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Thread: Ever have a bad day in flight training

  1. #1
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    Default Ever have a bad day in flight training

    Im currently 2/3rd's done with my instrument rating and had to switch instructors(old instructor going to fly with Penn Air on Monday). So the chief flight instructor says he would finish me up, and today we went out flying and I think had a bad day. The attitude indicator was going bad, effecting my headings and holding patterns until i realized it, he had a totally different approach to tracking and probably my worse landing in the last 400. One of those days that makes me wonder why, I keep doing it. I know why, and tommorow is another day. Walked away, no harm no damage, and now that I think about it just another great day to be alive, and I will try again tommorow.

    Terry

  2. #2
    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Default no worries

    Happens to everyone. I doubt it will be your last either. You just have a bad day sometimes. Remember to have fun. Good Luck

  3. #3
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    Default Today was better

    Today was much much better, but was doing holding patterns at 2500 at big lake and came within 20 feet of being hit by another aircraft. Funny how anchorage had us both on radar and let us know 30 seconds after.

    Terry

  4. #4

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    Unfortunately traffic advisories for vfr aircraft are on a time permitting basis at A11 in the class C. If they are busy its better to keep your head out the window!!

  5. #5
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    Default see and avoid..

    is the magic rule, especially if all involved are VFR. Holding over VOR's in VFR conditions is pretty risky, and Big Lake being so close to training airports makes it a very popular navaid for practice approaches, holding, and tracking. Try holding at an intersection on your enroute chart. Or better yet, make up your own with radials crossing bearings..you can escape the crowds! And just because approach is providing you with some "flight following", just remember their priority is separation of IFR traffic. Im assuming you were VFR.

  6. #6
    Member DanC's Avatar
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    Default You might care about it too much...

    When I was doing my instrument training I overheard an instructor counsel a very discouraged student who was considering quitting the program (a comprehensive flight training program at a major university). The instructor told the student to develop an attitude that he "does not care" whenever he was getting stressed. I thought that was very strange advice but decided to try it myself the next time I was in IMC. Strangely, it worked! Instead of fighting the controls in turbulence, I relaxed and let the trim of the airplane do the work. I learned to add just a little back pressure or power in turns and found that the airplane would easily fly itself as if it were on rails if I only relaxed and let the plane do its job. That put me in better control of the IFR procedures and ultimately, I am sure, made me a better instrument pilot.

    Nowadays I try to avoid IMC every chance I get for I have learned that Alaskan clouds frequently have a granite core and clouds in the plains are loaded with elevator shafts. But I maintain instrument currency and know that I am in control of the airplane.

    Keep at it and you will learn that instrument competency is the best skill you can have when flying.

    Good luck,
    Dan

  7. #7
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    Smile bad days happen

    Been flying airplanes for 20 yrs, I'm 34 now, and fly the big iron to pay the bills to fly the small fun stuff. Bad days happen, plain and simple. 1. know your limits, and if it gets to be a REALLLY bad day, park it!!!! I've got 2500+ hrs of CFIIing and have seen many students have bad days...no big deal. I probably have a bad day (in my opinion) about every 6 months, I actually consider it an attitude check. I probably over analyze it, but i figure out what went wrong where, and try to make sure it doesn't happen again. Keep going, you'll be glad you did, AK is a great place to fly!! If you ever need a safty pilot, I'm still CFII current, give me a call or email me AKBLOOM@aol.com

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