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Thread: Location question

  1. #1
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    Default Location question

    I am going to be setting up a station for the first time this year and have some questions. I know what the regs are as far as distance from things but I am wondering how far into the woods should I setup. Should I setup a few miles back? Do most of you guys use a four wheeler to get to your stations and if so how do you keep the bears from tearing it up. I have lived in Eagle River for almost two years and have only seen one Black bear and no Browns. Can anyone suggest a general area I should begin scouting in. Thanks in advance.
    Andy

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    I hike into my station and do not use a four wheeler. I would imagine as long as your four wheeler doesn't smell like bait it shouldn't be messed with.

    My station is 1 mile off the road. As for where you should set your stand up? My stand is near the top of a ridgeline as I think it moves my bait smell around better. If you have a four wheeler I would try to get away from other bait stands. I was limited as I am hiking in so I stayed within a mile.

    As for an area for you to start scouting, I can't help you there. I don't think you will find many on the forum here that will. I suggest you find your bait stand the same way me and I would think most others here found theirs. I got the regs, got the maps, looked at google earth, and asked friends that are hunters if they knew of any places. My bait area is great but I'm certainly not looking for 1 more baiter in there. The stands in there are fighting over the same bears. Nothing personal.

  3. #3
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    been using a wheeler for years.. the local bears both brown and black learn to associate it with food...

    my stand run anywhere 1.5-26 miles from the road.

    I always set them in low area, with water nearby... bears will come to your bait on the ridges.. but not stay as long.

    they need water regularly especially when eating dry dog foods and grains, popcorn and stuff like that.. that means they leave and may take longer to return.. not to mention if other baits are in the area..well.. maybe they are on it and not yours.

    heavy cover. you can clear spots.. but blacks like the cover.. A LOT! if it is to open they may not feel secure enough to come in
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Member blasterak's Avatar
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    My stand is over 1 mile or so from the road. I sometimes take my wheeler, makes it easier if I happen to shoot a bear and for bring in bait, almost acts as a dinner bell. But I walk in alot of times as well. Never had a problem with bears messing with my fourwheeler, I usually park it about 200 or so yards away from my station. Mine is near a river and I have had good luck in that area. Last year I set up in a more open area and I dont think that was a good idea, had less bears coming in. Definitely want an area with some cover for the bears.

  5. #5
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Only had bears mess with our wheelers once, and that was while moose hunting. A sow and a cub climbed onto both our wheelers, pee'd on them, tore up a rifle case and carried a helmet into the woods. There wasn't any food on the wheelers.

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    Thanks, sounds like the four wheeler will be safe and I didn't think of it being a dinner bell - good tip. Yeah AKF I understand not wanting to give too much information. I don't want to see anyone near my future station either. My plan is to do my own research I was just asking for real general info. I think reading these forums has given me enough info to get me started. Thanks for sharing everyone...I hope I have some good stories to share during the season.

  7. #7
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Do some scouting in March when the days are long and its warm out. As Vince said cover is the key, but you do need to be back in off the beaten path or it won't matter how much cover you have.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  8. #8

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    Black bears are everywhere, so really wherever there is sign, then you can bait. But two things I like to look for to tip the odds in my favor, are thick cover, and water, preferably a stream. That way the moving water makes a little bit of background noise to cover up any noise you might accidentally make while in your stand. I am no expert by any means, but I have found that the thicker the vegetation, the more bear sightings I usually see. I think it makes them feel more comfortable when they are in thick cover.

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    If a black bear finds a 4-wheeler there is a good change it will eat your seat. I donít know if it the smell, or taste what ever it is bears love to eat seats. If you leave your atv next to a bait station I would put a alarm on it.

  10. #10
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    Have lost 2 wheeler seats to bears while we were sitting in the tree waiting for them to hit the bait. Also have had bears climb into the stand while we were not there and once a small bear actually climbed the tree while we we in it. Had to torch off a round into the ground to discourage him. He did come back again and had to be dispatched. If you are in a tree get high enough to look around and you can watch the bears track (scenting) you in on the trail you walk in & out on. The station has to be 1 mile from any dwelling. Watch out for houses, cabins etc...

  11. #11
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    Thanks for the info!! I can't wait...daylight is coming back

  12. #12

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    How far away from other bait stations is ok. I know it would be great to have nobody around, but if that isn't the case how close is too close to another bait station?

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by granby45 View Post
    How far away from other bait stations is ok. I know it would be great to have nobody around, but if that isn't the case how close is too close to another bait station?
    Legally, there is no rule in place. Anyone can register anywhere, as long as no other rules are violated. But ethically, you should get as far away from another person's bait as possible. If it were me, unless the other person was my friend and we had mutually agreed upon setting up next to one another, I wouldn't get any closer than 1/4 mile. If you can get farther away than that it would be even better, but I would say at least 1/4 mile. Just my 2 cents. Otherwise you could be interfering with one another's stands.

  14. #14

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    Don't forget thick, dense cover - the thicker the better.

    There is a difference between a boar territory and a sow territory. Generally, smaller boars and sows will visit sites void of thick cover and at higher elevations. As a general rule they won't stay as long and if they do, they usually will hit the bait in the evening when it's not as light. Bears travel their territory looking for food and territories often overlap - the further away from everyone you go and the thicker cover you place your stand in, the larger (generally) your bears will be. Bears are more comfortable in thicker cover just as other animals are. Of course this is a general rule and there are always exceptions. If you use an ATV or boat, keep it clean and seal your bait during transport preventing spillage. On your way in, find a place to park and still hunt the last 1/4 - 1/2 mile to prevent announcing your on site. Bears often associate noise with food. Last year we had bears leaving our bait after looking toward our vehicle as we pulled up only to return 2 minutes after we started our vehicle and left. By the end of season we started leaving guys 1/4 mile away to prevent any disruption to the bears. A good trail camera will help considerably - make sure you invest in one.

    Good luck!
    "He should have been packing a more powerful gun...you have to be a very good shot or very lucky to stop a brown bear with a .357 Magnum." - Rick Sinnott, Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist after a double attack by a grizzly.

  15. #15
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKF View Post
    I hike into my station and do not use a four wheeler. I would imagine as long as your four wheeler doesn't smell like bait it shouldn't be messed with.
    AKF
    quite the contrary... bears love to chew the seats off of ATVs and some bears really like to hook their top eye teeth on the tire tread and poke their bottom eye teeth into the thin sidewalls... /John

  16. #16
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    A few tips,

    Be extremely careful about getting bait or bait smells on your wheeler.

    For the early birds, I have know many people who put their sites in when the ground was still frozen only to realize that by May they could no longer reach their site because of giant bogs. One friend had his wheeler stuck for days and had to hand carry out his gear to clear the site he never could reach to hunt.

    Make sure to block the hole to your barrel with sticks so that you aren't feeding squirrels, birds, moose and yes moose will eat dog food.

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
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