with two convenient handles for easy transportation and D-rings for anchor attachment. Additional D-rings can be glued to the boat if necessary, and are available at our accessories section.

    FD river rafts are not self-bailers, but can be converted into self-bailers by cutting round holes, the size of a dime in bottom, along the perimeter.


    Overall Length 12'
    Overall Width 3.10'
    Inside Length 10'
    Inside Width 1.11'
    Tube Diameter 15"
    Air Chambers 5
    Floor Type High-Pressure Air floor
    Weight 35 lbs
    Shipping Size 41 x 24 x 12"
    Persons Capacity 2
    Seat Benches 2
    Color in stock light gray

    Heavy duty 1,100 Dtex High Strength PVC fabric coated on both side with 1100 g/m2, 0.9mm. Fabric is thick, puncture proof and abrasion resistant.
    New 2010 model now comes with 2 aluminum benches and rowing oars.
    Accessories: aluminum oar, repair kit, rowing oars and carry bag.
    Industry standard Halkey-Roberts flat valves design.
    Complimentary generic hand pump included.
    Rubbing strake all around the raft.
    High-pressure air deck floor.


    http://www.boatstogo.com/images/RD/R...River_1_sm.jpg

    http://www.boatstogo.com/images/RD/R...river_1_sm.jpg

    http://www.boatstogo.com/images/FD365/FD365_2_sm.jpg

  2. #2
    New member
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    Pretty much use it then trash it... hope it's not trashed while using it.

    The Saturn motto is to "get you on the water." While their real goal has been to make an entry-level, affordable inflatable... they should add, getting you 'in' the water if used in more demanding waters, dragging shallows, or piling up wilderness mileage day-in day out with loads.

    To put things in perspective, the 'Rafts' are Kenai weekenders, not really up to wilderness Alaska rigors of daily/weekly turnaround commercial use. I see this is not necessarily your plan, and that you referenced up to class II... yet keep in mind, freighting loads through the shallows will up damage probability in short order --- more-so than most boaters know (particularly the .9mm S. Korean fabric and China Assembled .9mm PVC).

    On to the good news...
    The boat you described is inexpensive, like $260 landed in Anchorage direct from China manufacturer for me - if I ever wanted one and even made to my specifications. Boat retails for around double that 'without' the Saturn Patch on the side. When you buy direct from Saturn it's doubled (like $550) plus you pay shipping from Saturn in Idaho I believe. A few Alaska vendors will call it 'Alaska proof' and triple or quadruple the asking price (to 'er off to blame shipping or claim some exclusive)... but truthfully, they are mostly the same thing from same/similar 'overseas' copies/outsourcing.

    Couple good things about purchasing these kinds of boats:
    --- Gets you out on the water
    --- Trying stuff out and having fun exploring the paddle-sports
    --- Seeing if you and others with you enjoy rafting, canoeing, and kayaking
    --- Without much investment.

    Flip-side is that you get sub-standard less-dependable equipment, cheap components/accessories, and don't make a fair shake floating the compromise inflatables. I'll add that the best way to go when using this .9 mm PVC material is to keep it small with less momentum (more canoe/kayak type with lighter weight in boat) and maintain 'er 'thoroughly clean' to routinely investigate damages, seam leaks, etc.

    Boat described will likely be fine for 3-5 years on easy water by novice to intermediate boaters, provided not lots of dragging in the shallows, being attentive to good on-water entry and exit, plus the thorough up-keep. The accessories are not to be depended on water or even around the house --- they are total play toys at best.

    Consider one-man performance to be better using frame or saddled stands and good set of oars with a spare - this will cost more and should not go cheap. Boat described is tipsy in a hurry... therefore stability-wise look to a quality, sturdy canoe/raft paddle or a long convertible kayak paddle for recovery strokes. You'll need a much better pump and more complete repair kit. My last advice, dress for conditions (maybe a dry-suit if paddling the late fall) and never skimp an a good Life Jacket.

  3. #3

    Default

    That was a great breakdown Brian. Thanks for the info.

  4. #4
    New member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Jackson View Post
    That was a great breakdown Brian. Thanks for the info.
    Thanks Brian - much appreciated.

    Think I know ya from somewhere, sometime or exchanged some good info in person or on here.

    Brian Jackson? Your name rings a bell... I never forget a face, but occasionally can't remember a name.

    Thanks again.

