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Thread: How many of you video your hunts?

  1. #1
    Member dwhunter's Avatar
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    Default How many of you video your hunts?

    I started doing this years ago and have got a very nice collection from some great hunting and fishing trips, these are things along with my photo albums etc my grandkids can watch if they feel so inclined. My family and buddies also like to watch them when I get back from a trip unless they are watching just to be nice, remember the slide shows

    Doug

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    I do, however, when handing the camera over to your hunting partner before taking your shot at a sheep, make sure he has his glasses on.
    It's the journey, not the destination.

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    I take it along with me. The video is never that good except over a bait station where everything is still but it is still nice to watch the videos in the winter and drift back to the moment.

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    Smile Would like to this year!

    Glad you brought this up. I have not and this year I would like to. I drew a sheep tag for the TOK unit and would love to have it filmed. It would be nice to have a professional do it but I am sure that would be very costly. Anyone know the cost?

    I have a video camera, but am not very good at using it. Does anyone have any helpful ideas on the best way to get your hunt on video? My home videos really sink. If I can't get a good video of my kids in the living room how would my skills improve in the field. They wouldn't so this is why my video recorder stays home.

    So if anyone knows someone that wants to film two sheep hunters take two monster 40+ sheep in the TOK unit this year please send them my way.

  5. #5
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Default new technology

    We video'd parts of our sheep hunt this last year.

    The new ultra-small credit card sized digital cameras with lengthy video possibilities have revolutionized video for sheep and goat hunters.
    Taking a camera into the high country is light and easy now and the quality is great!

  6. #6

    Default I'd Like To...

    I Would Love To Video My Hunts To Show My Dad Down In Pennsylvania..are There Any Suggestions Anyone Has On Equipment, Stratagy, Or Just Some Experienced Advice??
    ...Jackie Bushman is a TOOL

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    Member dwhunter's Avatar
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    Our cameras are the minidv kind and they are TV production quality, you can get a good one for $5-600 and go up into the thousands for all the bells and whistles. I would stay away from the disc kind unless you want the weight of all the discs and the hassle of continually changing them out, the tapes for the minidv are mimimal in weight and long in length.

    I do not know a lot of the other technical stuff, I am a point and shoot kind of guy.

    Doug

  8. #8

    Default Hunting Videos

    I took my brother on a sheep hunt in 2005. We toted the video camera along with the intent of making a video as a Christmas present for dad. It came out real nice and dad was very pleased. My regular partner and I carried a camera all last season and discovered we have a knack for it. My brother is totally into the computer editing stuff, so we send him our footage and he puts it into a real nice film. We are actually looking into marketing what we have and making plans for filming/marketing future hunts. The idea of someone paying for me to tag along as a videographer is intriguing too.

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    Like others I've never really done it but want to give it a try, hopefully this year.
    But I have a question goes along with Fullcurl's comment about possibly making a comercial video.
    I was told by a guy that claimed to be sure of this, that making a video to sell well you are on Forest Service ground was a commercial undertaking that required a permit from the FS (different permit but same idea as guiding or outfitting).
    Anyone know if that's true?
    I handgun hunt & there are few handgun hunting videos out there so I've thought it might be a fun niche market to break into. Of course I'd probably have to kill something for a change before there would be much interest .... :-)
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  10. #10
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    we have 8-10 moose bow kills on video and probaly 25+black bear. i always have my camera and get lots of footage, just need to take the time to learn the editing portion to make a nice finished product. have done fiarly well ( IMO ) but i need to improve and get program for saving in dvd format not just on cd. smaller camera would be nice but i like the 3ccd quality and have not looked into smaller cameras for that quality.
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
    MASTER BOWHUNTER EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR; MEMBER UNITED BLOOD TRACKERS; POPE & YOUNG MEASURER

  11. #11
    Member dwhunter's Avatar
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    Vance in AK,

    You do in fact have to get a permit to film for commercial purposes, I can get the info for anyone that needs it. We go through it every year when we do our bear hunt in PWS.

    I can make a call and get a copy of the forms.

    Doug

  12. #12
    Member Alasken's Avatar
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    Default Great Topic

    I've been packing a video camera in the field for years. When I had my guiding business I would edit all the footage from hunts every year to have posted on my web site and to give clients who hunted with me. Right now in my spare time I'm going through about 3 hours worth of clips I have on my computer with the intention of making a 90 minute or so dvd.

    The camera I have is a mini dv, which at he time I bought it (7 or 8 years ago) was a top of the line consumer camera. I paid about $1000 for it and could replace it with a similar camera now for under $500.

    At the same time I bought a new computer and professional grade editing software (Apple Final Cut Pro), which I'm still using. I've edited family vacations, fishing trips, etc. and burned to dvd. It's been a hobby of mine, and something I have spent a lot of time doing.

    dwhunter is right about the format of the camera to use, that being mini dv. The tapes record an hour of video. There is however a bit of difference between the consumer and broadcast quality camcorders. Without going into a lot of techno talk, the main difference is the censors the cameras use to record the image. Most consumer cameras use one sensor for all three colors, and the broadcast cameras use one censor for each of the three colors (red, green, and blue).

