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Thread: Canoe Trips

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    Default Canoe Trips

    Hey I was wondering if anyone had any good suggestions for a good 3 week river canoe trip. I am not from the state and am looking to head up and canoe a river where I will have the least likely chance to run into anyone. have been re-searching the porcupine and chandalar. Nothing of too great a challenge seeing as how i dont know the area but not a novice run either. would greatly appreciate any suggestions

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    Default canoe trips in alaska

    welcome to the forum
    below is a one book i found on amazon.com, there are probably others if you do a search.
    another is "Floating hunting Alaska's rivers," very good read, with info on different rivers, their location, and how to access them.
    many other people on here have intimate knowledge of specific rivers.
    good luck,
    tom..................




    http://www.amazon.com/Alaska-Wildern...ref=pd_sim_b_5

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    there are a lot of good rivers to float, there should be some extra equipment that you will need in Alaska, SAT. phone be carfull get one that will work in area that you choose, an some self defence [ bear spray,/ gun ] 2 good GPS's as there will be times you could be 50 or more miles form the nearest town/help good luck

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjcarlson View Post
    have been re-searching the porcupine and chandalar. Nothing of too great a challenge seeing as how i dont know the area but not a novice run either.
    From what I have been told the Chandalar will fit your requirement of not seeing people and a decent float, but unless you go from highway crossing to highway crossing it won't be a 3 week trip. You would have to stop and do a lot of hikes and check out some old mining spots along the river below the lake.

    If you are using a solid canoe it will have to be a road to road trip. If you are using an inflatable you can take out above Venetie and be flown back to the Shelf or Coldfoot.

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    Default AK Canoe-3wks-

    First, recommend go to Amazon and get Dan Mclean's book, Paddling the Yukon River and its Tributaries. Great planning book: He has taken each of these trips, maps in book and info to order maps needed, time to expect, special challenges and rewards to expect on each trip discussed. Much more than just the Yukon- all its tributaries included.

    Rivers in Alaska, which can be paddled without challenging whitewater, are both the past and present highways of the Alaskan bush. Thus, it will be challenging to go 3 weeks and not see more people than you may want--other trippers, working skiffs, villages, etc.

    I was looking for a simliar 3 wk or so trip with limited exposure to other people. I've decided to paddle (solo probably) next summer from the Dempster Hwy in the Yukon to the Dalton Hwy in Alaska, which is over 700 miles-- 500 or so above the Arctic Circle. Route departs 2 miles north of Eagle Plains, YT on the Eagle River (Google maps Dempster turns 90 degrees east, then right away back north-river is the Eagle). Planning 4-5 days on Eagle, which converges with the Bell River. About 1-2 days on the Bell, which will converge with th e Porcupine. Then 15-20 days on Porcupine, which will converge with the Yukon at Ft. Yukon. Then about 5 days to the Dalton Hwy (Yukon Crossing). This trip starts in a little more than a creek (Eagle River) and will pass no villages until Old Crow, YT (300 miles from nearest road). Next inhabited village will be Fort Yukon at about mile 525. This will be my first long canoe trip also, but have enjoyed 3wk backpack trips as a younger man (now 59).

    Might consider checking Wilderness Inquiry, they take one party of 5-10 people, each summer on the trip starting at the Dempster (Eagle River) to Fort Yukon (where Porcupine connects with Yukon River). Their party will be leaving on 7/7/11 and finishing at Ft. Yukon on 7/27/11-- which is your 3 wk trip that will see the fewest number of people (only village at Old Crow and the people in your trip's party). Price seems reasonable ($3,000) and it includes transportation from Whitehorse and the flight from Ft. Yukon to Fairbanks to catch a flight home. They supply everything (including tandem canoe), except sleeping bag and personal items. A women that took the trip has posted her trip report-- google "Beths Place" and go to her Porcupine trip. I've considered going this route, but want to go solo or with only one other person.

    Good luck. Again-- get Dan Maclean's book-- it will be well worth it.
    Best regards.

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    The Alatna would make a great first trip in a canoe. Have Brooks Range Aviation in Bettles drop you off at Circle Lake. Stash your Ally pack canoe that you bought or rented, most gear, food, etc.. and put a 4lb UDAP electric fence around it to keep bears from messing with it. You take off with a 3-4 day backpack and hike around the Arrigetch Peaks. After that, float down the Alatna at a leisurely pace. Scenic quality high in upper/mid river, wilderness quality very high, solitude good as most, fishing fair, photography and hiking excellent, this river has much to offer. All class one from Circle Lake down. A river I am looking forward to doing soon. Just need 2 weeks off in late August first.


    -Dan


    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Greetings cjcarlson-- I'm taking the Eagle-Bell-Porcupine-Yukon trip, from the Dempster Hwy to Dalton Hwy, in late June. This is my first canoe trip of this length. I'm going solo, since I don't know anyone else that can take the time for such a trip. Wondering if this might interest you-- it would be good (for safety reasons) to depart the Dempster with another canoe, even if we decided after getting to Bell or Porcupine to go separately. Let me know if your interested.

    Best regards, AcSelway

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    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    it would be good (for safety reasons)
    the Romance of traveling alone in Alaska wilderness is something many dream of. The Alaska version of an Australian walkabout.
    Everyone has their own reasons.... I myself dont care to travel alone for no other reason than safety.
    having someone else that is savy can save your life.
    But, you need to find a person that you can live with... and enjoy the trip with. or its not a fun trip either ,, so
    one question I have for you that desire to travel totally alone and do not want to see other people on the trip is.. Why?
    What does that do for your experience to see no other people?
    I have thought about this thread and not posted because I myself do not know of any place in Alaska that would be 100% people free for the amount of time/miles of water you wish to travel.
    I would imagine that no one could guarantee such a river as 100% people free.
    It has made me open my google earth and look though..
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Interesting points Max. Been guilty of this myself on a few float trips.

    Solitude is great until something goes wrong.


    -Dan
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cjcarlson View Post
    Hey I was wondering if anyone had any good suggestions for a good 3 week river canoe trip. I am not from the state and am looking to head up and canoe a river where I will have the least likely chance to run into anyone. have been re-searching the porcupine and chandalar. Nothing of too great a challenge seeing as how i dont know the area but not a novice run either. would greatly appreciate any suggestions
    Hello CJ,

    Couple of things in response:


    1.) 3-week float trips by canoe are to some extent of the unusual --- even considering inclinations for local experienced paddlers or parties reliant on reliable up-to-date information... principal reckoning based on more than the few limitations of watercraft itself. Rafts and kayaks are often viewed as the superior, more sensible, and safer preferences for such a trip.


    2.) I can identify with the aspiration to see few people or no contact with anyone for days on an Alaska wilderness float trip. This is still achievable contrary to other’s opinions posted. For better perspective to keep in mind… there are ways or means in and out, with certain attractions or opportunities at certain times, in addition to inhabitant people living the boondocks.

    3.) I see all the ‘get this or that book’. Disappointing to relate, so much of the content is out-of-date, out-moded, and filled with dreamy viewpoints to be regarded with suspicion today. While dozens upon scores of seldom visited places in Alaska still live to tell the tale, they are best kept hush and off the books.

    Essentials you’re asking for is the trustworthy float trip information that points you in the right direction. If that truth be told here… then regrettably look forward to to see more people seeking the same attractions or opportunities at the same time. I have several optimal river trip plans thoroughly per your wishes; nevertheless I’d rarely if ever post these gems. I’d go the email or PM route, but be expecting that one would respect my guidance by not re-posting a bunch of specifically named inquiry here.

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    Truth is that there are many, many Alaska wilderness rivers including their tributaries or creative traverses... several having few to no visitations per season for very good reasons (like expense, rapids, hazards, seasons, weather, water, fishing or no fishing, hunting or no hunting, etc.) along lengthy multi-day stretches as well as the extreme unlikelihood of running into another party on these kinds of float trips. Over the past near 30 years now of boating Alaska wilderness rivers, I’ll be the first to articulate visitor conditions, impacts, and numbers on loads of rivers have indeed changed. Yet, I'll also relate near untouched, fantastic gems still abound. Not a warranty by any nature, however I will guaranty your short-ranging and somewhat aimed reply is what effectually bites!
    Last edited by Brian M; 01-21-2011 at 17:28.

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    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    There are some great places for sure.
    fewer people is always nice
    Last edited by Alaskacanoe; 01-20-2011 at 23:00.
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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    Some food for thought:

    Original poster CJ is on a close track with float trips like the the Chandalar.

    On North Fork, the likelihood of seeing much of anyone 'til Venetie is remote. If he ran the East Fork down the Junjik Tributary CJ would find no one until Arctic Village. Both forks run 160-200+ miles.

    I also know very well that CJ would be in great spirits running the Anaktuvuk into Colville with a short portage from the Pass to Cache Lake. The water character and difficulty levels are spot-on as CJ described he was seeking.
    Last edited by Brian M; 01-21-2011 at 17:31. Reason: referenced edited post

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    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Thanks for clearing that up Brian.
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by twoeagleak View Post
    welcome to the forum
    below is a one book i found on amazon.com, there are probably others if you do a search.
    another is "Floating hunting Alaska's rivers," very good read, with info on different rivers, their location, and how to access them.
    many other people on here have intimate knowledge of specific rivers.
    good luck,
    tom..................



    http://www.amazon.com/Alaska-Wildern...ref=pd_sim_b_5
    It is a great book and you can contact the author on this site as he is one of the moderators.

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