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Thread: outside gardens

  1. #1
    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    Default outside gardens

    I am going to get an area started as soon as I can start working it, what all is a good outside crops. I will start with carrots, potatos, what else is good to grow outdoors in the mat su
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
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    Iron
    Peas is on my hit list I do two kinds an early one and not so early also
    The grandkids just love them to I got one that come over and gets some for her lunch at school
    And easy to freeze for the winters stew (And you pick them standing up)
    Just think Peas carrots ,potatos and a moose rost (a cold beer)
    one nice meal or two to say this came from MY garden
    Have fun be safe and enjoy

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Last year was my first go-round, but for what it's worth, I was very successful with the following crops outdoors:

    green leaf lettuce
    spinach
    broccoli
    cauliflower
    kale
    bok choi
    carrots
    potatoes

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    Potatoes, carrots, just about any brassica, and rhubarb although it's a perennial.
    Chuck

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    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    Radishes are also a good easy one. They are one of the earlier crops, and some times you can get 3 crops in a decent summer.
    The other thing I didn't see mentioned is Cabbage. For best results start cabage indoors or buy starts.
    zuccini can also be sucsessfully grown here. Again for best results start indoors or buy starts.

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    Add to the ones already listed, arctic tomotes. Wife usually plants about 18 plants and we get lots of tomotes. These are outdoor ones and do quite well up here.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Bearcat View Post
    Add to the ones already listed, arctic tomotes. Wife usually plants about 18 plants and we get lots of tomotes. These are outdoor ones and do quite well up here.
    Where do you get your seeds/starts? I haven't heard of those, but would love to grow some outdoor tomatoes.

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    The wife gets our from Bushes Bunches outside of Palmer. There are other green houses that also sell them. One needs to look early as they do not last long as the green houses. Last year we gave away about 200 lbs of green tomotes, after we kept what we wanted.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironartist View Post
    I am going to get an area started as soon as I can start working it, what all is a good outside crops. I will start with carrots, potatos, what else is good to grow outdoors in the mat su

    We have a 24'x24' garden plot in a sunny spot. we grow 2 types of peas. Freezonian is a good type for this area.. we plant 1 1/2 rows of this and 1/2 row of Sugar Snaps.. When the sugar snaps get going, you'll have to pick them every other day..

    we plant 2 rows of radishes, one early and one much later.
    we usually try one row each of two different type of snap beans.. Some years they do great and some years not so great.
    a short row of red leaf lettuce and finish the row with as many head of Romain as I can squeeze in.
    a short row of turnips or rutabegas (for moose stew)
    a row of beets..
    2 row of carrots one early and one a little later.
    at least 6 Brussel Sprouts plants, 6 green cabbages and 6 red cabbages and 6 cauliflower plants...
    we buy all the Starter plants at the local markets or neighborhood greenhouses..

    I'd stay away from starter plants that have been shipped up from the lower 48..
    they just don't do as well as what has been started locally..

    another word of caution, all those starter plants are small and one might have a tendency to plant them too close together.. You'll want those brassica's about 18" apart by the time they mature...

    Both Raspberries and Strawberries do well here in the valley and make excellent jams/jellies and wines.. Rhubarb grown on a warm south side of a house does exceptionally well and makes for great pies (and wines)..

    the weather is always a big factor in growing a nice garden. Some years it's too cool, some too wet and some too dry.. occasionally we get a year that is Just Right..

    Good Luck

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Last year was my first go-round, but for what it's worth, I was very successful with the following crops outdoors:

    green leaf lettuce
    spinach
    broccoli
    cauliflower
    kale
    bok choi
    carrots
    potatoes

    Brian
    if space is ever an issue in your garden, beet tops are a great subsitute for spinach, and you get the beets as a bonus...

