Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 69

Thread: cost of a bear hunt

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    3

    Default cost of a bear hunt

    I've been looking for a bear hunt for a few years now. Every outfitter I have seen gets approx $10,000 -$12,000 for 7 days.
    This is in a tent, NOT a cabin! This does NOT include my airfare, liscense and does NOT include prep of hide and ship back home.
    If a small outfitter books 10 bear hunts in 3-4 months, thats $120,000 now yes they pay for a bush plane, but I have spoke to locals and its only $75-$150 flight. Yes they have quads, boats, yes they spend every waking minute scouting ect, but at $12,00 for 7 days in a tent. That comes to some serious money for only working less than a half a year.
    Nowdays with the internet, that helps reduce how many shows you need to drive to for finding clients.
    Even when you factor in a hired hand or 2 for 3 months, its still looks like a good money maker.

    So, what big costs am I missing for a small time outfitter?
    most of the outfitters I spoke with hunt public land too.
    Even some outfitters don't offer fishing either. If you bag your bear the first couple of days, thats it your done.
    I don't mean to complain, I just would like to know what costs I'm missing?

  2. #2

    Default Lots

    I'm not an outfitter but you ommitted about a 100 or so costs incurred by guides who do hunts in Alaska. Also not many guides I know or talk to are making enough cash in a year so that they don't have to take a second or part-time job. Some of the guides on this forum will give you some idea of their overhead It' s not just a four wheeler that costs cash up here, BUT yoy can by one in the lower 48 and save several grand versus buying here.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  3. #3

    Default

    I'll give you one of the many costs associated with said hunt. The asst guide that will spend every waking minute with you usually gets $175-$200 a day for the hunt so on a 10 day hunt theres $2000 he has to pay the asst guide right off the bat. And if you can tell me who flys a supercub or beaver for $75-$150 each way I'd sure like to know cuz the going rate is a whole bunch more than that. Just to give you an idea I think we paid almost $3000 round trip to be flown into the Alaska Peninsula in a Beaver this past spring to bear hunt, and we are residents using a local air charter.Theres a whole bunch of costs your not aware of or accurate in your calculations, now if a big guide service does enough hunts of multiple species year round he can make money but its not as much profit as your thinking.

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    3

    Default

    I guess I was told wrong about the bush flight. I was told by a local that they paid those amounts for flights approx 150 miles one way. Not along ways by any means, but I am talking about guides that hunt in the general areas they live.so yes, the flight costs would go up according to you. However, if a bush plane costs $3,000 then I guess some of those fishing guides must be offering there services for free becasue I've seen AK fly-in trips for not much more than $3,000. Thats picking you up at Ancharge and flying you into camp.
    Please keep in mind, I'm not complaining, I just would like to get a idea what drives this cost. If theres cabins, yes I understand, but sleeping in a tent? that seems to reduce costs..wouldn't it?
    Funny thing about this is, I talked with a couple of local hunters near Nome and they couldn't believe the cost was as high as $12,000 so that got me wondering.

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    3

    Default

    I just did a brief look-up and a cessna 206 runs $390/per hour with upto 5 people/850 lbs gear or a bigger plane - 7 people/1250 lbs gear for $600/ hour this is southern AK region. Not sure how far you fly your clients, but I'm talking about small outfitters that tend to hunt the general areas they live.

  6. #6
    New member mtcop71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama, United States
    Posts
    230

    Default hhhmm!

    that is 850 lb limit, you will need to get some small guys in there.. and no gear. and I bet that is 390 per person.. Branch River prices right???
    2 guys and gear $2000 one way

  7. #7

    Default Air Charters

    I have flown extensively both by drop off hunt rates and charter rates. You will pay 500-600 per hour to charter a beaver. Keep in mind, the time is there and back to take you, and there and back to pick you up. A beaver would take about and hour and a half to go 150 miles. That's three hours flying for the drop off, and three hours flying for the pick up = $3600. If you have too much weight on the way out, you pay for extra flights. If you do a drop off package with some of the charters, they include so many animals without charging for extra flights. That's where you see the $1500-$2000 per person for a drop off 150 miles out of so. That's not the way guides work though. You may get a discount on the charter rate if a guide has an arrangement with the charter. Other costs? I'm not a guide, but just to go on a walk in sheep hunt and a drop off goat hunt (50 mile flight) I have $4000 budgeted this year, and that's only replacing a little bit of gear that has worn out. I can't imagine how much they spend on gear if it gets used all fall every fall. Sometimes I think that $12,000 is about the hardest earned money you could think of.

  8. #8

    Default Forgot

    Oops, forgot to mention capitalism and supply and demand. They charge what the market BEARS:-)

  9. #9
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,453

    Default

    lol these are fun.
    i'm a guide and my bear hunts are only 8500, i do all my own guiding, i don't consider a guide with 3 or 4 others working for him a small outfitt. i'm small...lets take a head count...one....well shoot thats it.
    Couple questions...why would a cabin be cheaper than a tent? its already there, don't cost anything and if he owns it, its on his ground, making his land use fees less. tent you have to fly in almost every time depending on which land use permit you have.

    State land don't mean jack...all that means if you have to get your land use permit from a differnt company.


    Flying..my favorite, the other guys are right on the money, i fly 50 miles one way for my clients, one plane load for all the flying for one client is almost 1000 per hunt.
    Food give or take 2-300 per hunt
    land use fee....maybe a hundred or so per hunt.
    thens theres, business insurance, commercial auto insurance, business license, land use fees, food, fuel, airplanes, gear and all the pro-rated stuff that has to be figured in, and sometimes 15 percent off the top for booking agent, native land use corps are 5 percent of my gross, with a base fee. so basicly..blah blah blah
    if i have a good/great year and nothing breaks i'll proffit 40 percent of my gross, keep in mind thats a good/great year not a good year. A good year i'll only profit 30% meaning i only make 30,000 that year...not good. Guiding is a year round job, with seasonal results.

    so at 8500 per hunt i have to do 11.7 hunts a year to gross 100,000, that would mean i made on a good/great year $40,000. now 11 hunts a year figure i can pull off 2 hunts a month would be five months (and cahnge) with no breaks. but i take three to four days between each hunt to see family and reload for the next guy. Alos a couple days to account for bum weather. that would also be with no booking agents..but usually theres about two to three hunts from them. and some hunts are full price at 8500 either.

    So if 40,000 is enough for a family of four with a house payment and two vehicle payments, one under 25g's and one under 13g's with NO toys and no vacations or trips, then ya i'm making fat bank...

    When you see a price tag, you gotta figure the guys trying to make it thru the winter..unless they've got 7-15 guides working for them they're not making much, a large percentage for a smaller number isnt' the same as a small precentage of a HUGE number.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  10. #10
    Member Alaskacajun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    318

    Default

    BRWNBR you should charge more, some guides get $12,000 a hunt and are living high on the hog....

    - Clint

  11. #11

    Wink Correction

    HIGH on the BEAR !!!
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  12. #12
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,453

    Default

    Well clint if some are charging 12,000 then you'd think my hunts should book up easier wouldn't ya? I'm trying to cater to a crowd thats left behind by those five digit prices. these are grizzly hunts i'm talking about, my brown bear hunts on kodiak are a bit more spendy, but thats not what the first poster was refering to i don't think. kodiak and peninsula bears are priced on supply and demand and logistics...mostly, along with all the other money sucking garbage and hands that are out.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  13. #13
    Member Alasken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eastern Oregon
    Posts
    457

    Default

    Lighten up BRWNBR. The guy is just asking questions. No need to take it personally.

    The guiding business is a high overhead business whether small or big. It's been proven to me that there's no in between either. Either stay very small or go very big.

    There are a lot of costs people don't think about just to get out the door.
    License Fees
    Land Use Permits
    Insurance
    Advertising
    There are probably more but you might get the point.

    Then getting to camp is going to cost for all the food and equipment needed for the hunt. The air taxi bill alone can easily run into the $1000's.

    In addition to the work that's done and the money spent during the short season there's a lot of other work that goes pretty much year-round. Paper work alone takes a great deal of time before and after every season.

    Coming out of it with 25-30% when all the dust settles is doing pretty good. I don't know anyone personally who is guiding ot get rich. My favorite saying is "If I win the lottery I'll keep guiding 'til it's all gone."

  14. #14
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks, Ak.
    Posts
    4,191

    Default

    There's one other reason some guides are so high. RESULTS! Any guide that consistently produces record size bears will have a higher hunt fee than one who rarely has clients shoot B&C bears. To some extent, you guys(non res trophy hunters) are your own worst enemy. You want trophies, so you compete for guides who produce trophies. Supply and Demand.
    Also, the Big Game Commercial Services Board continues to make it harder and more costly to BE a guide, and to BECOME a guide. That don't help prices either!
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    107

    Angry Cheap $16,000?? "Industry standard"

    I just recently inquired about a bear hunt with a outfit here in Kodiak. Just the 10day hunt, no plane, licenses, or any of that....just the hunt and lodging was $16,000 yes 16 thousand!!! It's a family run buisness, the father and 2 sons are the guides (names are not used to protect the inocent)...They told me that they were "par with industry standard" I politly declined their services since that hunt and my rug would have cost me a years income. In my opinion that there is highway robbery! It's like buying cigarettes at the Casino only worse!! Sorry just my little rant.

  16. #16

    Default

    Welcome to the year 2007 Gsheperd, I hate to upset you even further but there are outfits that charge significantly more than that for the same hunt in other places in alaska. Its supply and demand unless you live here. I have seen Elk hunts auctioned off for $50,000 in Arizona,Utah and New Mexico so considering, $15000-$18000 for a trophy brown bear aint too bad really!

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    107

    Exclamation Worth every cent!

    Well, I don't have than money and I do live here in Kodiak. It's still highway robbery! I even offered to bring my own boat, tent, and food... $16,000...industry standard! How about cutting a serviceman a break? Needless to say I'll be paying 30 bucks for my road system hunt this year. So much for Alaskans helping Alaskans!


    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaCub View Post
    Welcome to the year 2007 Gsheperd, I hate to upset you even further but there are outfits that charge significantly more than that for the same hunt in other places in alaska. Its supply and demand unless you live here. I have seen Elk hunts auctioned off for $50,000 in Arizona,Utah and New Mexico so considering, $15000-$18000 for a trophy brown bear aint too bad really!

  18. #18

    Default

    I dont understand what your complaining about then, unless its the fact that you have to draw for a brown bear on kodiak with the exception of the road system, and that, all of us residents deal with. You know theres lots of places that you can fly to from kodiak via air charter to hunt brown bears for a lot less than $16,000 or are you just wanting to be guided? If you have your own boat, tent and food what else do you need? If you draw a Kodiak tag in the coming years you'll have us all beat as your only a 5-10 minute drive from a float plane that will put you in great brown bear hunting country for probably less than $1200 turn key. In 2007 being guided is for the wealthy, those in need of pampering and of course non-residents. Not many residents paying those figures that upset you.

  19. #19
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,453

    Default

    ALASKAN, hey man i wasn't jumping down his throat, i guess i shoulda put a little smiley in there or something...getting a little edgy this off season.?.

    Gsheperd, alaskans helping alaskans, when a guide takes you into his area, you'll need a tag first off, and chances of you having one are about 3 percent according to the drawing percentages. second if he has to contract you he's legal responsiblef for you and the equietment, boat and all that he's responsible for as well. So basicly your boat wouldn't be insured by him so doubtfull that would be legal...might be a loophole, i'm not sure. but it don't sound right. If you have the boats and tents why are you playing on the roadsystem?
    Prices don't go down do they, when i started guiding kodiak a bear hunt was 9500, almost doubled now, in ten years. go figure, when i'm 50 i hate to guess what the tag will be. Lotta things in life we can't afford, and those things usually won't be given to us at a discount cause we need it. Money drives the boat, its up to us to catch it i guess.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  20. #20
    Member shphtr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    1,376

    Default

    Try pricing out a Desert Bighorn Sheep in Mexico on the Sea of Cortez... they started at $60,000 a hunt two years ago and at that time there was a 4 year waiting list....as noted above - supply and demand. If there was some sort or limit on out of state bear hunters (and therefore big spenders) no doubt the law of supply and demand would dictate a more palatable hunt price tag.

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •