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Thread: 8'6" vs 9'0" Beam?

  1. #1

    Default 8'6" vs 9'0" Beam?

    Am having a 26' Glacier Craft built and trying to decide between
    an 8'6" or 9'0" beam. Will be trailering the boat a lot but like the idea of wider deck and more stability on the water. I'm relatively new to salt water boating and would appreciate all feedback on this.

  2. #2
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm not up on the oversize vehicle requirements, but 9' will put you right at the limit for width which may then require an oversize permit and "oversise" sign front and rear every time you want to trailer it. It might not be worth the pain of getting a permit every time if required.
    AKmud
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    Mud is correct, probably not worth the hassle. I am curious though, how much do you think your boat and trailer combo will weigh full of fuel and water?
    Tennessee

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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Default beam

    416,

    I have a friend that has that exact boat. His was the last hull that was actually built down in Washington, then finished up here. His is 8'6" and he loves it. It is set up with a salon and galley, with the head in the v-berth. I believe that he has the extended cabin, too, but I am not 100% certain. He started with F115's and had one stolen out of his driveway. He repowered with F150's and is really pleased. He burns about the same at cruise due to the fact that the engines are not working as hard.

    I have a 29x10 currently under construction. I have been thoroughly impressed with the craftmanship and construction of these hulls. Jason is one heck of a welder and the rest of the crew really prides themselves in turning out a superior product. I CANNOT WAIT TO CHRISTEN THIS BOAT!

    Congrats on the purchase!

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    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    Red face

    Bigger is always better (except for electronics and asses)!

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    Default 9'

    Getting the proper permits is not much of a hassle, I am pretty sure that you can get a permit that is good for all summer long, so you would just have to get it once a year. Not that I am saying that this is ok, but there are many people that tow boats with a 9' beam that have no permits and have no problems. 9' is wide but on your trailer going down the road it's not really that obvious.

  7. #7
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    $24 for 3 day permit ( think $48 for month) and limited on days you can tow....no sundays no holidays and not longer than 30 min after sunset or before sunrise. some times not after noon on fri or sat. ...... not worth the trouble if you tow much. when my 10 wide sells ( see add here " 5 boats for sale")i will be getting an 8-1/2 wide.
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
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  8. #8

    Default

    Thanks for all the input. I may go 8'6" now, dont want to be hasseled on times and days I can tow. Also was considering twin 115's but the 150's sound like the right combo. These boats are heavy at over 7,000 lb dry.
    This sight is great for all the info. How did we get by in the "old days" ?

  9. #9
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The narrower boat should be more fuel efficient.

    I'd definately go twin 150's.

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    Default Motor Option

    It may not be a bad idea to get twin 175 or 225 for a boat that is 7000lb dry. I think it would be under-powered especially when you load it down with gear and fuel. Actual use weight is probably closer to 9000 lbs. There is a formula for this calculation somewhere on this forum. The engine is something you want to be sure of.

  11. #11

    Default Width ???

    I am having a 27 ft being built and am debating on making it 9.5 ft wide. I looked into the permitting requirements and you can get a monthly permit for $50 per month. You can get the permit by the month, 3 mo, 6 mo, or longer. You get a month free if you get the 6 mo permit at $250. That would carry you from April thru September. With an extended permit you can move the boat at will without notifying anyone.

    There are some blackout dates around Memorial day, the 4th and Labor Day. You are also supposed to not drive through town during the rush hours. This stuff is all on the permit. You can also tow at night with the proper lighting.

    You can get on Myalaska (same place you do your permenant fund app) and run through the permit process, except for paying for it, and see what its like. I wouldn't even worry about it at 9ft.

    Denny
    What-a-Day
    27' x 9.5' Glacier Craft - Volvo 300hp D4 Diesel
    Remember: Any fool can be uncomfortable.
    Denny

  12. #12

    Default Paul's formula

    To quote Paul H..... "Just remember that you should keep your engine loading to 25#/hp ideal, and 40#/hp max. Hence 230 hp would be good for a gross weight (hull, engines, fuel, crew, gear, everything) of 5750# ideal and 9200# max. With the max loading the engines will really be working to get you up on step, and will be pretty much WOT at cruising speed. At ideal loading you pop right up on step, and can cruise at ~2/3 throttle ie ~4k rpm where you get your best mileage."


    So, if the boats ideal weight is 7000 pounds, minimum horse would be 280..... I think, I was never great at math.

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    Default

    I would also carefully explore what trailer they are offering you. Highly suggest disc brakes on all axles and go with electric operation over the manual surge style. In the last couple of years I have personally seen three different rigs with surge disc brakes that caught on fire coming off Turnigan Pass.
    Most boat manufactors under estimate the weight of what they are selling. If your boat weighs 7,000 pounds dry once you add all the batteries, water, fuel, gear etc, and the weight of the trailer you will probably easily hit 11,000 pounds and maybe 12,000 worth of towed weight.
    You are not going to be able to tow and stop something like this with a 1/2 ton or lightweight 3/4 ton pickup.
    Tennessee

  14. #14

    Default

    Great information. The trailer is a triple axle but not sure if the brakes are surge or electrical. Will be towing it with a 2006 F-250 Power Stroke diesel. This truck is equipped with the new trailer braking system so electtrical brakes would be the way to go. Thanks to all for the help.

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    Find out if the brakes are disc or drums. Disc surge brakes are the ones with the potential for overheating. Drum brakes are weak for a trailer carrying that much weight.
    Tennessee

  16. #16

    Default

    There is no reason to not go with the 9' beam, you will never regret it.
    The extra 6" will really show up in the cabin, hallway width etc, it is like adding 2 ft to the length.
    My lifetimer is 9' and I'm going 9'6" on the next one .
    My boat is 27 LOA and about 9500lbs loaded and the twin 150 Honda's push it at about 45 mph , I definitely would go minimum, twin 150's on your boat.
    Do yourself a favor and build your boat with the wider beam!!!!
    Ken

  17. #17

    Default Breaks

    They are surge drum brakes on all three axles. They also come with a fresh water flush system for the axles and brakes. They are bunk trailers by King.

    The one that comes with the 26 and 27 is the KBT 8600 which has a load capacity of 8600lbs. I think that I will have it upgraded to the KBT10500 which has a load capacity of 10,500lbs and is made for the same length boats. It comes with larger tires and I assume additional breaking capacity. I learned a long time ago that having a little extra trailer can save you a lot of problems down the road.

    I believe your 26 should be about 5500lbs dry with motors. You can add at least 2000lbs for an extended trip. I am setting up mine so that everything, including the refrigerator can be removed for day trips. Mine will have a Volvo D4 260 diesel with a honda 20hp kicker which weighs more, however, there is less structure on the boat that is not needed to support the outboards and I think it will conpensate.
    What-a-Day
    27' x 9.5' Glacier Craft - Volvo 300hp D4 Diesel
    Remember: Any fool can be uncomfortable.
    Denny

  18. #18
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    On my triple axle King trailer it only cost me $59 an axle to upgrade to disc's. I would highly recommend it. Discs can grab when wet. Remember you will be backing this down the ramp till all wheels are underwater.
    Tennessee

  19. #19

    Default Beam width

    My 26' Hewescraft Ak Searunner has a 8'6 beam. If I was rich I would have a wider beam and a bigger boat. My boat is 3,600 lbs. dry. The 2 four stroke Yamaha 115's are ok for the weight. The 150's are would be more ok. If your boat is 7,000 lbs. dry I would go bigger then the 150's. Under powered boats suck. My fuel tank is 156 gallons. I wish it was 200 or more gallons. Get a great BIG FUEL TANK. Google The Hull Truth. Lots of good boat info there.

  20. #20

    Default

    Back to the width issue, I would definitely go with a wider beam the extra room and not to mention the extra stability is well worth the pain of getting a permit. I try and leave the my boat parked in storage at whatever port that I will be using Whittier, Seward etc. especially the big holidays when the permit has you restricted. That extra foot or so is really appreciated when you’re standing back there with 3 or 4 friends all day hauling in butts. Just make sure you keep it under 10' (no pilot cars)

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