View Poll Results: Which gun for Kodiak goat hunt?

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  • Kimber Montana 300 WSM

    29 59.18%
  • Ruger M77 338 WM

    20 40.82%
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Thread: Kodiak Goat Hunt Poll

  1. #1

    Default Kodiak Goat Hunt Poll

    Okay here is a question that I have been discussing with friends and co-workers a bunch here recently. If you were flying down to Kodiak the last week of Septemebr and first week of October to hunt goats and you have the perfect mountain gun (Kimber Montana) in 300 WSM shooting 180 TSX's thats a tack driver and a heavier (Ruger M77) 338WM that is equally scary accurate with both 225 grain TSX's and 250 grain Partitions which one would you guys take. Obviously the catalyst in this question is brown bears and the fact that you might spend even more time than you plan on being there due to weather delays with goat and deer meat hopefully not far from camp. Feel free to explain your vote on the poll.

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    I don't know, Cub... You see, I'm more of an experiential, hands-on type voter. I need to really get to know the issues before casting a vote, especially on important topics. What you'll need to do is fly me down there with you so that I can really understand the nuances of the guns vs. the situations. I'll pack my bags and deer tags.

    -Brian

  3. #3

    Default

    Brian if you dont mind riding on the wing of the Beaver your welcomed to come, me and my pard are bringing a half a semi of gear with us dont figure there will be much room left inside. grins

  4. #4
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    either gun will work, i hate to say it but this is kinda a dumb question, i voted before i read the bottom part...oops. a light gun, thats accurate and shoots 180 grain bullets...orrr a heavy gun thats accurate and only shoots 45 grains heavier....not seeing the payoff with the bigger gun here. sure some numbers are different on paper and so but for the goat hunt the .30 will be fine. chances are you won't see any bears anyway...at least in goat country you can see them coming. gives you time to think.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
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  5. #5

    Default

    BRWNBR, that was exactly my thinking about us being above alder line, its just one of those things that comes up when your talking about hunting on Kodiak I guess. Sometimes getting others opinions is fun. My 338WM will be wearing a McMillan Mcswirly handle in the next month or so and thought that if everybody would say take the 338WM it would give me an excuse to use it, since I never do. <grins>

  6. #6

    Default Simple

    Fly me down to Kodiac and I'll check out the advantages and disadvantages of both rifles and let you know in about 10 days.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  7. #7
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    Wink

    I like Rugers, don"t care for the WSM series of cartridges. Bill
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

  8. #8
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    There're bears on Kodiak. Are you certain those calibers are big enough? At least they both have "magnum" in the name!

    Take the Montaaaaana. You're there on a goat/deer hunt. I'll guess you will climb a bit as well!

  9. #9
    Member walk-in's Avatar
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    Default Ruger

    I'm not a fan of the WSM's, so that is the only reason I voted for the Ruger. If I could take a Kimber in another caliber, that would get my vote.

  10. #10
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Default ummm.......prime time for bears in alpine

    Roland, I'd bet that you guys will see buku bears. As I mentioned in the other thread, we saw many up high in goat country. Its prime time for berries in the alpine there typically around Sept. 30th.
    More to the point though, I'll tell ya, after watching Brwnbr's goat video, I'd be packin some lead for those shaggies. They are surprisingly tough.
    I'm gonna go ruger for this one...take the Kimber to <undisclosed spot> for the ram.

  11. #11
    New member akhunter02's Avatar
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    Default Goats and Bears

    My hunting partner and I are headed down for goats also. We have talked to the BIO about bear issues and electric fences and here is what he had to say.

    "Dean,
    I have a few units I loan out, but generally I send them with folks that
    are hunting deer on the south end and are not to savvy with bears. I
    loan them out on a first come basis, so I can not hold one for ya.

    In the last 9 years I can remember only 2 goat hunter that were hunting
    in alpine lakes that had troubles with bears. Most are folks shooting a
    goat and leaving it on the mt. Another guy was rolling his goat down the
    mountain whole and lost his goat to a bear. When I'm bowhunting for
    goats I have seen bear higher than mountain goats on every trip, but
    bears are pretty alert in the alpine and will move off when they see or
    smell you.

    If you keep a clean camp I don't think you will have any problems. When
    I harvest a goat in the alpine. I'll try to find a ice cave or rock
    shelter somewhere low to the ground , so the scent does not carry. I
    also store meat away from my camp."

    We are both taking .300's and arent worred about the bears

  12. #12

    Default

    Its funny how bears affect so much of our thought process when hunting in Alaska. I used to be very concerned with bears here in the interior when I first came to Alaska and after exposure to them year after year and killing and or participating in the killing of a bunch your perspective kind of changes and you realize that they arent as much of a concern as you once thought they were. But each and every time I see one of the hogs that comes off Kodiak it just kinda makes you sit back and say "Holy Cow" that thing is enormous. And thus these thoughts affect your thought process when going to hunt remote Kodiak for anything. I like many have killed lots of animals all over the good ole USA and know that theres lots of guns that kill well in many different calibers and especially with good shot placement and good bullets. But as you get older and you plan adventures like this in alaskas big bear country and talk about them with your 9 year old son (who thinks that his dad is as big as the world) and your wife you take into thought that theres a lot more at stake here should that one in a hundred situation take place and it makes you want to be **** sure your prepared for it. And this applies not just to my goat hunt on Kodiak but to the guy asking if a .270 is adequate for a back up gun on a brown bear hunt. I would never reccomend a guy take a bigger gun than he can handle but some good common sense should be used in the decision. Me and 2 buddies went to the Pen this past spring on a brown bear hunt and had problems daily with a big 9 or so foot sow that was accompanied by two 2 year olds that were about as big or bigger than most interior griz I have seen and when the trio advanced on us the last night inside 80 yards with nothing but beach between us after us doing everything we could physically and verbally to deter them (shouting and waving our arms), the three of us with a 375 H&H, a 338WM and a 300WM were prepared for the worst, at 60 yards a warning shot was fired in the sand in front of the lagging behind sow in hopes that she would deter the 2 trouble makers leading her to us and thankfully things went our way and they bailed off but man thats a feeling like no other and the longest 5-10 minues I have ever experienced. I learned that thats not the time to wish you had chosen a different gun, especially when things are taking palce in darn near slow mo and every story you ever heard or read is rolling through your brain in high speed DSL mode. The reason I asked about these 2 choices is because they are both guns I shoot extremely well and already own and am very familiar with. So for a little more personal reassurance, should that one in a hundred situation occur I really dont think that the extra 2lbs of rifle is gonna be a burden, especially as we glass a bear roaming a ridge in our direction while ascending on a couple billies. Something about the big bears that live on Kodiak that makes a guy like me that chases interior griz with a bow do a little head scratching if you know what I mean. Thanks for the responses.

  13. #13
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    Living in Kodiak for most of 30 years and taking a number of goats I can say that light is best and either cartridge will do the job. As long as you are using a premium bullet, No worries. Had my first actually all out attack this fall and I did not feel undergunned with a .338 X 06 single shot pistol!

    Where is your destination on the island? Happy to help!
    Neal

  14. #14
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    Hey Niel, good to see you made it over here!!!
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  15. #15

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    Neal

    I am headed down near Karluk along Uyak hunting the DG477 tag. I am booked with Seahawk for a high altitude lake drop the end of Sept.

  16. #16
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    No body hunts way down there most of the time. Kodiak is a guaranteed hunt so you won't have any problems. Weather down there the end of Sept can be really tough. Take high wind gear and extra food. You have a better than 50/50 chance of an overstay. You can give me a call anytime for a bull session or questions and answers. I am in the book.

    Neal

  17. #17
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    I would go with the Kimber, but only because I will be taking mine in a 7WSM instead of the 300.;-) Actually, I will be taking my bow as well, but if the opportunity isn't there, I will go to the rifle in a heart beat. Best of luck in 477.

  18. #18
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    Thumbs up Bigger the Better

    I hunted in the southern Kodiak Island (Deadman Bay area) and saw 25 Brown Bears in 6 days of goat hunting. My goat was taken at a distance of 50 yards.. Which would you carry? I'd take the biggest caliber that I could shoot accurately.

  19. #19
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    guess my goat area dont' have much for bears....at least not up high
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  20. #20

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    358 Hammer, tell me more about the 338-06 single shot pistol. Loads& velocity and what the recoil is like when you touch one off. Tony

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