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Thread: Average Run Times?

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    Default Average Run Times?

    I know it is not always as easy as "doing the math" so with calm and clear weather conditions.....what are your average run time(s) to some areas of interest out of Homer? Chugach Islands? Seldovia, Halibut Cove? Anchor Point? And any others you want to throw in....areas of interest that is.

    Much Appreciated, P-geek

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    Quote Originally Posted by Physiksgeek View Post
    I know it is not always as easy as "doing the math" so with calm and clear weather conditions.....what are your average run time(s) to some areas of interest out of Homer? Chugach Islands? Seldovia, Halibut Cove? Anchor Point? And any others you want to throw in....areas of interest that is.

    Much Appreciated, P-geek
    How fast can your boat go? I can hit 38 mph on a good day with no people aboard and a short supply of gas, so I can make it to Seldovia in about half an hour. Anchor Point on a GOOD day in about 50 minutes. If you can only hit 20 mph in your boat its' obviously going to lengthen that time.
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    On a good day......full tank, calm seas, little to no wind I can top out around 30'ish mph. Not knowing what an "average" day out of Homer looks like, I thought I would ask the question and then adjust accordingly for the conditions we encounter when we head out.

    Thanks, P-geek

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    Hlibut cove is right across the bay in Homer so that is close. Seldovia pretty close as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Physiksgeek View Post
    On a good day......full tank, calm seas, little to no wind I can top out around 30'ish mph. Not knowing what an "average" day out of Homer looks like, I thought I would ask the question and then adjust accordingly for the conditions we encounter when we head out.

    Thanks, P-geek
    This all depends on your boat's set-up and how large it is. If it is an agressive deep-v that cuts though 1-3 chop well, you will be able to go at least 15-30 mph pretty comfortably in a 22 ft boat or larger. I have a C-Dory and find that I average in the high teens to low 20s most of the time in lower Cook Inlet around Homer on nice days with 3ft seas in the forecast. If it is 2 ft or less, I still only go 24-25 or so as the outboards are starting to scream at that point and I'd like for them to last a few more trips.... BTW Dave's times are good ball-park estimates.

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    I cruise 22-26mph most of the time, unless I am heading directly into 3' or bigger chop, then I am down to 15-20. But on most days, I make Seldovia in a little under an hour, Anchor Point seems to take a little over an hour, flat island is about an hour and a half, chugach islands in 2 hours. Never payed attention to time to halibut cove, but it seems like about a half hour give or take.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Physiksgeek View Post
    Not knowing what an "average" day out of Homer looks like, I thought I would ask the question and then adjust accordingly for the conditions we encounter when we head out.

    Thanks, P-geek
    Well, the problem with that is I don't think there is an "average" day. I GUESS you could say it would be about 1 to 2 ft. seas with about a 10 kt wind since it usually varies between 0 ft. seas with about a 1 kt. breeze up to about 6 ft. seas and 40 kt. winds so there's got to be an average day out there, but in all the time I've been out there I've never really thought of any day as being really average. There are really way too many variable to be able to come up with an average.

    Not to mention it can be 3 ft. seas inside the bay with a 20 kt. wind blowing from the east and if you head out to the Bluffs there will be a bit of a wind chop on the water and maybe a slight breeze blowing. Things change a lot depending on where you are in the bay. I've been 25 miles out in the middle in 5 to 6 footers with a 20 kt. wind out of the SW and by the time I got back in past Seldovia the seas had come down to 1 or 2 ft. and a slight breeze.

    And if the seas are coming from the west it's going to take you a lot longer to go west than it will heading back in when you've got a following wave.

    If I were you I'd just figure how far you are planning to run by measuring it on the chart, figure about what your average speed is and then just give yourself about a 10 or 15 minute "fudge time" depending on what the weather turns out to be like where you go to.
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    Default That is good info....

    Quote Originally Posted by Muttley Crew Fishing View Post
    If I were you I'd just figure how far you are planning to run by measuring it on the chart, figure about what your average speed is and then just give yourself about a 10 or 15 minute "fudge time" depending on what the weather turns out to be like where you go to.
    I know it is a pretty vauge question with all the possible variables that you could encounter but that is exactly what I am looking for - a "fudge time". I would have thought more than that with even as little as a 2ft change in the seas.....I regularly run all the time in the wind (less than 20mph) and river current but have less experience in anything over 3ft waves. And I have to go to Ky. Lake to see those.

    So what I am trying to figure out is if I get in to those 6ft seas, what does it add to my travel time? Thinking about it I should have asked the question that way.....What is the run time on an average day and then what is on a "not so average" day? If the answer is only 10-15 minutes...or 20 minutes for that matter then it may not be as important a question as I first thought.

    I Appreciate It, P-geek

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    Quote Originally Posted by Physiksgeek View Post
    So what I am trying to figure out is if I get in to those 6ft seas, what does it add to my travel time? I Appreciate It, P-geek
    Well, if it were me and I knew I was going out in real 6ft seas on Lower Cook Inlet, I'd be not going in a 22 foot boat to fish as it would be very uncomfortable and probably even dangerous when tide does it thing. There would probably even be a small craft advisory. I imagine the wind would be howling to boot. There might even be that lovely sideways rain....Not a good day at all......It would increase my travel time to a completely different day. I have seen plenty of seas that big and none of them I went out into on purpose - just stuff that blew in seemingly all of sudden. They are not fun and something to avoid altogether.

    Now if you find yourself in the open gulf during a high pressure and the weath guys and gals call for 6ft seas, that is entirely different story and very dooable as it is often long duration ocean well. Sure people get sea-sick in it all the time, but it is not really of danger like the big and steep wind waves can potentially be. I would likely fish with a ready eye on the horizon and the weather.

