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Thread: 1,5x5-20mm leupold spring brownie

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    Member svehunter's Avatar
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    Default 1,5x5-20mm leupold spring brownie

    Do you guys thnk a 1,5x5-20 mm leupold is adecuate for spring brown bear hunting?

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    I think it would be adequate for hunting dangerous game any time of year.

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    Member svehunter's Avatar
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    Some guides I have spoken to say it may be to small for spring hunting because of the long shooting distances up to 200 yards do you agree?

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    Quote Originally Posted by svehunter View Post
    Some guides I have spoken to say it may be to small for spring hunting because of the long shooting distances up to 200 yards do you agree?
    A rifle scope is a sighting instrument not a spotting scope. In this case, the 1.5-5x20 Leupold provides actual magnification of 4.5x at the top end and that is more than sufficient for 200 yard shooting. In fact, that's plenty of magnification for shooting twice that far IMO. I'd say the 1.5x5 is among the better choices for any type of hunting in NA, though it's an especially good choice for bear (spring or fall).
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    The 1-4x scope is by far capable of shots at 400 yds or more. The standard Russian sniper scope during WWII was a 3 power and the germans feared the women who shot them. Some snipers claimed over 200 officers dog tags as trophies with their 7.64x54R rifles.
    The scope you speak of offers the best of both worlds. You can determine bullet placement on an charging animal at 20' and not just see a brown scope full of fur, or it also allows you to correctly place your shots at much longer distances.
    Practice using this sighting system and carry a good pair of BINOS for spotting and observing animals; you'll have the best of both worlds.
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    Member svehunter's Avatar
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    That sound reassuring brav thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    A rifle scope is a sighting instrument not a spotting scope. In this case, the 1.5-5x20 Leupold provides actual magnification of 4.5x at the top end and that is more than sufficient for 200 yard shooting. In fact, that's plenty of magnification for shooting twice that far IMO. I'd say the 1.5x5 is among the better choices for any type of hunting in NA, though it's an especially good choice for bear (spring or fall).
    The answer to your question cannot be put any better than what is said above.

    Maybe you should have some questions about the guides that told you the 1.5 x 5 is too small.
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    Member Matt's Avatar
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    I like the Leupold fixed 3 or 4 power, but the scope in question would work great as well. I doubt you'll be shooting at any bear over 200 yards. Even if you were, and with the scope cranked up to 5x, that is more than enough.

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    I think 1.5-5x magnification is just fine. My only concern with that scope would be light gathering. Potentially a problem if shooting a bear at last/low light. A Leupold VX3 in 1.75-6x would have a larger objective as would a Leupold Euro 30mm in 2-7x. Both those scopes run similar money to the 1.5-5x.

    Brett

    PS. I've shot animals with a .375 sporting a VX3 1.75-6x at 200 and 300 yards without a problem.

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    Remember that scopes don't "gather light"! While you get a larger exit pupil the brightness is going to be about the same -all decent scopes have a light transmissison of 90+ %. At lower powers you just aren't going to see any real difference in brightness. Contrast in another issue - picking an object out from a dark background- but that is going to vary more by the individual scopes. Personally I haven't been able to tell any real different in contrast in my testing of quite a variety of scopes from a number of major quality brands.

    The optical quality of lenses hasn't varied too much in the last few 40 years od so although mechancial construction is another issue. When the Japanese took up the manufacturing of optical goods in the late 60s and early 70s things pretty much elevated to a higher level as long as you stayed away from the really cheap bottom end junk. I don't think you can even buy a new scope today that doesn't far exceed the popular Weaver K series of the 50s to early 70s. I've still got my orginal K4 I bought back in the mid 60s - when I took it out to the range last year I couldn't believe how sorry it was!

    The Europeans typically hunt at night and use scopes with large objective lens and high powers but they aren't moving around and don't have to carry the rifles through the woods and brush.


    Quote Originally Posted by Brett Adam Barringer View Post
    I think 1.5-5x magnification is just fine. My only concern with that scope would be light gathering. Potentially a problem if shooting a bear at last/low light. A Leupold VX3 in 1.75-6x would have a larger objective as would a Leupold Euro 30mm in 2-7x. Both those scopes run similar money to the 1.5-5x.

    Brett

    PS. I've shot animals with a .375 sporting a VX3 1.75-6x at 200 and 300 yards without a problem.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    The Europeans typically hunt at night and use scopes with large objective lens and high powers but they aren't moving around and don't have to carry the rifles through the woods and brush.
    Very true, but the two scopes I recomended weight 11oz. Not exactly heavy.

    Brett

    PS. The Swarovski Z3 3-9x36mm I have on my sheep rifle is 11.some oz.

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    Bushnell Elite 6500 1.25x8x32mm should cover everything.

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    Default Exit pupil

    An advantage of the smaller scopes is that they are light as you point out.