  5. #5
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Good plans are often 2-3 layers deep; offering a plan B, sometimes plan C.
    Putting myself in your situation and after reading Brian's thorough response, I found myself wondering - if the raft failed, then what?

    Raft failures don't occur often maybe, but the odds on a remote float could be better:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...t=raft+failure

    The first priority in planning a remote Alaska trip is to make it back safely. Game/fish/good times follow.
    I wonder if your best plan might be to rent good gear instead? Live to play another day.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Richardson View Post
    Pretty much use it then trash it... hope it's not trashed while using it.

    The Saturn motto is to "get you on the water." While their real goal has been to make an entry-level, affordable inflatable... they should add, getting you 'in' the water if used in more demanding waters, dragging shallows, or piling up wilderness mileage day-in day out with loads.

    To put things in perspective, the 'Rafts' are Kenai weekenders, not really up to wilderness Alaska rigors of daily/weekly turnaround commercial use. I see this is not necessarily your plan, and that you referenced up to class II... yet keep in mind, freighting loads through the shallows will up damage probability in short order --- more-so than most boaters know (particularly the .9mm S. Korean fabric and China Assembled .9mm PVC).

    On to the good news...
    The boat you described is inexpensive, like $260 landed in Anchorage direct from China manufacturer for me - if I ever wanted one and even made to my specifications. Boat retails for around double that 'without' the Saturn Patch on the side. When you buy direct from Saturn it's doubled (like $550) plus you pay shipping from Saturn in Idaho I believe. A few Alaska vendors will call it 'Alaska proof' and triple or quadruple the asking price (to 'er off to blame shipping or claim some exclusive)... but truthfully, they are mostly the same thing from same/similar 'overseas' copies/outsourcing.

    Couple good things about purchasing these kinds of boats:
    --- Gets you out on the water
    --- Trying stuff out and having fun exploring the paddle-sports
    --- Seeing if you and others with you enjoy rafting, canoeing, and kayaking
    --- Without much investment.

    Flip-side is that you get sub-standard less-dependable equipment, cheap components/accessories, and don't make a fair shake floating the compromise inflatables. I'll add that the best way to go when using this .9 mm PVC material is to keep it small with less momentum (more canoe/kayak type with lighter weight in boat) and maintain 'er 'thoroughly clean' to routinely investigate damages, seam leaks, etc.

    Boat described will likely be fine for 3-5 years on easy water by novice to intermediate boaters, provided not lots of dragging in the shallows, being attentive to good on-water entry and exit, plus the thorough up-keep. The accessories are not to be depended on water or even around the house --- they are total play toys at best.

    Consider one-man performance to be better using frame or saddled stands and good set of oars with a spare - this will cost more and should not go cheap. Boat described is tipsy in a hurry... therefore stability-wise look to a quality, sturdy canoe/raft paddle or a long convertible kayak paddle for recovery strokes. You'll need a much better pump and more complete repair kit. My last advice, dress for conditions (maybe a dry-suit if paddling the late fall) and never skimp an a good Life Jacket.
    Thanks for the great info.Thought it might be ok for the once a year drift or for flyin getting across lakes ect.Looks like the Soar version would be a better/reliable craft.

  7. #7
    New member akhunter02's Avatar
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    Either the Pro Pioneer or it's counter part, (not sure of its name) sold by Brian Richards is the way to go. I have the Pro Pioneer, my hunting partner has the one you can purchase from Brian. Both worked extreemly well on this past years float hunt for moose. Pro's on Brian's raft/canoe: It carries its width from bow to stern, center of gravity is a bit lower. Con's, not very comfortable for someone with long legs. The Pro Pioneer sits a bit higher in the water which i like for my long legs, the depth of the conoe from top of tubes to the floor is a bit deeper which makes it great for suspending meat. Both draft very little water, are easy to pack, Cant go wrong with either one.

    I used my Pro Pioneer on two hunts last year, float for boo and one for moose. On the boo hunt there were two of us, all our gear and 3 boo, you would never have know we had that much weight. The moose hunt we both put a whole moose and our gear in each our conoes, once again a perfect boat for float hunting. Pick one and go with it

  8. #8

    Default

    Check out the "SOTAR" Brooks range Canoe/raft , urethane welded, at the" great alaska sportsman show" New design that I am sure you will be impressed with, especially if a kicker would be of interest to you."

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