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    In my 23' tolman, I cruise at 22 knots, and slow down to 16 knots with a chop, and down to 12 knots in condions I'd rather not be out in. When we went over to halibut cove last time a pretty good wind had kicked up in the afternoon, so we were running around 16-17 knots, and as I recall it took about 1/2 hour to get there. It's been quite a few years since we went to Seldovia, so I don't recall how long it took. There are some islands you can tuck behind around Tutka bay, it's longer than a straight shot to Seldovia, but if it's rough you can spend some time in protected water, and maybe catch a couple of rock fish.

    Expect a breeze in the afternoon, so it'll take you longer to get to where you are going. Best advice is leave as early as possible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Physiksgeek View Post
    I know it is not always as easy as "doing the math" so with calm and clear weather conditions.....what are your average run time(s) to some areas of interest out of Homer? Chugach Islands? Seldovia, Halibut Cove? Anchor Point? And any others you want to throw in....areas of interest that is.

    Much Appreciated, P-geek
    The "Chugach Islands" are tricky. It can be nice all the way till you get past Point Adam and then Bam, there's the wind and chop and ya can't go any farther. I'd say it takes us, cruising at 28 MPH, about 1 1/2 to 2 hours to Elizabeth and another half hour to our favorite spot on Perl. Thing is there is ALOT of water to cross and the weather can go south at any time.

    Muttley pretty much got the rest.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Physiksgeek View Post
    I know it is a pretty vauge question with all the possible variables that you could encounter but that is exactly what I am looking for - a "fudge time". I would have thought more than that with even as little as a 2ft change in the seas.....I regularly run all the time in the wind (less than 20mph) and river current but have less experience in anything over 3ft waves. And I have to go to Ky. Lake to see those.

    So what I am trying to figure out is if I get in to those 6ft seas, what does it add to my travel time? Thinking about it I should have asked the question that way.....What is the run time on an average day and then what is on a "not so average" day? If the answer is only 10-15 minutes...or 20 minutes for that matter then it may not be as important a question as I first thought.

    I Appreciate It, P-geek
    I'll say one thing, if you're out there in 6 ft seas in anything less than at least a 26 ft. boat that can cut through those seas I'd add about an hour or two to the time it will take you to get back, if you can make it back at all. Those are nasty conditions even in my 26 ft. Hewescraft and leave a little perspiration on my upper lip as well as in my arm pits (and a few other unmentionable places, too). Like TR said, just don't do it unless it has been been predicted for a day or two and you know how to read the weather maps and can figure on what the weather might do. If it's like that and you're in anything less than a 26 to 30 ft. boat I think I'd stay home. I'm sure there will be the "naysayers" here that say, "Oh, I do it all the time and it's no problem." Unfortunately the people that you DON'T hear from here are the ones that have tried it and didn't make it. I wouldn't even take it into consideration as to what your run time will end up being. When the conditions are like that in a variable weather pattern (merging lows, unpredictable air masses, etc.) it can go from 6 ft. to 8 ft. in a very short time and then you are.....well, I won't use the word I'd use with people I am familiar with, but it begins with "f" and ends with "d". Not to mention if you are coming around Pogi and it's blowing NW you can get as far as Seldovia and it's blowing SE, so you run into completely different conditions. You aren't going to get a consistent wind and/or wave direction over that 25 mile run on ANY day. I've run from Pogi to Seldovia opening in 1 ft seas and as soon as I hit the Seldovia gap the SSE wind blowing through the gap has built those 1 footers up into 4 to 5 footers and I've had to cut my speed from 25 kts. to 10. Unfortunately there is no simple formula.

    When I was back east for Thanksgiving I was on the Major Deegan. Most traffic there flows at a nominal 70 mph. It took me 45 minutes to go 10 miles at one point. There was an accident that had totally bottlenecked things up. You're not going to run into accidents like that out on K-Bay (god willing) but you just NEVER know what the weather is going to throw at you out there.

    I fished well over 300 days out of the last 365 and I still am baffled by what some of the weather patterns can do out there in any given day. There is no better tutor than experience, but unfortunately if you pick the wrong experience you can find yourself in some serious trouble. I was out there about 15 years ago, not that experienced with the weather patterns of K-Bay off the Bluffs and in about a half an hour the seas went from about 1 ft. to about 6 ft. My ex and I couldn't understand why the dozen or so boats that had been fishing around us at the beginning suddenly weren't there anymore. We were in a 16 ft. Hewescraft and the one last boat that was fishing along side us followed along side us for about 5 minutes as we trolled merrily along wondering if we were being total idiots (I guess I can call myself an idiot if I want to) and then they powered up and headed for port. We figured at that point maybe we should do the same and followed along in their wake and it took us about an hour and a half to go the 14 miles we needed to get back to the harbor. Things change out there very quickly and for some people it has ended up being more than just an inconvenience. The ocean is a harsh mistress. Learn to respect her.

    In other words, I guess I'm saying you really can't count on an "average time" to get from one place to the other. Read the charts. Measure out the distances and write them down. Figure out what your "average" speed is and then take it from there. Like I said before, one minute of latitude is just slightly over a nautical mile. Take a piece of string and measure off with a sharpie a 6 ft. piece of string every minute for that 6 ft. and then you can get a pretty good idea of the exact distance it is from place to place and just extrapolate from there.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
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    Default 6ft Seas Are Out.....

    I have no interest in fighting the anchor or the swells so that was easy enough. I do not do it here so I would not have the desire to do it there either. I appreciate the input....

    P-geek

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