    What I was attempting to point out was that the Europeans version of low light hunting is different from ours- they can use the higher power and bigger objective lens without a size or weight issue. Along the same line I have similar Hensoldt and Zeiss Jena (now Docter Optics) 1.5- 6X scopes that are huge relatively heavy scopes with 33mm tubes etc. Both these scopes are rail mounted so I'm still trying to get a way to mount them on something but that is another thread.

    Also - when I compare these scopes to my Leupold 1.5- 5 I can't tell any significant differences in brightness or contrast. The large exit pupil does make picking up a target a bit easier however and on a heavy large rifle the size and bulk may not matter.


    Quote Originally Posted by Brett Adam Barringer View Post
    Very true, but the two scopes I recomended weight 11oz. Not exactly heavy.

    Brett

    PS. The Swarovski Z3 3-9x36mm I have on my sheep rifle is 11.some oz.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    Remember that scopes don't "gather light"! While you get a larger exit pupil the brightness is going to be about the same -all decent scopes have a light transmissison of 90+ %. At lower powers you just aren't going to see any real difference in brightness. Contrast in another issue - picking an object out from a dark background- but that is going to vary more by the individual scopes. Personally I haven't been able to tell any real different in contrast in my testing of quite a variety of scopes from a number of major quality brands.

    The optical quality of lenses hasn't varied too much in the last few 40 years od so although mechancial construction is another issue. When the Japanese took up the manufacturing of optical goods in the late 60s and early 70s things pretty much elevated to a higher level as long as you stayed away from the really cheap bottom end junk. I don't think you can even buy a new scope today that doesn't far exceed the popular Weaver K series of the 50s to early 70s. I've still got my orginal K4 I bought back in the mid 60s - when I took it out to the range last year I couldn't believe how sorry it was!

    The Europeans typically hunt at night and use scopes with large objective lens and high powers but they aren't moving around and don't have to carry the rifles through the woods and brush.
    My old Ruger 243 wore a Weaver K6 fine crosshaired scope for 30 some years. I retired that gun with the idear of putting the scope on it's replacement a new Model 70 of the same caliber. When I got to the range my experience was pretty much the same as yours....I guess since I shot that gun 5 to 1 over any other gun I have I just got used to looking through that yellowish,brownish haze! When I looked through the Nikon on my 308 that day at the range I knew the K6 had to go! It went back on the old Ruger and they got retired together!

    I have shot a lot of <MOA groups with a straight 4x scope at 100 yards and my longest deer shots were with 4x scopes. To be honest there were times when I wished I could have turned that 4x down to 1x. I somethimes think the shooting rags have gone nuts on over magnification.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    A rifle scope is a sighting instrument not a spotting scope. In this case, the 1.5-5x20 Leupold provides actual magnification of 4.5x at the top end and that is more than sufficient for 200 yard shooting. In fact, that's plenty of magnification for shooting twice that far IMO. I'd say the 1.5x5 is among the better choices for any type of hunting in NA, though it's an especially good choice for bear (spring or fall).
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    I have both the VXII 1-4x20mm & the VXIII 1.5-5x20mm and both are great in low light conditions.

    If you can't get a great sight picture with them RECONCIDER that it is to late to take the shot. Good hunters pass on bad shots and take only good ones.

    How long is day time during the spring bears season? Hunters need to sleep some time and tracking in the dark seem less than optimal. I have tracked many a arrowed black bear at night so not too much of a scardey cat. No guns in bow camp so not any use in carring a bow at night.

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    Quote Originally Posted by svehunter View Post
    Some guides I have spoken to say it may be to small for spring hunting because of the long shooting distances up to 200 yards do you agree?
    I have that very scope mounted on my .338WM. I have shot and killed a caribou with one round at 300yards, I did not wish for an instant, that I needed more magnification. I shoot to 300 yards at the range everytime I go there, still, I do not feel I need a greater magnification scope. The guide you reference may need more scope due to his eye sight or merely personal preference,if you like the scope then by all means use it.


    BTW, I would consider a 200 yard shot at a bear the absolute maximum range unless it was wounded and making tracks . Get close, then get closer .

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    Quote Originally Posted by .338WM View Post
    I have that very scope mounted on my .338WM. I have shot and killed a caribou with one round at 300yards, I did not wish for an instant, that I needed more magnification. I shoot to 300 yards at the range everytime I go there, still, I do not feel I need a greater magnification scope. The guide you reference may need more scope due to his eye sight or merely personal preference,if you like the scope then by all means use it.



    BTW, I would consider a 200 yard shot at a bear the absolute maximum range unless it was wounded and making tracks . Get close, then get closer .
    That answer feels very reassuring thanks!

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    Great scope my test for a low power scope is if I can see the end of the barrel on low power this makes finding your target very easy in sticky situations while 5 power on the high side should be plenty of magnification for a safe shot. I'm not a huge fan of pulling the trigger on bears if it's so dark I need my scope to gather light to see the bear.
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    I agree with that I would never shoot a bear in low light conditions anyway,too risky

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