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Thread: Where can I fish with a airboat for halibut or rock fish?

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    Default Where can I fish with a airboat for halibut or rock fish?

    I need info on where I can use my airboat to saltwater fish for halibut or rock fish that is calm water, or not very big waves. Any info would be appreciated.

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    I don't think this is a good idea and have no idea where you would go.

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    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    New Sagaya would be your safest bet.......Im not a saltwater expert by anymeans but I would not be taking an airboat in the salt ever
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

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    Bzzzzzzz. I use to be like that years ago, but I now have to pass a piss test to keep my current job!
    If you don't care for New Sagaya, you could try 10th & M.
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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    It always amazes me what I see leaving the harbor in Whittier. Flat bottom jet boats with children and even a canoe here and there. I have yet to see an air boat, but if you do I hope you have a rather large life insurance policy.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    I have seen a couple in Valdez. They mainly come down during the silver derby. I saw one that was yellow in color and it had a twin hull catamaran set up. There are a few rock fish and some halibut in the harbor.

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    I saw an airboat a couple of year ago entering Culross Pass. Last year I saw a lake-type pontoon boat in Passage Canal. One time I saw someone water skiing in PWS. The only one that didn't leave me scratching my head was the water skier.

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    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Another idea would be to find someone with a salt boat (like on here) that wants to trade out trips with you. Yu go on thier boat for some halibut, and you run them up your favorite river for salmon or trout sometime.
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    My neighbor takes his driftboat out when the weather is good and gets his limit in 30' of water. It is not advisible to use a flat bottom boat in Cook inlet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by qkayak View Post
    My neighbor takes his driftboat out when the weather is good and gets his limit in 30' of water. It is not advisible to use a flat bottom boat in Cook inlet.
    Probably wise in this day and age with weekend sailors, but should be noted that probably ALL small boats in Cook Inlet up until the 60s were flat bottomed and people ranged from Seldovia to Anchorage in them. Those were the (once) well known "Cook Inlet dories", which I guess are being lost to antiquity. Many folks still use flat bottom boats for set-netting because they are infinitely more beachable than a v-bottom. I still see lots of flat bottom skiffs moored in/leaving Homer harbor.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    There's a big difference between a flat bottomed dories with decent freeboard, and flared sides that provide "reserve boyancy" and an airboat that has minimal freeboard.

    I think of any area that would provide both protected water that an airboat could safely be used in the ocean and a reasonable expectation of catching fish.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    There's a big difference between a flat bottomed dories with decent freeboard, and flared sides that provide "reserve boyancy" and an airboat that has minimal freeboard.

    I think of any area that would provide both protected water that an airboat could safely be used in the ocean and a reasonable expectation of catching fish.
    Absolutely, and I was not inferring that anyone SHOULD BE DUMB ENOUGH TO GO OUT IN THE SALT IN AN AIRBOAT. Just responding to the flat bottom comment. Flat bottoms, in and of themselves, do not constitute an unseaworthy boat. Rough riding, perhaps, but unseaworthy, no. The Time Bandit is a flat bottom craft.

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    I guess I should have been more clear by saying "small flat bottom jons". You could catch fish out there on an air mattress on a good day. But I'll take my deep v with high sides because I know I'll have a better chance of coming home.

    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Probably wise in this day and age with weekend sailors, but should be noted that probably ALL small boats in Cook Inlet up until the 60s were flat bottomed and people ranged from Seldovia to Anchorage in them. Those were the (once) well known "Cook Inlet dories", which I guess are being lost to antiquity. Many folks still use flat bottom boats for set-netting because they are infinitely more beachable than a v-bottom. I still see lots of flat bottom skiffs moored in/leaving Homer harbor.

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