Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23

Thread: How do you protect your meat in camp?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default How do you protect your meat in camp?

    I have never lost any meat to bears in the field or in camp even though I had bears come into camp. What has worked for you to keep your meat safe?

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska
    Posts
    191

    Default

    As a registered guide and when killing ungulates late in the evening in Alaska, my policy is to remove the internal organs - including windpipe and colon - and to drag those portions as far as possible so that they aren't right next to the carcass and then, I drain the body cavity before either propping it completely open for circulation (moose) or rolling it onto it's belly so that the back, shoulders and hind-quarters are exposed to cool night air and to prevent rain from pooling in the body cavity, as well as to keep aerial scavengers from accessing any exposed meat.

    Then the following morning, I go back to the carcass and begin the quarting/boning process before then beginning the work of transporting (on foot) each portion of meat to the entry point (airtstrip, etc.). Of course, hide/cape and antlers go out on the last load and with sheep, the horns travel with all portions of meat as required by law.

    In terms of bears and when killing those late in the evening, I leave them till the following morning - spread in a fashion so that skinning is easiest - and then I go back to the kill-site the very next morning to remove and then transport hide and skull.

    Rob

  3. #3
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    KP, the dingleberry of Alaska
    Posts
    1,750

    Default

    Divide the quarters and hang 'em high, under a tarp to keep the meat dry and cool. No need for bags unless flies are especially bad.
    "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rutting Moose View Post
    What has worked for you to keep your meat safe?
    I always use a condom, that keeps my meat safe.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    I always use a condom, that keeps my meat safe.



    Wouldn’t it be safer it you had your boy friend tested for HIV?

  6. #6

    Default

    ****, thats rough.

  7. #7

    Default

    How do you protect your meat in camp?

    I wear underwear AND longjohns!

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,022

    Default

    Wow, this thread degraded in record fashion !

    Bagged, hung off the ground and covered by tarp to keep shaded and dry, in camp. Never had a bear come into camp and disturb anything, it may be that where I hunt has few bears (dunno), or may be a result of strategic urination locations about my camp as deterant, whatever the case the things I do seem to be working. I also keep a very clean camp.

    Never lost meat left in the field either, only twice was anything left overnight. I am of the opinion. learned from watching "nature" shows while growing up, you know, the real ones that used to be shown, where one sees the predator kill and eat the prey, that the predator/scavenger will seek and and consume first, the viscera. With the animal gutted and separated from the entrails as much as possible, the bear will feed on the "pile" first, and perhaps, only the pile and move on, or take a siesta allowing time for your return and shooing of the bear (or filling another tag) to facilitate retrieval of the meat.

  9. #9
    New member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    10

    Default

    If you are worried about it you could carry in moth balls and spread around the meat.. until you return in the morning

  10. #10
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska - I wasn't born here, but I got here as soon as I could!
    Posts
    3,279

    Default

    Vigilence and a .338 WM. Seriously though, I only lost meat once, and that was to a wolverine. A bear fence would have been effective...if I had one. Hang the meat high enough/in such a manner to make the critters work for it, and chances are, they'll leave it alone.

  11. #11
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Anchorage,Alaska
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aksquirrel View Post
    How do you protect your meat in camp?

    I wear underwear AND longjohns!
    haha good thinking... i guess great minds think alike

  12. #12
    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Gnome, Ak
    Posts
    787

    Default

    Carry a bear tag.
    Know guns. Know peace. Know safety.

    No guns: no peace. No safety!

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,636

    Default

    Piss fence has never failed.
    Communicates exactly whos here and who meat it is.
    A loose Dog, the Radio playing, people talking normal, after ahwile Bears get the picture.

    Keep your meat up and your teapot hot, you wont have a problem.







    Not Spring, Fall, Summer or Winter, in Camp, the boat or at home, never had problem with a bear.

    Ravens will eat down through a Caribou's back to eat. A whole Murder will strip a Caribou carcass inna day, easy.

    We chop willows and alders, and stack them over whole carcasses by the tents, keep the birds off and the meats marked, if a blow covers them in snow.

