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Thread: If you have to leave a trophy over night, what should you do....?

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    Default If you have to leave a trophy over night, what should you do....?

    If for some reason you have to leave the processing till tomorrow, what can you do to protect the trophy.........?

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    If for some reason you have to leave the processing till tomorrow, what can you do to protect the trophy.........?
    I guess that depends on what you are protecting it from? I would guess you are referring to possible damage by predators? If so, set the trophy portion away from the meat/gut pile as much as possible. Animals are looking for food, not a bone to chew on if they get a choice. Place a sweaty undergarment over the trophy. I usually throw a T-shirt over anything to be left behind for any length of time. This does work well. Also, urinate as much as possible around the site.

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    If for some reason you have to leave the processing till tomorrow, what can you do to protect the trophy.........?
    Best option...sit and watch it. I've tried the "go back to camp and hope for the best" option a few times, only lost the trophy (caribou horns) once.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    If for some reason you have to leave the processing till tomorrow, what can you do to protect the trophy.........?
    Not certain what it is being "protected" from.
    With bears best to make the opening cuts and gut - everything else gut - with all kills carefully mark the location so the position can be recognized from a distance and move the animal to an open area if possible. With moose where a couple of trips will necessary move to an open area as soon as possible then complete the packing out process.
    Only out of "compassion" for whatever might be going to get what is being protected should something like a raincoat be left at the kill site. Though, in my experience they won't wear it, if anything will just bite holes in it and has NO value as a deterrent. Same can probably be said for any of the other "deterrents" commonly mentioned.
    Of course, there is the option of not shooting in those circumstances, and just waiting to harvest the animal when enough time remains to complete the salvaging on the same day.
    Joe

  5. #5

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    If you have to leave a trophy over night, what should you do....?

    Wait till she is asleep!

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    Member Milo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aksquirrel View Post
    If you have to leave a trophy over night, what should you do....?

    Wait till she is asleep!
    Don't let your wife find out.

  7. #7

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    I am interested in ideas, the main thing I have done is to cover the eyes so the birds (D@mn Magpies) don't do damage. I have also done the sweaty t-shirt thing. Also cut a pole (if available) but ribbon on one end a lash the other to the highest other limb that is near. The silver side of space blankets are good for seeing.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    Not certain what it is being "protected" from.
    With bears best to make the opening cuts and gut - everything else gut - with all kills carefully mark the location so the position can be recognized from a distance and move the animal to an open area if possible. With moose where a couple of trips will necessary move to an open area as soon as possible then complete the packing out process.
    Only out of "compassion" for whatever might be going to get what is being protected should something like a raincoat be left at the kill site. Though, in my experience they won't wear it, if anything will just bite holes in it and has NO value as a deterrent. Same can probably be said for any of the other "deterrents" commonly mentioned.
    Of course, there is the option of not shooting in those circumstances, and just waiting to harvest the animal when enough time remains to complete the salvaging on the same day.
    Joe
    Personal experience does show me that leaving things that smell like humans behind works. Dad and a buddy shot a moose within about 20 yards of each other. Couldn't complete the work that night, so my dad left sweaty clothes (not talking raincoat, but more like an undershirt) over the remaining portions of his moose carcass. The other guy did not want to leave anything of his behind. The next morning, bear tracks came up, went right past my dad's moose and directly to where the other guys "was" (since it had been drug off into the woods about 50 yards by the bear). Given the opportunity, bears will usually avoid humans and human smelling things.

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    If you had no choice, for Moose I'd gut it, prop open the cavity, give it a good rinse and cover the GP with grass, brush or whatever I could find to try and keep the scent down then pray. For smaller game like deer and bou I'd gut and drag the animal as far away as possible and pray they don't eat all the guts before I returned for the meat. If you have time to cape out the critter you can loose a little sleep make the time to care for the meat, unless an emergency arose like hypothermia ect.

    Had some real adventures doing it but I've always stayed and broken down the animal and moved meat and trophy away from the GP and I tie the trophy to some bushes if possible, tarp the meat as well as mark my territory not that it makes a diff but may as well if ya gotta go. It's not fun but more than once I've stumbled into camp with a load of meat @ 1 or 2 am, siwashed a few times too. I sleep better knowing the meat is well cared for and away from the GP, but there is still a good chance of a bear getting on the meat so pack it out quickly. I've been lucky and haven't lost a whole animal to the critters, have had foxes steal 1/2 a bou from my spike camp over the course of 5 day's, clients fired every round they had (over 40) and didn't lift a single hair off those foxe-EErrrrgh!