    Filming while on the hunt does have it's challenges. When getting to a spot to glass I would pull my video camera out of my pack right after my spotting scope and tripod. I have quick detach plates on my spotter and my camcorder so switching between the two on my tripod is fast and easy. I've used a tripod as much as possible, and have had good luck with a monopod too. Getting kill shots on film was always a challenge for me because I was usually either watching the animal through binoculars or my rifle scope.

    I've looked around on the internet a little for people who provide this service and they're charging $300/day plus travel and up to $1000 for post production work.

    Sorry to be so long winded here, but this topic is one of my passions. My dream job would be making a living doing what 's been a hobby of mine for a few years now. I would love to film hunts and edit to dvd for a living.

    new camcorder - $3500
    new computer and software - $4000
    following someone on a hunt in Alaska for a demo tape to put in my portfolio...........priceless!

  13. #13
    Member dwhunter's Avatar
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    Alasken,

    I am with you and I love to do it as well, not sure if I would want to do it full time but I do enjoy it alot, I have a buddy that does all of the production/editing work for me and he has all the right equipment etc, it is just not my cup of tea.

    I am ordering a new Canon XL2 this week to really highten the quality of the video we shoot to make better dvd's for everyone on the trips.

    Another note if you have camera that is capable of using wireless mics and you are able to purchase them they are well worth the money, a couple hundred bucks will get you a decent set.

    Doug

  14. #14
    Member Alasken's Avatar
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    dwhunter,

    Wireless mics are must as far as I'm concerned too.

    The XL2 is an awesome camera. My old camera is a Canon Optura, and I've always been a Canon fan. The camera I'm lusting over right now is a Panasonic AG-HVX200. HD capability and Leica lense.

    Too many toys, never enough $$!

  15. #15
    Member dwhunter's Avatar
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    I have looked at that as well and you are right about the money part, the vast majority of our hunting and fishing trip we film are for the pure enjoyment of having the videos for watching later etc but we have put together a few that a couple of our local stores sells for us.

    Doug

  16. #16
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    For those of you who want someone to come along to videotape, why not hook up with one of the new residents on this forum? I've talked to quite a few new guys who want to go along on hunts during their first year so that they can get a feel for what Alaska hunting is all about. Offer to take one of these guys along, teach him what you know, and share the experience on the condition that they document the hunt via videocamera from start to finish. It's a win-win situation. I'm sure lots of our newly stationed military members and other new residents would greatly appreciate the opportunity to tag along.

    -Brian

  17. #17
    Member dwhunter's Avatar
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    Brian that is a great idea,

    Having served in the military in Alaska many years ago I know firsthand how difficult it can be to really get out and learn what you need to know in usually a short period of time. and I know their are many others that are working on that 1 year residency mark that would love the education as well.

    I am sure their would be many that would love the opportunity to tag along, video and learn.

    Doug

  18. #18

    Default Camera

    I'm soon buying a new camera for my endeavor as well. I'm leaning toward the Canon GL2.

  19. #19

    Default Video

    Bought a HDR HC3 last year and have taken it everywhere. Sheep and Moose hunting last season and a bunch of trout floats too. Learning Final Cut Pro while I go, having a blast.

  20. #20
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    Default Hunt Video Suggestions

    I bought a Sony HC 36 handycam. This was an upgrade from a much heavier bulkier Sony I previously owned. I love taking footage in the outdoors and have some good stuff. I put together a great video (1 hour 20 minutes) a couple of years ago. It will take me several years to get enough good material to match that one.

    Some suggestions:
    1. high optical zoom rather than digital zoom
    2. consider buying an additional telephoto lens for it. They are small and not too heavy.
    3. consider buying a long life battery
    4. keep your camera handy at all times. Mine stays on my belt or pack waist band. Many times the greatest footage just falls in your lap when you don't expect it.
    5. Take lots of footage. Don't worry about it flowing together with a theme as you take it. You can do all that in the editing process. I carry mine in all of preseason training hikes and get great stuff all summer.
    6. If you're planning a video that works through a hunt plan ahead.
    Take some footage at home packing gear and such. Take footage of the trip in and out. If you're flying in with another guy and flying seperately send the camera with the first guy. He can film the airplane coming inon it's second trip. Keep the camera in the filed for the second flight out so you can film the planes departure.
    7. Take still pics too. They are great mixed in with you video footage.

    I do all of mmy editing on a Macintosh and it is easy, but very time consuming to get a polished looking project. Some carefully selected music really helps bring it to life.

    Nothing better than watching your own footage except being in the field shooting it.

    Good shootin' to ya - whether it be gun, bow or camera.

    -Carnivore
    Everything that lives and moves will be food for you.
    Genesis 9:3

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