    If Im transporting them, in summer I leave the skin on, to keep the sand and leaves off....if its to a camp in Winter and not home, I skin em and dissassemble em, and if I have time, I process and dry/freeze my meats, to take home/trade/givaway.
    I bury them inna tarp in snow winter time, if its summer, I hang 'em up high and dry somewhere.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  14. #14
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by .338WM View Post
    Wow, this thread degraded in record fashion !

    Bagged, hung off the ground and covered by tarp to keep shaded and dry, in camp. Never had a bear come into camp and disturb anything, it may be that where I hunt has few bears (dunno), or may be a result of strategic urination locations about my camp as deterant, whatever the case the things I do seem to be working. I also keep a very clean camp.

    Never lost meat left in the field either, only twice was anything left overnight. I am of the opinion. learned from watching "nature" shows while growing up, you know, the real ones that used to be shown, where one sees the predator kill and eat the prey, that the predator/scavenger will seek and and consume first, the viscera. With the animal gutted and separated from the entrails as much as possible, the bear will feed on the "pile" first, and perhaps, only the pile and move on, or take a siesta allowing time for your return and shooing of the bear (or filling another tag) to facilitate retrieval of the meat.

    Speaking of Urinating around a meat cache... my Son's and I have hunted from the same camp for several years.. We have a meadow that has been quite productive over the years.. each sets under a different spruce tree to gain a broader coverage of the area... Never gave it much thought for a couple years, then we began to notice bears marking on or around the trees where we'd set. The scrawny little spruce tree that I favored suddenly one year showed claw marks from about the 7 1/2 ft level downward.. I think the bear was challanging me... unfortunately I couldn't reach higher, nor was I able to put any claw marks on the tree.. So I just kept on setting there over the years and when I had to get rid of a couple cups of refined camp coffee, I would walk away 10 or 15 yards and relieve myself... each time in a little different spot, creating a ring of urine smell around "My" tree,..,. Then about a year later, in camp, the two spruce trees we had always used to hold up our camp meat pole was suddenly ragged with claw marks.. the last time we measured those trees were clawed from about the 8ft level down... the game was on... unfortunately, this year when we arrived in camp... one of the spruce trees had succumbed to some of those high winds last spring...(??) and We had to find a couple new trees to use for our meat poles...

  15. #15
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Mat-Su
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    Alaskan nailed it....if you have a tag in your pocket, no doubt that bears will steer clear of your camp....and if they do come in, you just made your hunt that much more productive....

  16. #16
    Member kantill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Sutton AK
    Posts
    158

    Default

    I know this isn't what you guys meant but what do you do to keep it cool for long periods of time. Say you are on a week long hunt and get something early but still going to be out for the rest of the week?

  17. #17
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Anchorage,Alaska
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dkwarthog View Post
    Alaskan nailed it....if you have a tag in your pocket, no doubt that bears will steer clear of your camp....and if they do come in, you just made your hunt that much more productive....
    couldn't have said it any better.. words from a TRUE Alaskan haha.. I Agree!!!

  18. #18
    Member yogibear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    226

    Default

    In some cases, you have to call in an early pick up of meat. This is expensive, and thus should be considered before you pull the trigger. I've read some heart breaking stories on here of triggers not pulled because there was no way of getting the harvest out with out a risk of spoilage.

    Meat poles, while not affective against scavengers, will help to keep meat cool. On a caribou hunt on the slope, we built and brought our own 2x4 meat pole. There was no shade and in August there was more than enough sun. We used a tarp, silver/grey side up to reflect the sun and help keep it cool. For smaller game meat "stands" can be made of willow. This allows air to circulate around it and keep it cool and dry.

    And then there's the basics, good quality game bags (the only thing made of cotton in an Alaskan hunter's camp) and citric acid spray to keep the flies from laying eggs.

    Quote Originally Posted by kantill View Post
    I know this isn't what you guys meant but what do you do to keep it cool for long periods of time. Say you are on a week long hunt and get something early but still going to be out for the rest of the week?

  19. #19
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    I always keep a tag in my pocket and have never had any issues.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,636

    Default

    Wouldnt the Tag be about usless for a Sow w/cubs?...............oh, ya not T A G, its a D L P..........~~LOL!!~~
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •