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Thread: DIY Install a Timney Trigger, or Not ??

  1. #1
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Default DIY Install a Timney Trigger, or Not ??

    So, I'm working with a Ruger Model 77 MK II, 30-06, It has the most funky trigger I've ever pulled,

    looking at Timneys online, it looks like they are intended to be installed by the buyer at home (?)
    It's intimidating as all get out, to me, with stuff I've read, "filing a little here, maybe redrilling something there," etc.
    But there seems to be nobody in town Kodiak currently Gunsmithing,
    the guys at Macks said, "they'll send 'em out for Trigger work,"

    So have you guys done this, it's really easy, or not ??

    I'm a fairly competent mechanic, just spooked by the importance of the Trigger Safety, etc. Plus it's not my rifle, can't screw around,
    unless it's really just a drop in, then I gotta do it. Sounds like a dream solution for this rifle.
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    I know it's not what your looking for, but good reading on the ruger trigger.
    I did it to one of mine and it came out nice.

    http://www.centerfirecentral.com/77trigger.html

    As for as a Timney in a mkII, I'm not a pro but I put one in. Pretty easy. If you need to adjust the safety go slow.
    You'll probably have to inlet the stock a little also.

    I'd work on the factory trigger, if you mess it up you could then go with a Timney or other aftermarket trigger.
    "The older I get, the better I was."

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    Don't let it spook you. I put one in my Ruger 77 MKII at home with minmal effort. As I recall, the only thing I had to do was file some metal off of the 3 position safety to get it to work. The instructions that came with the Timney gave very good specific instructions on how to do it (where to file, only on one side of the safety and it was a large flat area). I just filed slow and kept trying until the safety would engage. It was very easy and I have just average (shade tree mechanic abilities). It will sure give you a nice adjustible trigger when you are done. Mine was well worth the money! You can have it in and back together in an hour or 2.

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    I've installed a couple dozen of the Timney MkII triggers. As mentioned, go slow when fitting the safety pad on the trigger itself. Make sure the rifle is cocked, then use a scribe to mark the level from the safety shaft onto the dyed portion of the safety engagement pad on the trigger. Once you are close, then you will probably take the trigger in and out of the rifle several times taking just a few strokes at a time with a fine file. When fitted up, the trigger should not move when pressure is applied with the safety engaged. Again, always make sure the rifle is cocked when checking fit. Use the spring that is in the rifle from Ruger, it'll provide a nice, clean 2 3/4 lb pull. The light spring that comes with the Timney sets up about a 1 1/2 lb pull. A little light for most uses. Just my opinion.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Plus it's not my rifle,

    You really want to expose yourself to liability for someone elses actions?

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    Good point Wild! I read that post and never even seen the part about "not my rifle"? Maybe it is a long term borrowed rifle he will be hunting with?

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    I have installed a Timney on my Hawkeye, not a tough job at all. Go slow and follow the directions.

    I did recently remove it and installed a Rifle Basix trigger. Personally I think it's a better design and it utilizes the Ruger sear. It is externally adjustable so after the install you can tweak the pull with a hex wrench in seconds without removing the stock.

    http://www.riflebasix.com/index.php?...roducts_id=205

    The reason for the swap was the Timney was giving me an unexpected firing when I closed the bolt. I know it's because I had it set a touch light. The Timney set up has a hex screw on the sear that comes factory set. I had to readjust it and glue with loc-tight so it wouldn't go off unexpectedly. I didn't mind it at the range but didn't trust it on a hunt.

    I really like the fit and feel of the Basix. I've adjusted it down to less than 1 pound for testing with several hard bolt closures and butt slams with no unexpected fires. In the end I readjusted it to 2.5 which is were I like my hunting trigger.

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    Just to clarify my post I think Timney makes a fine trigger. However with my particular rifle and desired settings the Rifle Basix trigger preforms better for me.

    By the way, the Basix trigger can be fit after the safety was modified to accommodate the Timney. The safety adjustment on the Basix uses a cam screw and the lobe is turned until it contacts the safety pad on the Ruger's safety lever, very simple.

    I have used Timneys in other brands of rifles with no problems. I have not used a Rifle Basix in any other rifle prior to my Hawkeye.

    Cheers,

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Thanks guys,
    Wild, on the liability thought, it's my Father in Laws rifle, we're pretty close, heh heh
    We're not Lawsuit kind of people, I would certainly ask him first,..........and on and on and on

    I'm just reloading for him so need to use the rifle at the range for a while, won't be hunting with it,
    He has already asked me to help him figure out why it was not sighting in very well originally, so in the process he knows I'm the type to ask questions like this here, to make sure I'm doing it right.
    we do a lot of things "in house" in this family, so,

    tho I appreciate the concern, I imagine it would be very real in most instances, it doesn't really apply here
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    I imagine it would be very real in most instances, it doesn't really apply here

    No? How about to the third party who may be injured in an incident with your father?

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Ok, that's a good point. That is probably what I was looking for in the original question,

    "Is this something intended for the GunOwner to do himself?" It sure looks that way from the online sources for purchasing these.

    Isn't that similar to doing your own brake work on your cars, tho, at what point does liability lock up our ability to repair stuff?
    I was wondering if this was a job that could safely be considered and completed by a DIY person ???

    I'm a commercial fisherman who still lives in the world of Do it all yourself, cause you have to. Can't bring it to the shipyard or Diesel Shop for everything. I suppose Gun Maintenance is a bit different.
    Is this a current thing you guys see in your business? Lawsuits traced back to the guy who put that trigger in ? How often ?

    If I had an option on island to have this checked out, I would not even consider it myself, I guess anyway.
    I wonder what it would cost to send it to Anch to have the trigger repaired/replaced.
    Even this, should I consider calling Ruger on the deal? It's a couple years old, but less than 200 rounds down barrel.
    Any experiences with that, anyone?

    Point taken tho, thanks
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Usually the Timney trigger will cost 90 to 110 for the parts. Labor, depending on who's charging will run around 30 to 60. Most folks who know what they are doing can get this done nicely in about 30 minutes. If you can be careful and methodical with a file, keep surfaces level and square, have a feel and an eye for fit of close tolerances, then you can perhaps do this on the first try. Everyone had to do it the first time once.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Kodiak, I think you could probably do this yourself (IMHO). I know I installed mine and just followed the instructions. Would have taken it to a smith, but:
    1. I had read many posts and articles that said the stock Ruger MK II trigger, (not Hawkeye) could not be improved much, even by gunsmiths and it was better to replace with Timney, Rifle Basics, ect.. (not sure this is gospel, but I have read it several places)
    2. Much like you, I have just come up from the school of hard knocks and have always done any repairs to house, vehicles, or toys myself. I would have gladly paid to have much of this done professionally, but most often than not could not afford to.
    3. Like you have read, the Timney site advertises this is a product that an average do it yourself person can install safely. I think if you install it carefully following instructions, it will work fine if not adjusted down too light. I think mine is set at about 3-3 1/4 lbs if I remember right. For my limited experience, I like a trigger of about 3 to 3.5 lbs on a hunting rifle.

    I'm sure Wild or many of the more experienced guys on here can give feedback if I am wrong on any of this. It could be possible to have it shipped and done professionally for a little more than what the Timney will cost??? I think the MK II stock non-adjustible trigger was a lawyer inspired revision of the adjustible trigger on the MK I models. The new Hawkeye trigger is supposed to be much better.

    As far as liability goes, I'm sure a valid point could be made, but one could also find liability issues (in the case of a tragic event) for modifying a factory trigger in the first place wether you do the work or pay to have it done in my opinion. Sue happy lawyers could make a liability issue over just about anything!

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    Perhpas it is just me but $100 - $150 or more to get a decent trigger pull on a relatively inexpensive rifle seems kinda steep! If the trigger is that bad on Rugers I'd look be looking for another gun unless I could do the work on the stock trigger myself.

    I've got a couple of Ruger 77s but really don't shoot them much. I don't recall the triggers as being that bad and I'm pretty touchy about my triggers. I would suspect you could take a factory trigger down and carefully and slowly smooth everything up, make sure nothing is binding and the pivot pins are good, and have a safe useable trigger without spending anything except your time.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
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