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Thread: "BC" - "Before Cabela's"

  1. #1

    Cool "BC" - "Before Cabela's"

    Great story posted by "tustumena_lake", in the "Andy Simon thread", regarding a hunt on the Kenai Peninsula early in the last century. A truly fascinating account not only of the hunt but the hunting conditions. Even more fascinating and amazing considering it was done long before Cabela's or gore-tex or electric fences for keeping bears away!
    Amazing how our definition of "hard" changes over time.
    Joe

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    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    Great story posted by "tustumena_lake" regarding a hunt on the Kenai Peninsula early in the last century. A truly fascinating account not only of the hunt but the hunting conditions. Even more fascinating and amazing considering it was done long before Cabela's or gore-tex or electric fences for keeping bears away!
    Amazing how our definition of "hard" changes over time.
    Joe
    Kind of makes you wonder how ANYTHING got done outdoors in winter BC, doesn't it.
    Must have been 30-40 degrees warmer during hunting & trapping seasons 100-200 years ago.

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    "BA" - Before Aircraft.

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    Judging by my hunting books, you were around "BC", Joe.

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    I have a lot of books written in the 1870 to 1940 period. And none equal "Born on Snowshoes" for tough. She may have been the toughest human that ever walked the north.

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    Lotta my neighbors, especially 50 + grew up walking behind the dog sled, as most used dogs untill the 70's/80's when snowgos took over.

    The Father inlaw used to mush up the Brooks Range and down to the mouth of the Coville River ofnthe "Road North" an ancient trail on his Arctic Fox and Polar Bear hunting days.

    Too bad those most all of them Old timers couldnt read/write and leave us with first hand accounts.......

    Nobody I can think of can even flick a bic to how those old folks Hunted.......
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    It is all truly being lost.Now days hard times is haveing to get up to get your coffee at the office.How many times here do we hear if it makes it easier why not use it. Up to about fifty I could run like the wind,now I have the runs and break wind and out to pasture
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland
    Nobody I can think of can even flick a bic to how those old folks Hunted...
    And therein lies the truth. Nicely said.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Bushrat your life gets real close and if the gen quit well there you have it
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Member germe1967's Avatar
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    Ok, so we have a few more conveniences. But I remember as a little boy living up off the Steese Highway that almost all our neigbors didn't bother going on long hunts, (when meat hunting). They just went out back a few hundred yards from the place and called. Back then you couldn't drive to town without dodging the cows in the road. So there are more high tech gadgets to keep us safe, warm, and comfy in camp, but we have to go further, later, and colder to get a freezer full of meat.

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    Interesting point germe. What's worse to fight, crowds or isolation. As per usual, I think it depends on temperment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post
    "... Nobody I can think of can even flick a bic to how those old folks Hunted.......
    Those "...old folks..." would be those "...especially 50 +..."? Just curious. I believe, or at least would like to, that there are still a fair number of people that still understand that the snow machine, (or mules) just get a person to a different point to hunt from and are not a substitute for hunting principles used for probably thousands of years before we or our "gore-tex" and snow machines started gracing the mountain sides and river vallies.
    Joe

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    If you don't wear wool, traverse with mule, dog team or on wood and babiche, and shoot with walnut and blued you're a greenhorn pansy*****.








    Just kidding.

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    One of the best wow moments is to go to independance mine and see that prospectors were there in 1901. These guys must have started in Seward how the heck would you find your way to Hatchers pass PA (pre airplane) if you were not a local.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

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    My grandpa's buddy had a Swamp buggy in the early 50's. Took 'em 2 full days to drive it from Anch to Paxon. Once off-road, A couple guys would ride, and the others just carried their Rifles and walked the 20 miles to moose Camp. It was a yearly trip. Wimps! Ha ha

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    I can apprecitate and acknowledge how different and difficult is was for those who have gone before us were. Does it make it the experiences that we have "nowadays" any less significant or meaningfull? No.....not if my book.

    I love reading about the early days in Alaska and dream of what it was like. Would have been nice to experience that but this is what I have and I will enjoy it to its fullest. I'm sure when I've had my day and sit and talk to the boys about their hunting experiences, they will never be as good as those wonderful days that have passed me by......

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    Well said.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Finley View Post
    I can apprecitate and acknowledge how different and difficult is was for those who have gone before us were. Does it make it the experiences that we have "nowadays" any less significant or meaningfull? No.....not if my book.
    It just seems that the technology advances, the less effort most are willing to put forth to secure an animal. If the effort expended by hunters today was even close to that of even 50 years ago a lot of these management "problems" would either "go away" or, at least be far less severe. "...any less significant or meaningfull?...", if so, only because of the success rate and not the technology.
    Appreciate your postings.
    Joe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    Bushrat your life gets real close and if the gen quit well there you have it
    +1 Bushrat is clearly living in the old way, and that should be awesomely respected.

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    Member NDTerminator's Avatar
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    Two of my late uncles (one of which mentored me in the outdoors and put the Alaska bug in my ear whern I was a kid) went up there to mine gold when they got back from WWII. I have ab old photo album of pics they took on this adventure. They only came back because my grandfather was sick on his deathbed, and in those days sons were expected to drop what they were doing and come home to lead the family when the patriarch died. This they did, and never went back. I know Lenny missed Alasaka right up until he died. He kept a painting of a brown bear over the bed we boys slept in when we were visiting...

    I pull those Alaska albums out now & then and let me tell you, those guys were living a mighty bushy existence in the mid-late 40's up there! Looks like wool shirts & canvas dungaree pants were the dress code.

    My dad got assigned to an AA Crew on Kodiak Island and was there for 4 years, until the end of the war. He hated Alaskla, never wanted to go back, and discouraged us boys from thinking about it. He too took pictures and made up an album that I nearly wore out. Compared to their army life up there, my 3 years at Ft. Riley (which included a REFORGER in 79') was like a penthouse at the Ritz.

    One of my earliest memories was after sufficient begging, Dad taking that album down (kind of buckskin leather with a totem pole ebossed on it) and showing it to us while we sat in his lap. THere was one picture of an obviously huge bear that was shot in the dump He said they killed it with Garands. They hoisted it up on it's back legs & propped up with a thick board, and it was just flippin' huge!

    If anyone is interested I could see about scanning some in & sharing them.

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