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Thread: Identify this Mauser

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    Default Identify this Mauser

    I just came into possession of a Mauser sporter that I am unable to identify. At first glance you might assume that it was just a sporterized vz-24, but several things indicate to me that this may not be the case, or that it was a factory sporter conversion. I don't have pictures right now, but I will post them when I can.
    The action is a Brno vz-24 with the Guatemalan crest. It has a matching four digit serial number on the receiver and barrel. The left side of the receiver has the cut out for use with stripper clips. The safety is the military style "over the top" safety. It has a very nice sporter style turned down bolt handle. The barrel is marked 30-06 Caliber, Model S98. There are no other visible markings, but I have not taken it out of the stock yet.
    The stock is a very nice piece of walnut with a Monte Carlo and dark forend tip which I have not yet identified (possibly ebony). I has a sporter style front sight with bead and a fold down rear sight right over the barrel markings. It also have Weaver bases on the receiver.
    The overall fit and finish of the rifle leads me to believe that it is not your average sporterized military Mauser. In addition, in looking around on the internet I have found a few references to guns which seem to be identical to this one (same barrel markings, always with a Guatemalan crest). Nobody seems to know the story behind them, though. Any help positively identifying this would be appreciated.
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    Quote Originally Posted by walk-in View Post
    I just came into possession of a Mauser sporter that I am unable to identify. At first glance you might assume that it was just a sporterized vz-24, but several things indicate to me that this may not be the case, or that it was a factory sporter conversion. I don't have pictures right now, but I will post them when I can.
    The action is a Brno vz-24 with the Guatemalan crest. It has a matching four digit serial number on the receiver and barrel. The left side of the receiver has the cut out for use with stripper clips. The safety is the military style "over the top" safety. It has a very nice sporter style turned down bolt handle. The barrel is marked 30-06 Caliber, Model S98. There are no other visible markings, but I have not taken it out of the stock yet.
    The stock is a very nice piece of walnut with a Monte Carlo and dark forend tip which I have not yet identified (possibly ebony). I has a sporter style front sight with bead and a fold down rear sight right over the barrel markings. It also have Weaver bases on the receiver.
    The overall fit and finish of the rifle leads me to believe that it is not your average sporterized military Mauser. In addition, in looking around on the internet I have found a few references to guns which seem to be identical to this one (same barrel markings, always with a Guatemalan crest). Nobody seems to know the story behind them, though. Any help positively identifying this would be appreciated.
    If you want help with ID, try posting pix.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nitroman View Post
    If you want help with ID, try posting pix.
    As I said, I don't have pics yet, but I will post them when I can.
    We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
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    In 1937 Guatemala bought 4,000 Vz-24 contract rifles chambered in 7x57mm Mauser. Over the years they also bought various spare parts and stocks for all over Europe. These parts and pieces were incorporated into the exiting Vz-24s. Vz-33s and any other contract Mausers they had been buying.(Including 1910 Mausers made at Oberndorf, which had previously belonged to Serbia)

    Following WWII, the leftist President thought he was in danger due to rumors of a coup, so he ordered a big shipment of VZ-24s and Vz-33 rifles. From what was then the eastern communist block.

    Well, the rumors were true and he had his butt kicked by rebels within the military. (with CIA backing) The military then ruled that country until very recently.

    In the 1960s a big shipment of Guatemalan rifles was imported into the US. Many I have seen had been converted via re-barreling to fire 30-06. Most were sporterized, since nobody back then thought they would ever be collectors items.

    Recently another group of rifles has also been imported . These mostly appear to be from the later period and they are a mixed bag or parts and stocks.

    Your sounds like a standard military Vz-24 which was professionally converted into a nice sporter.
    During the 1960s we had real gunsmiths walking amongst us. Some mail order outfits like Sears and Roebuck, plus Montgomery Wards sold thousands sporterized Mausers right out of their catalogs.
    Your barrel markings tend to make me think this was the case with your rifle.
    Your stocks sounds like a Bishop made stock, although it might be a Fajen.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Your sounds like a standard military Vz-24 which was professionally converted into a nice sporter.
    During the 1960s we had real gunsmiths walking amongst us. Some mail order outfits like Sears and Roebuck, plus Montgomery Wards sold thousands sporterized Mausers right out of their catalogs.
    Your barrel markings tend to make me think this was the case with your rifle.
    Your stocks sounds like a Bishop made stock, although it might be a Fajen.
    This is kind of what I thought. Wisner's has a listing of store brand rifles that includes many of the Sears/Monkey Ward guns, but this one isn't there. Obviously, since I've been able to find other references to Guatemalan Mausers with identical markings, somebody was in the business of doing this. I'd like to find out who/where/when. I am undecided at this point what I will do with it. I suppose I will see how it shoots first. Unless I find out that is has some significant collector value (which I doubt), I may rebarrel it. We'll see.
    I'll post pictures when I figure out where I left my camera.
    We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
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    Does it have a nice smooth sporter barrel or does the barrel have steps in it? Some of the VZ-24s were the JC lightweight model and the military step barrel on those was a little thinner with a less noticeable step.
    Unless somebody marked the barrel or action under the wood-line, you will never be able to figure out who built it.

    Unfortunately now that it has been sporterized the value depends on personal preference. Clean the heck out of the barrel first and you may be very surprised by how accurate she shoots.
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    It has a pretty nice looking sporter barrel. Overall, the whole thing looks to be very clean and in good shape. Personally, I like a well-done sporterized Mauser. I know they have little or no value to collectors of military rifles, but to me they represent that post-war era when there seemed to be an over abundance of Mausers and the logical thing to do with them was to turn them into hunting rifles. Don't get me wrong....I've seen some real butcher jobs, but I'm always on the lookout for a professional one. I would never sporterize an old Mauser now, but I do like some of the ones that were done back then. The beauty of it is that I like something which most collectors do not, and can find very nice guns for reasonable prices every once in awhile.
    I'm going to take it out of the stock when I get a chance in the next week or 2, so I may (or may not) find out more then.
    We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
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    I agree, I love a nicely done Mauser. Particularly from the late 40s through the late 50s. The time period when the US was at it's peak of strength and dozens of great gunsmiths and ammo designers were throwing out new ideas every few months.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
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