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Thread: New Fox Pro

  1. #1
    Member mlwent's Avatar
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    Default New Fox Pro

    Took out the new foxpro today, no luck on any ground critters coming in but had a couple hawks, an owl and a bunch of ravens. Wondering how long people stay on a set up before you call it a bust? It was pretty cold today and couldn't stay more than an hour before heading to the truck to warm up.

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    Member sniper3083006's Avatar
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    Sounds to me you were going about it correctly. Might have just needed to sit a little longer. I hear tell if you get the feathers it shouldn't be long fore the fur comes in.

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    Member sniper3083006's Avatar
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    Which fox pro do you have anyhow?

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    snowcamoman on here seems to have a pretty solid success rate, and he says that he only stays on stand 15 minutes before moving on. I've heard others say that they stay 45 minutes if targeting lynx, but when it's this cold, it seems to make sense to make shorter stands so that you can warm up while moving between stands.

  5. #5

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    I'm on stand 15 minutes and then high tailing it to the next spot. Got a nice lynx Saturday after about 4 minutes of snowshoe playing and then last night got a coyote after 10 minutes. If I see something coming in, I'll run over 15 minutes, but not usually. An hour is a long time to hold up on one stand. I play the numbers game and try to get in as many stands in decent spots as possible. If you're calling birds, you're doing it right, probably not any predators in the area though.

  6. #6
    Member mlwent's Avatar
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    I bought the spitfire. I need my kidneys, arms/legs so can't afford the way cool ones.

  7. #7

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    I'm on stand 15 minutes and then high tailing it to the next spot. Got a nice lynx Saturday after about 4 minutes of snowshoe playing and then last night got a coyote after 10 minutes. If I see something coming in, I'll run over 15 minutes, but not usually. An hour is a long time to hold up on one stand. I play the numbers game and try to get in as many stands in decent spots as possible. If you're calling birds, you're doing it right, probably not any predators in the area though.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by snowcamoman View Post
    If you're calling birds, you're doing it right, probably not any predators in the area though.
    Hey, Snowcamoman. I think you just answered a question I had in your last sentence. I made a couple sets yesterday in an area with lots of snowshoe hare. Probably kicked up a half a dozen hares while out walking to my stand, as well as an immature goshawk. While I was set up, I called in a few goshawks. On my way out, I found a couple dead hares along the trail where a goshawk flew down and killed the hare. I knew it was a hawk and not a lynx, fox, or coyote because you could see the marks left by the wings in the snow. On my way up to my stand I only found one very old set of tracks that I suspected as being lynx although they were indistinguishable and blown over with snow. My question to you is this. When Goshawks take over an area, even though there are plenty of prey species available, do the hawks outcompete the fur bearing predators? That is, is this a good indication that the fur bearing predators moved on to a new area? Thanks for answering my question in advance. Bushwhack

  9. #9

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    Bushwack Jack,
    I'm not an expert on birds of prey or predator behavior, but I'll take a guess and tell you how I'd approach it. If there's good cover and brush for a lynx, fox, or coyote to use for catching hares, I'd call it. I'd try to find a small pocket where you have some sort of view to setup your caller and make them expose themself. I think that the Goshawks and predators would stick in the same area as long as there is sufficient food and nearby cover for resting. I wouldn't necessarily say that hawks out-compete fur bearing predators, but they surely have the "eye in the sky" advantage and the predators can use that to their own advantage and take the easy meal a hawk has just killed, dropped, or is working on eating. Other than getting out after a fresh snow (or setting up a game-cam) to check for fresh tracks, it's tough to know if predators are specifically using an area within a recent amount of time. I'm not the world's best tracker or track reader, but after a fresh snow, I know the predator has been there recently and is probably fairly close by. I hope that helps a bit.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by snowcamoman View Post
    Bushwack Jack,
    I'm not an expert on birds of prey or predator behavior, but I'll take a guess and tell you how I'd approach it. If there's good cover and brush for a lynx, fox, or coyote to use for catching hares, I'd call it. I'd try to find a small pocket where you have some sort of view to setup your caller and make them expose themself. I think that the Goshawks and predators would stick in the same area as long as there is sufficient food and nearby cover for resting. I wouldn't necessarily say that hawks out-compete fur bearing predators, but they surely have the "eye in the sky" advantage and the predators can use that to their own advantage and take the easy meal a hawk has just killed, dropped, or is working on eating. Other than getting out after a fresh snow (or setting up a game-cam) to check for fresh tracks, it's tough to know if predators are specifically using an area within a recent amount of time. I'm not the world's best tracker or track reader, but after a fresh snow, I know the predator has been there recently and is probably fairly close by. I hope that helps a bit.
    It does. Thanks for the tip.

  11. #11
    Member mlwent's Avatar
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    I don't know about calling fur but if I had a dollar for all the birds I called in the last three trips out I could pay for this Fox Pro.

  12. #12
    Member sniper3083006's Avatar
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    If'n you dont score on the next trip or two you could either....
    1. Send the unit back to the company as defective....or......
    2. Sell it to me
    Just kidding keep at it your luck will have to change sooner or later. And when it does remember everything you did that day to be successful and try it again.

  13. #13
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I am just curious but have you made a set and gone to check and see if perhaps you got busted? Obviously if you are planning on hunting an area again the it would suck to educate the animals but perhaps it would be worth while to go out on a fresh snow day and make some sets for perhaps 1/2 hour and then go and inspect the area to see if perhaps you got caught and missed an opportunity. Perhaps it isn't a location problem but rather a presentation issue. Guys like snowcamoman seem to be tacticians in the way they set up which no doubt is reflected in their success.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by mlwent View Post
    I don't know about calling fur but if I had a dollar for all the birds I called in the last three trips out I could pay for this Fox Pro.
    That's funny. Sounds like you and I are having similar results. I got patience. I believe we will connect one of these days. I am getting the impression it is just a matter of whether or not there just happens to be a predator close by, and whether or not they are hungry enough for a meal, and whether or not they have already heard an electronic caller before. If you are lucky enough to get all three scenarios in your favor you will score.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I am just curious but have you made a set and gone to check and see if perhaps you got busted? Obviously if you are planning on hunting an area again the it would suck to educate the animals but perhaps it would be worth while to go out on a fresh snow day and make some sets for perhaps 1/2 hour and then go and inspect the area to see if perhaps you got caught and missed an opportunity. Perhaps it isn't a location problem but rather a presentation issue. Guys like snowcamoman seem to be tacticians in the way they set up which no doubt is reflected in their success.
    True. Valid points. I was really itching to get out yesterday with the fresh snowfall we got, but my kids were begging me to play out in the snow with them. A few more years and they will be ready to go hunting with me.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by sniper3083006 View Post
    If'n you dont score on the next trip or two you could either....
    1. Send the unit back to the company as defective....or......
    2. Sell it to me
    Just kidding keep at it your luck will have to change sooner or later. And when it does remember everything you did that day to be successful and try it again.
    No, I think keep my call thank you.

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