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Thread: Advice on 460 S&W loads

  1. #1
    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    Default Advice on 460 S&W loads

    I know I have been asking a lot about 460 S&W but need some advice, as this is my first time loading any handgun rounds

    I got my first batch of 20 loaded up Using starline brass, and WLR primers. I used 29.4 grains of accurate #9 powder, and topped it off with 300 grain Hornady XTPs. I shold be getting around 1500 FPS with this load, my question is, should I be crimping or anything else before I fire them?

    Thanks
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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    I think youíre on your way quite well, I donít like Winchester primers and have never used #9 but know some guys that have good luck with them. I use CCI primers with Lilgun and some H110/W295 under CP lead in my 460s. Lilgun is my favorite by far for delivering big power cleanly and Iíve had no issue with flame cutting at all after burning over 5lbs of it through one of my guns. All my 460 data comes from Hodgdon on-line data because there was no data in any of the books when I started loading for it and this source has served me quite well.

    Some kind of crimping is a must for the hot stuff to be sure your gun doesnít lock from un-seated bullets when you need it most. There is a crimp built into my 460 dies and it works fine if all adjusted which is a pain so I want a Lee factory crimp die at some point. I test my defense ammo by loading 5 in the gun with the 5th marked and OAL measured. Fire the 4 un marked rounds, then put in 4 more and fire them, 4 more and fire them. After that 5th round has been through the 12 recoil cycles re-measure the OAL to see if the bullet moved any.
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    If you are loading for a S&W made revolver note that the cylinders on these guns are quite long. You can load the bullet relatively shallow in the case and still have plenty of length to the end of the cylinder. The more space in the case - i.e. a more shallow seated bullets or a longer overall length- allows for lower pressures at a given powder load.

    The same thing goes for the .500 S&W - I load my bullets as far out as possible to lower the pressure and allow of more powder and velocity. Just what you need in a .500 - more power!
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    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    I highly recommend you give some cast bullets a try too. They are cheaper than jacketed bullets, and heavy, wide meplat hard-cast bullets have been proven to be more effective against dangerous animals like brown bears. Also, for some fun light loads that are a pleasure to shoot all day, pick up some trail boss powder. With trail boss, you can actually produce .45 ACP level ballistics in the .460 brass. I always crimp into the cannelures in my jacketed bullets, and the crimp grooves in my cast bullets. (I use a heavier crimp for lead) The only ones I've ever seen back out of their crimp are some 535 gr. tyranosaurs. I'm convinced I could solve that problem with a factory crimp die, I just haven't bought one yet.

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    I second AKSOLDIER: Trailboss is a blast to plink with.

    A crimp is a must, and I too have had good luck with #9. I loaded up some 200 and 275 grain Barnes XPB's and should be getting over 2000 FPS with both of them with the load data published on the Barnes website using #9. That's similar to the velocities of a 200 grain barnes TSX in a .308, except it's coming out of a handgun. The XPB's should deliver massive amounts of hydrostatic shock too. I am looking forward to hunting with them.

    For bear protection I use 335 grain Cast Performance slugs at about 1600 FPS with #9. They shoot very consistantly and chrono'd under a 20 FPS standard deviation.

    If you are using XTP's they will have a cannalure intended for a roll crimp. You can do this with most .460 dies. I recommend it because not only does it keep the bullets from backing out, it also helps with consistancy.

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    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice, I will have to go back in my man cave and start crimping tonight.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
    "Swans are a gift" -DucksandDogs
    I am a shoveler's worst nightmare!

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