Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27

Thread: Dangerous Game Guides - Prove Your Skills!

  1. #1
    Member Smokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    3,334

    Default Dangerous Game Guides - Prove Your Skills!

    While enjoying the heavy flow of testosterone about dangerous game gun idea's something popped into my head!

    I have never been on a guided hunt for anything more dangerous than black bears and then a guide never stayed actually with me. However, I have been asked to "prove" my marksmanship skills with bow and gun to guides before they let me go out - fair enuff!
    But, I got to thinkin, if'n I were to hunt big bears or even African big game that could require the guide to help defend your life why wouldn't the hunter then ask the "guide" to take a couple shots to prove they can back you up effectively??? HMMM
    After all its my money and my **** we are talking about - just because a guide has a long history of guiding doesn't mean they can shoot or that their gun is not off target?????
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

  2. #2
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Default

    Sounds fair enough.
    I generally ask my client-hunters to shoot a few practice rounds. Then I launch off a couple from my guide gun, Big Ugly. Then, I like to shoot a couple rounds from their gun, and offer to let them use mine. Those practice shots are so that we both will gain confidence from each, and with other, as a team.
    Common, every hunt type stuff...
    dennis

  3. #3

    Default

    While standing on the beach, listening to the fading drone of the beaver that is about to disappear from view, probably isn't the time to be figuring out if your guide "...can shoot...".
    Joe

    Quote Originally Posted by Smokey View Post
    While enjoying the heavy flow of testosterone about dangerous game gun idea's something popped into my head!

    I have never been on a guided hunt for anything more dangerous than black bears and then a guide never stayed actually with me. However, I have been asked to "prove" my marksmanship skills with bow and gun to guides before they let me go out - fair enuff!
    But, I got to thinkin, if'n I were to hunt big bears or even African big game that could require the guide to help defend your life why wouldn't the hunter then ask the "guide" to take a couple shots to prove they can back you up effectively??? HMMM
    After all its my money and my **** we are talking about - just because a guide has a long history of guiding doesn't mean they can shoot or that their gun is not off target?????

  4. #4
    Member CGSwimmer25's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Kodiak, Ak
    Posts
    695

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
    Sounds fair enough.
    I generally ask my client-hunters to shoot a few practice rounds. Then I launch off a couple from my guide gun, Big Ugly. Then, I like to shoot a couple rounds from their gun, and offer to let them use mine. Those practice shots are so that we both will gain confidence from each, and with other, as a team.
    Common, every hunt type stuff...
    dennis
    Good call, I've never been on a guided hunt but that sounds like a great way to start off a hunt with a client.

  5. #5
    Member ninefoot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    alaska, all over the state
    Posts
    986

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Smokey View Post
    While enjoying the heavy flow of testosterone about dangerous game gun idea's something popped into my head!

    I have never been on a guided hunt for anything more dangerous than black bears and then a guide never stayed actually with me. However, I have been asked to "prove" my marksmanship skills with bow and gun to guides before they let me go out - fair enuff!
    But, I got to thinkin, if'n I were to hunt big bears or even African big game that could require the guide to help defend your life why wouldn't the hunter then ask the "guide" to take a couple shots to prove they can back you up effectively??? HMMM
    After all its my money and my **** we are talking about - just because a guide has a long history of guiding doesn't mean they can shoot or that their gun is not off target?????
    sure...absolutely understandable, and i've shot with clients many times...i know that if i were the client i would prefer to see the guide shoot as well....definitely and quite unfortunately not all guides are great marksmen...some seem to neglect that part of there role in the off season and dont shoot much i think...

    i'll mention that sometimes i personally dont get to shoot with clients as they shot when they were in town before there bush flight to wherever i may be in the mountains...asst guides are often in the field two, three, four hunts at a time, and have to rely on the staff back at base camp to assure the clients guns are zeroed. obviously i dont like shooting once in the field...so there are times when clients might not get to see his guide shoot...definitely uderstand your hypothetical concern though.

    zack

  6. #6

    Default

    I used to guide. It has been almost ten years since I guided, but when I used to guide, occasionally the hunter would check his gun to see if the scope perhaps got bumped on the flight in. It was never a competition to see who could outshoot who. In fact, I would venture to say that most of my clients were far better shooters than I. I didn't take it personally. The fact of the matter is, most of the guys I took hunting were much more wealthy than I was, and they could afford to shoot regularly. I always checked to see if my rifle was sighted in also, if I had enough bullets to spare, but it was never looked at as a competition about who is the better shot, or who has the better weapon. The main goal was always to let the hunter kill his own animal, but only if he needed some back up, then I would be there just in case. But I suppose it is always a good practice on any hunt regardless of whether you are guided or unguided to check to see that your scope is sighted in. And that goes for everyone who is carrying a weapon in the field.

  7. #7
    Member ninefoot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    alaska, all over the state
    Posts
    986

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    While standing on the beach, listening to the fading drone of the beaver that is about to disappear from view, probably isn't the time to be figuring out if your guide "...can shoot...".
    Joe
    lol... true statement.

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    931

    Default

    With any luck... dependable head guides or assistant guides will show enough respect for the game, should owe this to a customer, and want to share a good experience with whatever ethical regards to all.

    I know ya did not ask this but -- Does this demand the guide need be a professional sniper? NO. In reality this whomever guide will likely possess a tool firearm, lesser optics, and such-like than the high paying client and perchance shoot fewer times a range session or season.

    What you did inquire about -- should a guide be challenged by client to prove something? To each there own - maybe true enough; yet my answer is NO.

    There is a whole lot to missing a big game animal than simply verifying a rifles zero on a three to five shot group. This does very little to prove proficiency and competency afield. For example sake: This would be like someone going through the motions at the shop with a set of oars here in town... then this air-band demonstration is to somehow put the final persuasion into the picture that we are river ready for a week long whitewater float hunting trip.

    A guides gun and accessories ought to be dependable, accurate, fit to task, and familiar --- that is it!

    Many guided hunter folks think their guide should be a great crack-shot --- truth be told - Untrue!

    To be more specific (my baseline on all guiding pursuits)... What you are paying for (and should rely on) is someone highly familiar, experienced, safe, competent, confident, cooperative, and comfortable in the given surroundings with all situations/scenarios that you've hired for leadership making the choices. On a guided trip of any sort, I look to find a person on routine, practiced, and familiar terms with the surroundings, seasons, settings and conditions. I would have the expectations that they are mentally and physically fit to get 'er done through thick and thin. I'll go further to include trusting they have patience and perseverance with perceptiveness, receptiveness, caution, people skills, coolness under fire, MacGyver-like fixes in a pinch, sense of humor, and individual toughness.

    Bottom line pay close attention learning as much as you can from a guided hunt --- this is the invaluable part a good guided experience and something of a real world success you can always come out of the field with. Gut and skin this lesson out... Debriefing for years to come in your daydreams.

    Whether or not some guide can crack three shots in a bottle cap at 100 paces or rack off 5 rounds into a bouncing basketball in <2 seconds at <20 yards from a Bolt would never factor into my
    $$$-factor as some like to put it.

    Always keep in mind that challenging some guides on top of their target game to a little shootin' match may end up backfiring on ya with that whatever ya got.

  9. #9
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,599

    Default

    Be hard for a client to beat Joe's H&H side lock double in 500NE at todays value about hundred grand. Being a cook I always enjoyed popping a squirrel or porky with my 45/70 to prove I could shoot better than cook and not just a pretty apron
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  10. #10
    Member Alasken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eastern Oregon
    Posts
    457

    Default

    Brian,
    I always shot with my clients when they got to camp. It helped them trust me. From the word go.
    I'm glad you didn't have cap lock on too. Happy Holidays.
    Art is making something out of nothing and selling it.
    - Frank Zappa

  11. #11
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    were i ever to hire a guide( highly unlikely) it would not be the shooting i would want to know about.. i am already fine with mine and not sure any guide that felt the need to shoot it for me.. wouldn't get my gun but along side his head...

    would i sign on with a guide i would want PROOF of the assistant he is pawning me out to.. i would want proof he is able, knows how to judge an animal to be legal, lest alone a trophy,, and even knows how to find them to begin with..

    i want to know that assistant guide knows HOW to avoid setting me up for a close encounter that results in the wrong animal being shot.. i want to know that that person has the ability to adequately respond should i fall off a hill... i short.. if i spend that kind of cash.. i want to know.. i ain't paying to baby sit some college kid who has dreams of grander, and want to go see a bus.. Not that that is very likely either.. but you get my point..

