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Thread: Golden King Crab

  1. #1
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    Default Golden King Crab

    Anyone tried Golden King Crab fishing in Knight Island passage yet this year?

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    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    Gold kings? I didn't know we had em! I know theres brown king, red and blues but I thought Nome was the gold king spot. Hey how does a guy tell if he's got a golden king?

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    Quote Originally Posted by fullbush View Post
    Gold kings? I didn't know we had em! I know theres brown king, red and blues but I thought Nome was the gold king spot. Hey how does a guy tell if he's got a golden king?
    It is easy to tell the golden king crab from the others. Golden king crab come with a little gold crown, are accompanied by servant crabs, and have a little tag on the butts that say golden king crab. It is my understanding that they are very rare.....

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    There are technically four species of King crab. Red, Blue, Golden and Scarlet. There has been a personal use Golden King Crab Fishery in PWS for the last two years. My understanding is that Knight Island Passage is has a fair amount of Golden Kings available.

    The "Brown" species commonly caught in Southeast is actually a red King Crab with a slightly different diet than those caught in the Bering Sea and Bristol Bay. Therefore it has a reddish/brown shell.

  5. #5

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    Rick,
    Sorry but I have to correct you on this one. Browns are not RKC they are goldens. The reason they have two names was for marketing some 10+ years ago. Golden sounds better than brown. On telling the diffrence Reds have a white underside and thier tops can be a plethora of diffrent shades depending on how long it has been since they molted. Not sure where you got your info on southeast?

    If you do try for them make sure you have the right gear, goldens/browns live deep 80-300fa. You need a heavey pot and a good hardball on your buoy setup. When there is a halfway decent tide your buoy will get pulled under and the hard ball will bring it back to the surface. Remember to look for your pot around slack tide. Golden/browns also like structure as compared with reds that like mud and sand bottoms. Good luck.

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    Mallardman is correct. Golden or Brown King Crabs are the same. In this thread we can see the benefit of using the scientific name to reduce confusion.

    According to the ADF&G Wildlife Notebook Series:

    In Alaska there are three commercial king crab species. Red king crabs, Paralithodes camtschaticus, have been the commercial "king" of Alaska's crabs. It occurs from British Columbia to Japan with Bristol Bay and the Kodiak Archipelago being the centers of its abundance in Alaska. Blue king crabs, P. platypus, live from Southeastern Alaska to Japan with the Pribilof and St. Matthew Islands being their highest abundance areas in Alaska. Golden king crabs, Lithodes aequispinus, are distributed from British Columbia to Japan with the Aleutian Islands their Alaska stronghold of abundance. Red and blue kings can occur from the intertidal zone to 100 fathoms or more. Golden king crabs live mostly between 100-400 fathoms, but can occur from 50-500 fathoms.


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    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Can anyone explain the logic behind this being a winter fishery? Is it due to the habits of the crab, or does F&G want to limit access?

    I would be interested in giving this a try, but not in the winter.
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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
    Can anyone explain the logic behind this being a winter fishery? Is it due to the habits of the crab, or does F&G want to limit access?

    I would be interested in giving this a try, but not in the winter.
    It might have something to do with their molting or breeding cycle, I am just guessing though
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    Member polardds's Avatar
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    Most likely due to molting. The Kachemak bay Tanner crab fishery starts too early. Allot of the younger crabs are soft in the early part of the season. The other reason for a winter fishery is to limit the number of people participating in it.

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    Opportunity!

    When I can have at them from the market, I sieze it.

    They are excellent...

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