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Thread: .22-250 factory loads for combo predators

  1. #1
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    Default .22-250 factory loads for combo predators

    i recently learned a lesson the hard way and shot a fox @ 25 yards with my .22-250. Not pretty. It took alot of sewing but I put it back together. I have decided that a shotgun for animals out to 50 yards is probably a good idea, as well as carrying my .17hmr for shots over that distance. I would like to use my .22-250, beings that there are plenty of wolves in the areas that i hunt, but I dont want to ruin any lynx or fox that i am more likely to call in. Im shooting Remington Express 55 grain psp in .22-250, which i now know is not a good idea. Are there any factory loads that anyone reccomends that may be more fur friendly? Also as far as shotgun loads, no. 2 steelshot sound about right? I know that people use turkey loads and buckshot but what would buckshot do to a fox at close range? Thanks all for any reccomendations

  2. #2

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    Hey man, when discharging the shotgun at 4-legged critters up to 50 yards #2 steel is way too light. I use lead 00 buckshot in 3-1/2" up to 50 yards. Anything much further I'll pass up the shot with a scattergun. Good luck.

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    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    55gr FMJ should punch a perfect little hole through... I am loading some Barnes Gernades that I hope to test soon. They don't have much penetration since they are a frangible bullet.

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    My preferred load for foxes/yotes in a 12 ga would be "BB" (lead) next would be #4 buck.
    I think a BB is around .22 caliber pellet & #4 buck is a .24. In a 3" shell you get about 12 "00" buck pellets vs 47 pellets of #4 buck. At 50 yds those 12 pellets get spread mighty thin.
    I think Federal is making a load just for dog hunting - you might nwant to check them out.

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    I second the 55 gr fmj. I've had good luck with both lynx and fox with this round. But I load my own. I don't know if there is anything stores. I also stay on the low side for velocity. Hope this helps.
    I'm going to ctrl-alt-delete you so hard your mama's computer is going to reboot.

  6. #6

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    I shot my lynx at 40 yrds with 3.5 hevi shot dead coyote loads no damage to hide at all.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    My preferred load for foxes/yotes in a 12 ga would be "BB" (lead) next would be #4 buck.
    I think a BB is around .22 caliber pellet & #4 buck is a .24. In a 3" shell you get about 12 "00" buck pellets vs 47 pellets of #4 buck. At 50 yds those 12 pellets get spread mighty thin.
    I think Federal is making a load just for dog hunting - you might nwant to check them out.
    Gary, with a modified choke the pattern is perfect for a coyote sized critter. Took a coyote a while back at about that range and she was wearing 4 of them. Dropped in her tracks. A 00 buck is .33 caliber. I have patterned them and other loads with various chokes. It's a good dog setup. I agree, a #4 buck is also effective (lead) in a 3". However, over 50 yards is iffy IMO. My #4 buck's have 41 pellets. My point was shooting the steel at that range is too light.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OATS View Post
    Gary, with a modified choke the pattern is perfect for a coyote sized critter. Took a coyote a while back at about that range and she was wearing 4 of them. Dropped in her tracks. A 00 buck is .33 caliber. I have patterned them and other loads with various chokes. It's a good dog setup. I agree, a #4 buck is also effective (lead) in a 3". However, over 50 yards is iffy IMO. My #4 buck's have 41 pellets. My point was shooting the steel at that range is too light.
    Having shot a few deer (in a former life) with 00, I'm not sure I would use it on a coyote or smaller animal. 50 yd shots at deer were iffy, from my experience. Definitely go with the modified choke on the buck shot. Agree - steel isn't the way to go.

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    Thanks for the info. I will definately put it to use.

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    Why is a modified choke, with any load, better for predator sized game as compared to a full choke? On birds I want to spread my pattern to enhance the opportunity to hit a smaller fast moving target. But why would I want to spread the pattern for a reasonably slow moving fox or larger animal within 50 yards or so?
    And yes, I concur that steel #2 is pretty light fare for predators. I have killed fox w/ lead #4 at +/- 40 yards but I would not take the same shot at a coyote w/ that load at that distance.

  11. #11

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    Rat, my experience is large pellet sizes do not act quite the same as a "cloud" of traditional smaller shot. Large shot seems to stay on it's forward trajectory more than smaller shot. When I pattern, I shoot at 40yds. I can tell you that the larger shot (buckshot) pattern does not have any holes large enough for a coyote to slip through at that range. Not too much change at 50 yards. I'm sure a full choke would be reasonably close at these farther distances. What concerns me is obliterating a lynx in thick cover. In heavy cover it would be unusual for me to take a shot much more than 30-35 yards. Thick cover is the only time I carry a shotgun predator calling, which these days is seldom. I prefer to call in more open places.

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    Just like shooting a rifle, what shoots good in mine may not shoot the same in yours. Shotguns are no different. Variables such as barrel length, choke, shot size (bird or buck) or shell length (2 3/4, 3 or 3 1/2) will have different effects. The key is patterning. Try at different distances to see where you load is hitting and how dense the pattern is to determine your effective range. Make sure you're not using a shotgun with a rifled barrel, as your pattern will look like a halo! Don't be affraid of trying reduced loads, they sometimes pattern better. You might be deprived of some distance, but then again, could be the better upclose and personal load.

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