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old John View Post
    Brian
    if space is ever an issue in your garden, beet tops are a great subsitute for spinach, and you get the beets as a bonus...
    Good to know. I never have developed a taste for beets, but I'm guessing it had to do with the preparation. I'd like to try them again and grow some if we like 'em. We love our spinach, though. Almost every night last summer we were having spinach and lettuce salads, so I think my wife would revolt if I didn't plant some. We did overdo it a bit last year, though, so we might thin those out a bit and add something else to the mix. I do have a relatively limited area, but we might add to that this spring.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old John View Post
    We have a 24'x24' garden plot in a sunny spot. we grow 2 types of peas. Freezonian is a good type for this area.. we plant 1 1/2 rows of this and 1/2 row of Sugar Snaps.. When the sugar snaps get going, you'll have to pick them every other day..
    We'll be adding peas to our garden this year. Do you start those from seed in the ground, or do you plant starts that were started indoors? We started most of our plants indoors last year with the exception of spinach and carrots which were seeds in the ground. What is the approach with peas?

  13. #13

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    Has any one tried sunchokes? I just had them for the first time a few months ago and I am hooked.

  14. #14

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    Brian, Met a lady last year that sells produce in the Anchorage markets our garden club done a tour of her place off of Palmer Fishook and the way she did her peas is to plant the seeds in six packs and then transplant ,by doing that they can be transplanted with out disturbing the root system and they can get a better start by being inside when the nights are cooler ,but still growing. By the way her plants did real well even with the weather that we had last year. Good luck and hope that we have a growing type of summer.

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    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    I am new to gardens, when should one start their stuff indoors, do you put them under light indoors how many hours of light a day? My back room that faces south is a tad cool should I use anything to warm the plants a bit? I tried tomatos last year and had no luck guess I need to build some liitle frame for a greenhouse
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    iron - I started my lettuce, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, bok choi, and zucchini indoors sometime in late April. For guidance on when to do what, I would suggest reading Jeff Lowenfel's weekly column in the Daily News. He has a little box in his column with quick guides on what should be happening when. I live at about 1,500', so I delayed everything by a week off of what he suggested for Anchorage gardeners and it worked out well. Some plants you want to start as seeds in the ground in mid-late May, though, as they don't transplant well. I did that with my carrots and spinach per instructions I received. As for the indoor starts, I put mine under regular fluorescent lights that were set on a timer for 18 hours of light a day. Full spectrum lights aren't needed (though maybe they help?). The room these plants were in has absolutely zero natural light and they did just fine with the fluorescent light. When it is close to time for planting you need to start hardening them off (getting them used to natural light and wind). If you don't, they'll die or at least struggle mightily when put in the ground. Start by putting them outside for a few hours a day and increase the amount of natural light and air that they get each day. Once you can leave them outdoors overnight and through a day with no obvious wilting, they're ready to go in the ground. It should take about 7 days to properly harden them off, though I did the process in 3 days last year due to a tight schedule. (It should be noted that I paid the price for a shorter hardening off process, as some zucchini plants were fried by a couple days of intense sunlight and never recovered. Everything else wilted badly in the 12 hours/day of direct sunlight, but recovered after a few days. Longer is better for hardening off.)

    Big Bend - Good to know on the peas. I'll go ahead and start some indoors when I do my other starts. Thanks for the tip.

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    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    Thumbs up dreaming of summer and garden time

    This thread is getting me excited about summer and gardens! Might be time to start thinking about getting a seed order together.

    The flood last summer took out one of my gardens, so we will have to work on another this spring. First year gardens usually don't do as well and the old proven ones, but you gotta work with what you have. I might do some plants in buckets and containers here and there too this year.

    Grandma Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    we bought a bunch the other day, was thinking about trying some herbs under florecents wonder how that would fly?
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironartist View Post
    we bought a bunch the other day, was thinking about trying some herbs under florecents wonder how that would fly?
    Works well. Give it a shot.

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    I here you Grandma I was thinking the same thing
    Summer well be here soon

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