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    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    I have left bears un-skinned in the field overnight on many occasions. These bears were shot at dark:30, and camp was off in the distance. I simply wrap my shirt around the head and eyes. Hopefully the smell of me will keep some animals away from the carcass. I wrap my shirt around the eyes to keep birds from pecking at the eyes and mouth. The only critter I worry about messing with the kill site is a wolverine.
    After leaving a dead animal in the field I generally do not sleep well. So it is easy to get up very early and hustle back to the kill site and get to working.

    I have also stayed through the night with dead rams when I got them way far from camp. While the headlight batteries are still good, you can get alot of cape work done. After the batteries go dead I do jumping jacks and walk in little circles to stay warm until it gets light enough to see my way off the mountain.

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    The only time I've left one was if we could not run the boat after dark. Otherwise I stay working with my head lamp. If I have to leave it I don't have time to remove the trophy parts. Gut and skin rolling it on it's back proping the legs as best I can. As protection from birds I try to be back at first light.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    I am interested in ideas, the main thing I have done is to cover the eyes so the birds (D@mn Magpies) don't do damage. I have also done the sweaty t-shirt thing. Also cut a pole (if available) but ribbon on one end a lash the other to the highest other limb that is near. The silver side of space blankets are good for seeing.
    The one other thing is to leave the gutted animal on their belly - keeps the birds from pecking away at the exposed portion of the hams.
    Joe

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    Personal experience does show me that leaving things that smell like humans behind works. Dad and a buddy shot a moose within about 20 yards of each other. Couldn't complete the work that night, so my dad left sweaty clothes (not talking raincoat, but more like an undershirt) over the remaining portions of his moose carcass. The other guy did not want to leave anything of his behind. The next morning, bear tracks came up, went right past my dad's moose and directly to where the other guys "was" (since it had been drug off into the woods about 50 yards by the bear). Given the opportunity, bears will usually avoid humans and human smelling things.
    Do you feel the bear would have avoided both kills if each would have been protected with a sweaty piece of clothing?
    Joe

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    When an unskinned animal is left out overnight and not skinned, will the hair slip on the "warm" side next to the ground?

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ibex View Post
    When an unskinned animal is left out overnight and not skinned, will the hair slip on the "warm" side next to the ground?
    Not with any I've dealt with. We have lots of them both ways, especially bears.
    Joe

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    Then the bear would have avoided both kills if each would have been protected with a sweaty piece of clothing?
    Joe
    Re-read the post. "Given the opportunity....." If the carcasses were both "scented up", the bear may avoid them in favor of the gut piles or other scraps laying around first. Typically, you are not gone for long, so a bear won't have a lot of time on the site before you get back. If you delay their start, you will be in much better shape than if you don't.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    The one other thing is to leave the gutted animal on their belly - keeps the birds from pecking away at the exposed portion of the hams. The worst mess we've dealt with have been eagles on Kodiak. With deer or caribou if we couldn't be back to them at first light we wouldn't take either. Sort of made one "dream" of the "good ole" bounty days!
    Joe
    Ran out of my fifteen minute time for modifying original post.

  18. #18

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    My experience is that bears are interested in the gut pile, not the meat. I've had bears polish off the gut pile but not touch the meat (in game bags hanging a foot or two off the ground ten feets away). I lost the antlers to my first caribou because I left them attached to the head and a bear dragged it away overnight. After that I always removed the antlers from the head and moved them some distance away.

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    I dont shoot animals if I cant take 'em home......but while in the feild, say camping and working up a load of meat, I will skin, gut any animal, and if its for overnight, I'll flip em belly cavity down and pile willows atop, outside the tent or where the meats gather'd.
    That keeps the Ravens off.
    I will move the meat away from the gut pile and leave them and the horns/antlers with the guts to keep any predator off and give em someting to chew on.

    If its winter, we really scrape up the blood, and hide it, 'cause Ravens will certainly see that, and the predators go where the Ravens are gather'd.
    Animals that are left overnight should be skinned or the meat will sour quickly, in summer.

    If your near trees, hang your meats up, and place pole/brush around, keeps them critteers off as well.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I would keep laying there untill someone found what was left of me
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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