    besides.. if i spend that kind of cash... the guide will be to busy carrying my gun... to worry about having his along anyway.... ( yeah i am kidding on that one)
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  12. #12

    Default

    Hell I don't even have an idea how to respond to this thread........Give me a guide that bought his clothes at the salvation army, has duck tape on half of his fingers, has a firearm that looks like a well used handy-man jack. He ain't washed in five weeks, he stinks, one boot has 550 cord laces, his rifle sling is clothes-line, he has a good pack, good binoculars, and he can cook some slop twice a day, and understands that the single most important thing is my completing the hunt safely, and that my safety is 1,000 times more important than my harvesting game. Give me someone who love's the animals he hunts, someone with reverence for the one-ness of the universe. And you can stick his shooting ability side-ways up your butt.

    Sorry if I was shy about being direct about my feelings.

  13. #13
    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Beaver Fork
    Posts
    3,853

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Hell I don't even have an idea how to respond to this thread........Give me a guide that bought his clothes at the salvation army, has duck tape on half of his fingers, has a firearm that looks like a well used handy-man jack. He ain't washed in five weeks, he stinks, one boot has 550 cord laces, his rifle sling is clothes-line, he has a good pack, good binoculars, and he can cook some slop twice a day, and understands that the single most important thing is my completing the hunt safely, and that my safety is 1,000 times more important than my harvesting game. Give me someone who love's the animals he hunts, someone with reverence for the one-ness of the universe. And you can stick his shooting ability side-ways up your butt.
    Priceless...
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

  14. #14
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Tanana Valley AK
    Posts
    7,216

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Smokey View Post
    While enjoying the heavy flow of testosterone about dangerous game gun idea's something popped into my head!

    I have never been on a guided hunt for anything more dangerous than black bears and then a guide never stayed actually with me. However, I have been asked to "prove" my marksmanship skills with bow and gun to guides before they let me go out - fair enuff!
    But, I got to thinkin, if'n I were to hunt big bears or even African big game that could require the guide to help defend your life why wouldn't the hunter then ask the "guide" to take a couple shots to prove they can back you up effectively??? HMMM
    After all its my money and my **** we are talking about - just because a guide has a long history of guiding doesn't mean they can shoot or that their gun is not off target?????
    I think if I was going to hunt potentially dangerous game in a place I was not familiar with, a guide with a looong history is exactly what I would be looking for. I tend to like flying with old pilots too.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

  15. #15

    Default

    One of the best Master Guides I know packed a Pre-64 Model-70 .375 H&H that was covered in rust, water destroyed, bleached-out finish on the wood, and had "NO" scope & no front sight, it just had an old rear sight.

  16. #16
    Member Milo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,472

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    While standing on the beach, listening to the fading drone of the beaver that is about to disappear from view, probably isn't the time to be figuring out if your guide "...can shoot...".
    Joe
    Guess it isn't the time to figure out if the client can shoot either, unless as a guide, you feel like turning it into at $20,000 camping trip.

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    One of the best Master Guides I know packed a Pre-64 Model-70 .375 H&H that was covered in rust, water destroyed, bleached-out finish on the wood, and had "NO" scope & no front sight, it just had an old rear sight.
    Probably got close enough the "extras" weren't necessary! Those surplus stores have some really good stuff.
    Joe

  18. #18
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    I think if I was going to hunt potentially dangerous game in a place I was not familiar with, a guide with a looong history is exactly what I would be looking for. I tend to like flying with old pilots too.
    I have to agree with this. I really could care less if a guide can shoot MOA, I would be more concerned if they could shoot MOB (minute of bear). Especially if that bear or buffalo or elephant had me in its sites! That, in my opinion, comes with a lot of years hanging out with critters that will hand you your ass.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  19. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Milo View Post
    Guess it isn't the time to figure out if the client can shoot either, unless as a guide, you feel like turning it into at $20,000 camping trip.
    Over the years never had a client that couldn't shoot, though some were certainly more proficient than others. Doesn't take much to get them "up to speed" as they all have scopes. Plus, get them into a good shooting position and they do just fine.
    Joe

  20. #20
    Member Milo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,472

    Default

    I do actually agreed - A individual's "mental state" is the most important factor in any crisis situation.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •