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Thread: catching halibut from shore??

  1. #1
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    Default catching halibut from shore??

    Am planing a trip to Alaska Jun 15th - July 15th fishing the Russian river for salmon.

    I would like to try my hand at fishing for halibut a couple of days from shore, no charters. Two 20LB chickens per day would be nice if at all possible.

    Can someone recommend a good halibut spot between Kenai and Homer.

    Has anybody had any luck fishing for halibut off Homer spit rd.

    Are there boat rentals around Kenai or other areas? the water around Kenai seems to be claim for the most part.

    Don.

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    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don s. View Post
    Am planing a trip to Alaska Jun 15th - July 15th fishing the Russian river for salmon.

    I would like to try my hand at fishing for halibut a couple of days from shore, no charters. Two 20LB chickens per day would be nice if at all possible.

    Can someone recommend a good halibut spot between Kenai and Homer.

    Has anybody had any luck fishing for halibut off Homer spit rd.

    Are there boat rentals around Kenai or other areas? the water around Kenai seems to be claim for the most part.

    Don.
    I think you would have a better chance to win mega bucks before your gonna consistantly catch chicken halibut from shore. I got a friend whom states, they have done it near Starisky Creek, but he is also know for stretching tails and I'm not talking about breaking a neck of a fish to try to get an extra 1/2 inch to make it legal. You can fish from shore end the end of the spit and you will catch Pollock, possible salmon and small flounder. If you catch a Halibut, your blessed. The rest of the spit is shallow and goes out a ways. You will see it when the tide goes out. It is possible however to use an inflatable just off the spit several hundred yards where it starts to drop off and catch some, but its hit and miss IMO. My boss caught one in an inflateable over 100 pounds two years ago just off the spit in about 30 feet of water. He does the inflatable thing a few times each year in the summer, but is not always sucessful. If your coming to Alaska, save your pocket change now for a charter and enjoy the moment. There are boat rentals, but they are not cheap. Buy the time you rent one, get equipment, bait, gas etc, the charter will look cheap. Sorry for the report, but I'm not gonna surgar coat anything and give you false hope. Hope you have a memorable trip.

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    Thank for you honest opinion.

    Don.

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    Member MRFISH's Avatar
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    Chico is right...you may certainly be able to catch a halibut from shore (end of Homer Spit or surf casting from Deep Creek and the likes) but your odds are low, and that kind of fishing is not what I would consider "consistent". Halibut are more consistently caught in deeper, offshore waters.

    If you want to try fishing from the beach...look for where halibut feed might be readily available. At the end of the Homer Spit, this is where a fish processing plant discharges it's ground-up fish waste parts...to the north of Homer, try near the streams/rivers that empty into Cook Inlet.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by MRFISH View Post
    Chico is right...you may certainly be able to catch a halibut from shore (end of Homer Spit or surf casting from Deep Creek and the likes) but your odds are low, and that kind of fishing is not what I would consider "consistent". Halibut are more consistently caught in deeper, offshore waters.

    If you want to try fishing from the beach...look for where halibut feed might be readily available. At the end of the Homer Spit, this is where a fish processing plant discharges it's ground-up fish waste parts...to the north of Homer, try near the streams/rivers that empty into Cook Inlet.
    Yeah, as Chico said, I wouldn't "surgar coat" it (whatever "surgar" is), but chances are you're not going to catch much in the way of halibut from the end of the spit.

    You're best be would be from the shore at Whiskey Gulch on a very high tide. On extreme high tide days the kings and halibut move pretty close into shore and if you fish about an hour before and after the extreme high tide you might just get lucky. If you have a good surf casting rig I'd cast a nice big piece of herring out about as far as you can cast it and let it soak. I bet you'd find at least a decent sized chicken willing to take your offering. I caught a 70 lb. halibut while I was trolling for kings about 50 yards from shore once. They move in at high tide to chase the bait that moves in on the tide, so you just have to catch them at the right time. If you can't afford a charter and have nothing better to do give it a try.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
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  6. #6

    Default Seward

    A young man who works for me catches halibut from shore down in Seward. He fishes just after exiting city center on Lowell Point Road, right after the bridge by the big waterfall but before the fish processing plant. Lots of good gravel to stand on. He uses a J hook with a chunk of herring on it--nothing fancy. The halibut are chickens, to be sure, but he will usually catch one when he fishes there. He's an uncommonly good fisherman, however--when I've had him on my boat, he'll be hauling various species of fish in from 300 to 400 feet with his J hooks while I and my other guests sit there with our C hooks watching him, hoping for a tug.

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