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Thread: What is the proper way of draining the coolant in a Widetrak LX?

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Default What is the proper way of draining the coolant in a Widetrak LX?

    I've never replaced the coolant in my machine (it's 10 yrs old) and figured it's time to drain it, but for the life of me.......I can't figure out how to properly drain it. It's a bit embarrassing considering I just completely rebuilt the entire rear suspesnion (all shocks, springs, bearings and hifax), driven shaft, and jack shaft bearings........but I can't even figure out a simple task like draining coolant.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Is that a 500 engine? If so, we have several in our family. There is no drain on them anywhere. You just pull the upper hose and the return hose from the heat exchangers and let it dump on the shop floor. You can then use a small amount of compressed air to carefully push the coolant all out of the various heat exchangers and the engine. You can also lift up the rear of the sled and let gravity do the work. It's tough to get it all out.

    In reality, I have never changed anti-freeze in any sled I have ever owned. I just test it yearly to make sure it gives me the level of protection I need. I have a '98 Summit X that still tests fine with a coolant tester down to -50F. It has had many things done to it that require removing parts of the cooling system and once I am done I just top off the coolant and move on.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Thanks Doug, that's what I figured as I searched high and low for a reasonable and non-messy way to drain the coolant. I'm going to pull the hoses and hook a shop vac to the main lines and areas going into the motor, instead of making a big goofy mess. I did this once on a vehicle with a broken petcok (drain plug). My shop vac has connectors small enough that will slip into the hose itself. I'll let yah know how it went. I'm switching to a royal puple coolant that I got for free from a buddy who was moving and couldn't ship it. If I don't use it, it'll get thrown away. Maybe Royal Puple will run cooler than the old junk.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Shop Vacs work fine but it's good to clean them out with water afterwards because it can gum things up if you want to use the vac for something else later. I use the shop vac to suck out the coolant from the lower end of the engine when I am rebuilding them. Our local ArcticCat shop has a dedicated shop vac to remove coolant so they can just put it back in the machine if they have to.

    Royal Purple makes good stuff. I have no clue how they can improve on coolant technology, but who knows. If it's free it sounds great. The coolant I use in my semi is approved for 500,000 miles. That's right at 15,000 hours of use in my truck.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member tjm's Avatar
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    you can pick up a suction device made just for tasks like this...like a bicycle pump only the cylinder is larger...nice small diameter hose to stick inside the coolant hose and pump away sucking it out...makes it very nice to get the coolant out before tearing down the motor and not get coolant all over....

    either that or, like Doug said, drop some sorbent and let 'er run on the floor....either way works...
    ------------------------------------------------
    pull my finger....

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